Box 21, Folder 4, Document 11

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Box 21, Folder 4, Document 11

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RA.PID TRA.NSIT
FI<..O
METROPOLITAN ATLANTA RAPID TRANSIT AUTHORITY
"~AR.TA
REPORTS TO THE PEOPLE IT SERVES ... "
FEBRUARY, 1967
VOL.
2 , NO.
2
HOUSE APPROVES FIRST
STATE MONEY FOR MARTA
The first state financial aid for rapid transit was approved
by the House of Representatives Monday, Feb. 20, as the
House passed and sent to the Senate the Appropriations
bill for 1968-69. The Appropriations Bill allocates to
MARTA $250,000 during each year of the biennium (Fiscal 1968, 69) , or a total of $500,000. The state grant,
when finally approved, will be used as "matching funds"
for $2 million in federal funds. The two grants will enable
MARTA to begin some detail design and acquisition of some
right-of-way necessary to preserve the route alignments.
The state funds were included in the budget prepared
by then-Governor Carl Sanders, and in the official budget
submitted by Gov. Lester Maddox. A Constitutional amendment approved in the 1968 General Election allows the
state to pay up to "10 percent of the total cost" of the rapid
transit system.
The House Appropriations Committee, with Rep. James
H . "Sloppy" Floyd as chairman, conducted hearings for
three weeks on the budget requests, with MARTA representatives appearing Feb. 8. Representing the Metropolitan
Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority were Henry L. Stuart, General Manager; John Coil, Resident Manager, Parsons Brinckerhoff-Tudor-Bechtel; Stell Huie, MARTA Counsel; Glenn
Bennett, Secretary of the MARTA Board and Executive
Director, Atlanta Region Metropolitan Planning Commission; and King Elliott, MARTA Public Information
Director.
Stuart discussed the creation of MARTA, the early and
current work done on rapid transit, and the revision of the
1962 plan which is now under way. Stuart noted that local
financial support has been excellent, and that all requests
made for federal funds thus far have been approved.
"Through 1967 we will have spent or committed $1.5
million to the project," he added, "and with federal funds
committed, state aid for the first time, and the federal funds
we anticipate getting, the total funded project will be about
$5 million." "This will bring us right up to the detail design
stage, and to a time of decision on the proper methods of
financing the construction of the system," Stuart said.
John Coil, PBTB, outlined current work under way in
preliminary engineering, soil-tests, revision of the 1962
plan, and in other areas of work.
Following the presentations of Stuart and Coil, members
of the committee asked a number of questions; the more
pertinent questions and the MARTA answers are found
on page 2 and 3.
R ep. Jam es H. "Sloppy" Floyd, Chairman, presides over meeting
of H ouse A ppropriations Com m ittee (center back), with Vice Chairman Colquitt H. Odom at his left , and Secretary W illiam J. W iggins ;
man in foreground is R ep. Jones Lane, a m ember of the com m ittee.
Legislators listen carefu lly as answers are given to questions put
to those appearing before the H ouse A ppropriations Committee.
�METROP OLITAN ATLANTA
RAPID TRANSIT AUTHORITY
808 GLENN BLDG . ' 120 MARIETTA ST . , N.W .
ATLAN T A , GA . 30303 · PHONE 524-571 t
"DIRECTED BY THE GEORGIA STATE
LEGISLATURE TO DEVELOP A RAPID
TRANSIT SYSTEM FOR THE 5 -COUNT.Y
METROPOLITAN ATLANTA AREA.""
Edited by KING ELLIOTT
BOARD OF DIRECTORS
OFFICERS :
RICHARD H. RICH, Chairman
ROY A. BLOUNT, Vice Chairman
ROBERT F. ADAMSON, Treasi,rer
GLENN E. BENNETT, S ecretary
IRT CONVENTION PLANS
Plans for the upcoming Atlanta Convention of the Institute for Rapid Transit are beginning to take shape. The
convention, to be held at the Atlanta Marriott Motor Hotel
May 24-26, will feature full audience participation in special
study sessions, according to George L. DeMent, President
of IRT.
"We are planning another stimulating program that
should be of great interest not only to IRT members, but
also to many other persons concerned with metropolitan
transportation and planning problems of our growing cities
and urban areas," said DeMent, who is Chairman of Chicago Transit Board:
CITY OF ATLANTA:
L. D. M ILTON
MILLS B . LANE, JR.
RAWSON HAVERTY
RICHARD H. RICH
CLAYTON COUNTY:
EDGAR BLALOCK
DEKALB COUNTY:
D R. SANFORD ATWOOD
ROY A. BLOUNT
FULTON COUNTY:
MITCHELL C. BISHOP
W. A. PULVER
GWINNETT COUNTY :
K . A . MCMILLON
COBB COUNTY (Observer)
OTIS A. BRUMBY, JR.
MARTA STAFF:
HENRY L . STUART, General M anager
KING ELLIOTT, Director of P u blic Informat ion
H . N. JOHNSON, S ecretary to Gen eral Manager
"RAPID TRANSIT MUST
HAVE TOP PRIORITY!"
"The development of a rapid transit system is an absolute 'must,' and it must have a top priority if we are
to solve, effectively and permanently, our transportation
problems," said Mitchell C. Bishop, College Park b~sinessman and F ulton County member of the MARTA Board.
Bishop, a former Director of the Division of Traffic and
Safety of the State Highway Department, stated that
"while we have made valiant efforts to solve our traffic
problems, so far we have only been nibbling at the edges
and making piecemeal attacks on our
dilemma!"
"Looking at the situation from an
engineering standpoint," he continued,
"a completed and operating rapid
transit system is the framework
around which we can build all other
solutions to the problem of efficient
and safe transportation inside this
.
.
great Metropolitan Atlanta area. With
Mitchell C. Bishop rapid transit transporting 250,000 to
300,000 persons, mostly commuters, every working day, our
streets, highways, and expressways will be able to accommodate vehicular traffic and to move that traffic more
efficiently."
"Another interesting effect rapid transit will have and
indeed is already having," said Bishop, "is a unifying effect
on all the people of the state. All across the state people
now refer to Atlanta as the home of 'our Braves' and 'our
Falcons' ; and they take great pride in the fact that these
teams belong to all Georgians. I n a similar way, rapid
transit will serve not only the people in its immediate area,
but will benefit all Georgia because of the improvement in
ease of transportation and speed and economy of travel
into and out of our capital city."
"I believe rapid transit will have a tremendous effect
on all of Georgia as well as this area," Bishop concluded.
George L. DeMent
David Q . Gaul
"In addition to our IRT members, we wish to extend
an early invitation to all persons working in the related fields
of metropolitan planning, transportation, and government
to join us in Atlanta for three days of challenging workshopstudy sessions," said DeMent.
"Nationally prominent experts in the urban transportation
fi~ld will present case studies which workshop participants
will analyze. The findings by the participants then will be
reviewed in critiques."
David Q. Gaul, Executive Secretary of the IRT, says
that "plans for the system proposed for Metropolitan Atlanta will also be discussed at the convention, which will
highlight the tremendous resurgence of interest in and development of rapid transit in this country and Canada."
LEGISLATORS'
(Members of the House Appropriations Committee had a number of questions for MARTA representatives on how State aid
would be used; the following are typical questions and answers
from the meeting.)
JAMES H. "SLOPPY" FLOYD, Chairman, House Appropriations
Committee: What do you estimate the total cost of the rapid
transit system ?
HENRY L. STUART, MARTA General Manager : The rapid
transit system that we envision to be operational in the middle
of the 1980's will cost in the neighborhood of 450 million dollars.
By the middle of 1970's we will have an operational system incomplete, and it will have cost approximately }50 million dollars.
As Mr. Coil mentioned, these estimates are now in preparation
in this order of magnitude.
FLOYD: L et m e ask you this. D o the citizens in this area have
to vote on som e bonds?
STUART: If a tax levy is required that will raise the property
taxes, referenda must be held.
FLOYD : What if the citizens of this area defeat the bond? H ow
will the State get their money back?
STUART: Such of the money as has been spent for design purposes will not be recoverable; such of it as is in real estate will be
recoverable depending upon the value of the property.
FLOYD: W hat rate of interest do you think you will have to
pay on 450 million?
STUART: Our financial advisors are basing their plans on 4 and
�SNOW JAMS TRAFFIC-RAPID TRANSIT RUNS
On January 26 and 27, more than 23 inches of snow fell in
Chicago, clogging the streets and freeways with stalled vehicles.
Estimates vary, but the consensus is that more than 15,000 cars
and trucks and 600 busses were stuck. While the street traffic
was stalled, the rapid transit lines and commuter railroads kept
running. "From all reports, the only reliable way of getting around
the city was the elevated-subway system," Associated Press
reported.
An editorial in "RAILWAY AGE" noted, "When nothing else
could move in Chicago, the railroads and the Chicago Transit
Authority rapid-transit lines moved. If ever there was evidence
of rail-transit's ability to combat overwhelming obstacles, if ever
there was proof of the railroads' ability to do the job and damn
the odds, Chicago was it. . .. All the CTA rapid-transit lines did
was to provide in-city residents with dependable transportation
while the freeways froze and hundreds of busses and thousands of
cars wallowed around and foundered . . .. To thousands upon
thousands of grateful people, it was enough."
Snowfalls in the Metropolitan Atlanta area are usually no more
than two or three inches, but street traffic usually becomes virtually
impossible. The advent of rapid transit will make travel possible
even in ice and snow conditions.
QUESTIONS AND MAR-TA'S ANSWERS ...
a quarter percent.
FLOYD: Over a period of how many years?
STUART: 30 Years tax free municipals.
FLOYD : So after paying principal and interest you would pay
about 900 million dollars?
STUART: Yes sir, based on a $450 million bond issue.
FLOYD : Now who is going to actually own this rapid transit
system?
STUART: The MARTA Act of 1965 provides that the title to
the real estate and the rolling stock is vested in the Transit Authority which is an arm of the State.
FLOYD: There's a rumor going around that when this thing is
built the bus line might end up owning all this. ls that true?
STUART: I cannot see that at all. There is no provision in the
Act for that and there is no plan for it.
WILSON B. WILKES, State Budget Officer: I just wanted to ask
Mr. Stuart about $250,000 each year that you requested or that's
been recommended for mass rapid transit. Do you plan to use this
and go ahead and start buying right of way?
STUART: Certain necessary right of way that is necessary to protect our alignments.
WILKES: The building of a transit system itself is going to require
additional tax levy, and that additional tax levy is going to require
a bond election?
STUART: Yes sir.
WILKES: So actually you will acquire property before you do
the other.
STUART: Yes sir.
RODNEY M. COOK, Member, House·Appropriations Committee:
Will you explain to the Committee why you f eel it is necessary to
purchase some of these parcels of land now?
STUART: Yes, for example in Sunday's paper there was an announcement that the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers have put together a p arcel of land near the stadium for a new
office building. T his office building is squarel y astride a piece of
property we were studying as a possible route to the South and
is going to cause us untold expense to re-engineer that South
route. We must have a way to stop this, and the best way is to put
up or shut up.
COOK: ls not also one of the reasons you had to re-engineer
because of the Life of Georgia was built on one of your routes?
STUART: Yes, the Life of Georgia Building at North Avenue and
West Peachtree is an example of the same thing again.
(In answer to a question from a reporter later, Stuart amplified
his comments on the total cost figure of "$900 million including
principal and interest" as used during the committee hearing. )
STUART: One possibility on financing breaks down this way:
if we get the maximum federal funds of 60%, and the maximum
state funds of 10%, this is 70% of the total construction cost.
This would leave 30%, or only about $ 110 million on which interest might be paid. These proportions are possible under existing state and federal legislation.
�Members of th e legislative delegations from MARTA counties breakfast with m embers of the MART A Board of Directors and staff at
Marriott Jan. 24. Some 17 members of the House and 7 m embers of
the Senate heard MA RTA officials discuss plans and progress in the
development of the rapid transit system proposed for M etropolitan
Atlanta. In the picture, Henry L. Stuart, MART A General Manager,
is responding to a question from a legislator. Board Chairman Richard H. Rich presided at the breakfast m eeting.
MARTA ACTION : At the February meeting, the
'Board of Directors ratified the contracts sigiied by
Henry L. Stuart Feb. 2; one contract defined the scope
of the work to be done with the $369,333 grant from
the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; the other contract authorized PBTB engineers
to start the work immediately.
Jeff Wingfield, Planning Director, Atlanta Region
Metropolitan Planning Commission, outlined the need
for strong overall plans for downtown Atlanta, and
the part rapid transit cou ld play in implementing such
a plan.
Henry L. Stuart, MART A General Manager (left), and Congressman Fletcher Thompson, U. S. Representative from Georgia's Fifth
District, discuss some of the proposed rapid tramit lines currently
under study by engineering consultants. Rep. Thompson, visiting in
MARTA offices Feb. 10, said that the U. S. agencies in Washington
he has talked to appear to have a high regard for the work being
done by the Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority.
Collier B. Gladin, City of Atlanta Planning Director,
discussed progress in the Community Improvement
Plan project and work being done to set up a Model
Cities Program. Referring to the impact rapid transit
will have, he urged continued close coordination of
plans and efforts to achieve orderly development of
the great potential of Atlanta.
The next meeting of the MARTA Board of Directors will be Tuesday, March 7, 3:30 p.m., in Conference Room 619, the Glenn Building, 120 Marietta
St. , N . W.
_~.,./
~'-.
/
·...""-...
Hon. lvijn Allen, Jr,, M~yor
City of Atl~rnt~
City Hall
Atlant~, g~. JOJOl
~
I

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