Box 21, Folder 4, Document 13

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Box 21, Folder 4, Document 13

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RAPID TRANSIT
PROGRESS
METROPOLITAN ATLANTA RAPID TRANSIT AUTHORITY
" .LV.L
"'I\ /f"A""C:)rT'1
A
~.L..&:L
REPORTS TO THE PEOPLE IT SERVES.. .
APRIL
I 9 6 7
VOL.11,N0.4
A TALE OF TWO CITIES:
MONTREAL
SAN FRANCISCO
MART A General Manager Henry L. Stuart recently visited Montreal; the fo llowing story summarizes his comments and observations.
MART A Public Information Director King Elliott visited San
Francisco recently, and reports on progress being made by the Bay
Area Rapid Transit District.
The happy citizens of Canada's largest city boast a brand
new subway that they describe as a work of art. After a
close inspection one is inclined to agree. Lines began to
open last October, and April, 1967, saw the end of the
first phase, although extensions are already actively discussed. Are they happy with it? 350,000 riders a day
stick their 25 ¢ magnetic ticket in an automatic turnstile
at one of 26 stations to go for a ride on some part of the
sixteen mile system. Considering Montreal's 2.3 million
population they are heavy users. T hey are proud of their
new subway, too.
Sleek, blue, 9-car trains, set off with a white stripe and
picture windows, run swiftly and quietly (up to 50 miles
· per hour) between bright, airy and colorful stations. They
are rubber tired trains, propelled by electricity, running on
concrete ribbons . T he result is a quiet, smooth r ide, with
a high rate of acceleration that gets the train up to cruising
speed very quickly.
The fourteen station architects went all out to get away
from dungeon-like atmosphere of conventional subways.
Plenty of indirect lighting, mezzanines overlooking the
tracks, and the artful use of color and ceramics did the
trick!
Montreal got its subway by simple determfoation. They
made up their minds that rapid transit in subway was the
answer to their problem, and then the Montrealers proceeded to act on their convictions. In this way rapid transit
came to reality in Montreal in the incredibly short span of
less than five years. There had been talk for 50 years, but
Jean Drapeau, in his mayoralty campaign of 1960 offered
to put a stop to the talk. H e told the voters that if they
"In two-and-a-half years, we will be riding on the world's
most modern rapid transit system, right here in the Bay
Area." This prediction is made confidently by B. R. Stokes,
General Manager of the Bay Area Rapid Transit District
(San Francisco, Alameda (Oakland), and Contra Costa
Counties).
Stokes says that nearly half of the 75-mile, $1 billion,
system is already under construction. Construction Contracts totalling $330 million have been awarded, and work
is under way on 38-route-miles of the system. Included
in these figures are 5 miles of subway, twin tunnels thru
the Berkeley Hills, and the Trans-Bay Tube, "the engineering marvel of the century."
An additional $150-200· million in contracts is expected
to be let by the end of this year .
Two construction projects are complete: tbe 4¼ mile
Diablo Test Track and a 1-mile aerial section in Albany.
In many parts of the Bay Area, construction projects are
under way, and the beginnings of rapid transit are being
observed daily by local residents and commuters.
In several sections of downtown San Francisco, crews
are at work relocating the underground utility lines and
equipment. In most of these areas, one lane of the street
is closed to traffic, but other lanes are still in use. Work
continues on the building of the 57 tube sections which will
be required for the 4 ½ mile tube underneath the Bay between San Francisco and Oakland. The steel shells are
built at the Bethleh em Ship Yard , and are floated to a
nearby pier for outfitting. The first of the sections are in
place in the mud at the bottom of the Bay, and the schedule
calls for another section to be completed every two weeks.
(Continued on Page 2)
(Continued on Page 3)
I
I
I
Monttealers make heavy use of th eir new subway. This picture,
taken at JEAN TALON shows passengers crossing the platform
from train to exit. Bi-lingual signs are universal in Mon·treal.
Temporary decking over subway construction.
�M NTREAL ...
(Continued from Page I, Column I)
would vote for him he would build them a fine new: subway.
They did, and he did.
Mayor Drapeau junked 50-year-old plans and turned to
the Paris Metro for the basic engineering and design criteria.
Indeed, officials from the Paris Metro came to Montreal
to guide the work. In 1961 the City Council authorized
the first of $213 million of general revenue bonds, and
Mayor Drapeau told. his Montreal Public Works Department to get busy.
Digging began in 1962 and the Montrealers rode to
town in 1966! They blasted 70 percent of the tunnels
out of solid rock, and after being lined with concrete it was
23 feet wide and 16 feet high. Their tunnels range from
20 feet deep to 90 feet deep in the earth. Hundreds of
speedy escalators solve the problems of getting out of the
stations. MARTA General Manager, Hank Stuart, who
attended a Rail Committee Meeting of the American Transit Association in Montreal recently reported, "The speed
of the engineering and construction of this system is more
than remarkable, but it fades into the background when
you open your eyes and take in the beauty of a system
that was clearly designed to give its customers a treat. I am
impressed. It looks good, it runs smoothly, and it's there."
An up-to-date signal and power distribution system provide a safe, dependable operation which is a must for modern, high speed and safe transportation. Two men operate
each train riding on opposite ends, taking turns running
the equipment.
A total of 369 of the rubber-tired rapid transit cars have
been purchased at an average cost of $123,000. The Metro
operates 9-car trains at all times, \Vith 2½ minute headways
foring rush hours, and 5 minute headways at other times.
The maximum capacity of each line in each direction past
a given point is estimated at 57,600 passengers per hour.
This is based on ·160 p,assengers per car and nine-car trains
at the rate of 40 trains per hour.
Line No. I, running 4.3 miles east and west, and Line No.
2, running 8.6 miles north and south, were opened for passengers October 14, 1966. On the first week-end of service,
over one and one-half million passengers rode the system.
Line No. 4 connects with Expo 67, the 1967 World Exhibition commemorating Canada's centennial as an independent
nation. Plans for the missing Line No. 3 have been suspended indefinitely.
Did the Montrealers appreciate what was done for them?
They re-elected Mayor Drapeau by a whopping majority,
and gave his party 45 of the 48 seats on the city governing
body.
T he examp le of M elro Station architecture at Sh erbroo ke illustra tes
th e beautiful use . o f light an d ceramics to provide a feeling o f
spacious cheerfulness. (This picture was ta ken before passengers
were being accepted).
The M ezzanin e concourse at JARRY is anoth er example of how
light and spaciousness get one away from th e o ld-fashioned "gopherhole" subway station.
This -view of CR EMAZIE looking do wn from an open m ez zanin e
co n veys the feeling of fr ee and uncramped m o vem ent.
T unn els 0 11 the Metro are ligh ted all th e ll'ay for safety an d com fort.
Note th e signal (upper right) that provides the train operator ll'ith
in dications abollt the track ahead.
�SAN FRANCISCO ...
(Continued from Page I, Column 2)
Subway construction in Oakland; steel form for subway shell in
place on right.
A /most- comp/et~d construction on translfl on section of subway;
constmction goes from cut-and-cover subway to ground level track.
Co111p /e1ed section of aerial structure, with landscaped "lin ear
park" beneath.
The major part of the construction work actually underway now is across the Bay in the Oakland Area. In addition to the Test Track and the completed aerial section in
Albany, other projects are in varying stages of completion in
downtown Oakland. One section of the cut-and-cover subway is virtually completed, with only the rails and other
equipment to be installed. Excavation work is in progress
in several of the streets, including Broadway, one of the
principal downtown thoroughfares . In order to maintain
as efficient a flow of traffic as possible, the tunnels are
" boarded over" and traffic is permitted above while work
continues below. All stages of this type of construction are
visible now. The utilities are first dug up and relocated;
the ditching is accomplished and the vertical beams and retaining walls are installed. Horizontal beams are then put
into place; wooden decking (boards about 12 by 6 inches
bolted together and laid edgewise) is installed; and traffic
is restored.
F arther out, construction has begun on sections of the
Grove-Shafter Freeway, with the BART lines running down
the median. Much of the area has been cleared, and bridges
have been started. BART officials point out that considerable savings will be made by both the Highway Department
and BART because of the economic advantages of joint
planning and development of the freeway-rapid transit complex. Some 15 miles of the BART lines will occupy joint
right of way with the freeway.
In other areas, crews "holed thru" the second of the
Berkeley H ills Tunnels ; va rious test procedures are in progress at the test track ; and landscaping of aerial structure
continues.
The 75 mile system is being financed with proceeds from
a $792 million bond issue and $ 180 million in state fund s
fro m Bridge tolls. BART is now seeking ways of meeting a
$200 million "over-run", which resul ted from excess ive inflation, construction delays because of litigation , and changes
in original proposals. BART officials are confident that
the necessary funds will be secured, and that trains will run
as scheduled in late 1969.
INSTITUTE FOR RAPID TRANSIT CONVENTION
May 24-26, 1967-Atl anta Marriott Motor Hotel
AMERICAN TRANSIT ASSOCIATION
CONVENTION
Oct. 22-26, 1967, Atlanta Regency-Hyatt H ouse
Full-scale mock-up of car to be used in BART system.
�COUNTIES HONOR MARTA
METROPOLITAN ATLANTA
RAPID TRANSIT AUTHORITY
The Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority has
received the "Meritorious Award" of the Association
County Commissioners of Georgia for its multiple county
service to Clayton, DeKalb, Fulton, and Gwinnett Counties
and to the City of Atlanta.
Richard H. Rich, MARTA Chairman, accepted the
award at the Annual meeting of the ACCG at Jekyll Island
April 4.
806 GLENN B LDG .• 120 MAR I ETTA S T . , N. W .
A TL ANTA. GA . 30303 • P H ONE 524 - 5711
" DIRECTED BY THE GEORGI A STATE
LEGISLATURE TO DEVELOP A RAPID
TRANSIT SYSTEM FOR THE S·COUNT.Y
METROPOLITAN ATLANTA AREA . "
Edited by KING ELLIOTr
BOARD OF DIRECTORS
OFFICERS:
RICHARD
H.
RICH,
Chairman
ROBERT F. ADAMSON, Treasurer
ROY
A.
BLOUNT,
Vic e Chairnian
GLENN E. BENNETr, S ecr etary
CITY OF ATLANTA:
M ILLS B. LANE, JR.
L . D. M ILTO N
RICHARD H. RICH
RAWSON HAVERTY
CLAYTO N COUNTY:
EDGAR BLALOCK
DEKALB COUNTY:
Roy A. BLOUNT
D R. SA NFORD ATWOOD
w.
F ULTON COUNTY:
A. PULVER
M ITCHELL C. BISHOP
GW I NNETT COUNTY:
K. A. MCMILLON
COBB COUNTY (Observer)
OTIS A. BRUMBY, JR .
MARTA STAFF:
HENRY L . STUART, Gen eral Manag er
KING ELLIOTT, Direc tor of P1tblic Information
H. N. JOHNSON, S ecretary to General Manager
A CCG President Dr. Bruce Schaefer presents award to MART A
Chairman Richard H. Rich .
MARTA ACTION
In accepting the award, Rich outlined the progress which
has been made through the cooperative efforts of the five
governments in establishing the Authority, securing a basic
staff, and beginning preliminary engineering on the system.
He described the rapid transit project as one in which "four
counties and a city, each with varying and extensive needs
and problems of its own, have united their efforts and resources to solve a problem common to them all ... that of
providing rapid and comfortable transportation for their
citizens."
Rich noted that the State of Georgia has now joined into
partnership with the four counties and the city by appropriating $500,000 for MARTA, and concluded, "With the
continued support of our counties, I am thoroughly convinced that we not only CAN, but WILL, complete this
absolutely and vitally needed rapid transit system."
At the April 4 meeting, the Board of Directors of the
Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority instructed
the General Manager to explore the possibility of extending
the West Line to serve the new "Six Flags Over Georgia"
amusement park, and to report his findings at the May
Board meeting.
The observation was made that similar study should be
given to possible future service to the Stone Mountain
Memorial Park.
Chairman Richard H. Rich reported on the presentation
of The Meritorious Award of the Association County Commissioners of Georgia; the ACCG presented the award to
MART A for its multiple county service to the four counties and city composing the Authority.
The next meeting of the Board of Directors is to be held
Tuesday, May 2, 1967 , at 3:30 p.m. in Room 619, the
Glenn Building, 120 Marietta, St. N. W.
-'
U. S. Postage
PROGRESS
Atlanta, Ga.
Permit No. 20
PAID
METROPOLITA N ATL ANTA RAPID TRANSIT A UTHORITY
BOB GLENN BLDG . · 120 MARIETTA ST .. N . W .
PHONE 524-5711 (AREA CODE 404)
APRIL
1 967,
VOL.
II,
NO.
·
ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30303
4
Mr. R. Earl La ~ders
AJmi~. Asst. to the Mayor
206 City Hall
Atla~ta, G~.
~1
BULK RATE
R.A..PID TR.A..NSIT
,o)O~

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