Box 8, Folder 22, Complete Folder

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Box 8, Folder 22, Complete Folder

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SERVICES
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FACT:
Sanitation service would be improved and would
cost less if Sandy Springs joined Atlanta. In
addition to two garbage collections each week,
residents would receive other services now
available only within the city limits : rubbish
pickup, street cleaning, gutter cleaning, and
sanitary inspection.
Sandy Springs now has two rates for residential
garbage collection, $28 or $35 a year, depending
on location . Inside the city the maximum residential charge is $22 a year .
FACT:
Water bills inside the city are one-half those
outside the city . Most homes and businesses in
Sandy Springs already get _their water from the
city under on arrangement between the city and
the county. However, users outs ide the city are
billed at a double __ rote . The minimum monthly
rote inside Atlanta is $1.57; outside it is $3. 14.
Therefore, the annual savings on water bills
in the city is at least $18.84. And since most
homes use~than the minimum water supply,
savings for most people would be even greater .
FACT:
If your home is already on a sewer line, you
would c ontinue rec eiving re gular servic e with
no change s or spe cial charges . Th e re is strong
likelihood of a sewer service charge in the city
to help finance its part of the metropolitan
s ewer system . Si nee Fu Iton County is port of
the sy s tem, it would hove to raise it s portion
of the f inanc ing by a sewe r serv ice c harge or
o t he r me an s .
If your home is now served by a working septic
tan k, you wou Id be affecte d only if a ne w sewer
l ine we re ext~nde d to you r s treet . Thi s is al wa y s by pe ti t ion of res ide nts . If, aft e r nei ghborhood petition, you rece ived sewe r servi ce for
t he f irs t ti me, y our property wo uld be a ssessed
a t th e re g ular $3 .50 pe r front foot rate plus $80
to $120 for connecting your home to the sewer
line. You would be given up to s ix years to pay
the assessment.
This assessment system a Iready exists in the
county as well as in the city . In other words,
whether Atlanta or the county improves the
sewer system, assessments wi II be charged.
FACT:
While most streets in Sandy Springs are in good
or average condition, there ore some below
average streets. The city has pledged to assign
a high priority to re-surfacing these streets
within the next year. The cost of re-surfacing
and maintoinence of already paved st-reets is
borne .by the city. In it ial paving of streets and
sidewalks in the city is done only after neighborhood petition . Assessments for sidewalks
is about $2°.60 per front foot, and property
owners may take up to 4 years to pay . Charges
for street paving and .curbing range from $6 .50
to $7 .50 per front foot and owners ore allowed
up to 10 years to pay for street paving and
5 years for curbing .
Sidewalks in front of schools ore installed at
city expense with no petition required . At
present two schools 1n Sandy Spr ings ore
withou t sidewalks,
••••••
SANITATION, SEWERAGE, WATER SERVICE,
STREETS AND SIDEWALKS . . . THES E ARE
BASIC BUSINESS AND RESIDENTIAL NEEDS.
GIVE SANDY SPRINGS TH E ADV ANT AG ES OF
IMPROV ED AND EXPANDED CITY SERVIC ES.
VOT E "Y E S"
MAY 11
�Howard Starks & Matt Connor, Co-Chairmen
6125 Roswell Road, N.E. / Phone: 252-2324
J
[ Sandy Springs / Atlanta
Team for Tomorrow
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Advise me the status of the attached.
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ATLANTA,GE:OROIA
Ma y 2
From Peggy Baker
Dea r Ea r l:
Here is l a te s t h ot s c o op fr om Sa ve Sand y
Springs . It is r ath er _hapha zardly put
together, but wil l probably ca use us
additiona l t r ouble .
We wil l be on two more TV forums next
weekend , and I gu e ss we shou ld prob e
this l atest ga r bage and se e i f we shou l d
hit back on a nything.
Please look it over and mark in red or make
marginal notes on anything you think
especia lly harmfu l .
I will not be around Tuesday, so if you
will, please call Bill Parr, 521-0845,
and he will pickup your copy with any
comments you may have. Extra copy is
for you .
We still need something d~amatic to spring,
but don ' t have anything definite in mind .
Radio spots (which are good ) will begin
Wed . and we have some TV stuff working ,
on a documentary basis, pointing up SS
defi c i enc es . Any sugg e s tions wi ll be
appreciated.
PB
FOR M 25-9
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521-0845
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OF
COMMERCE
1300 COMMERCE BUILDING • ATLANTA. GEORGIA
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BUCKHEAD
�IT APPEARS THAT THERE ARE CERTAIN INCORRECT RUMORS CIRCULATING ABOUT WHAT HAPPENED
IN BUCKHEAD AFTER IT BECAME PART OF AT LANT A . AN UNDERSTANDING OF THE FACTS WILL
CLARI FY MANY OF THESE MISCONCEPTIONS .
Rumor .
boxes have been installed and the
entire alarm system improved . In
addition, Buckhead has had the services of all city fire inspectors since
1952 . As a result of these improvements, fire insurance rates in some
portions of Buckhead were lowered
from Class 6 to Class 3 within a few
months after Buckhead ' s joining the
city, and the entire annexed area had
been brought up to Class 3 standards,
with resulting fire insurance reduc tions, within 18 months .
. Propertytaxes were doubled or tripled
after Buckhead joined Atlanta .
Fact . . . . By a legislati ve act in 1951, the
Georgia General Assembly d ir ected
that Fulton County make a reappraisal
of a 11 property in the county and the
City of Atlanta, including that portion
of Atlanta in DeKalb County . The
same act required that Fu Iton County
pay the cost of the reappraisal program in Fulton and that a one-mill tax
be levied on all property in Fulton
County for one year to cover the cost
of reappraisal. (Atlanta paid the
county $15,000 for the cost of reappraisal in the DeKalb County portion
of the c ity . )
As provided by the act, the findings
of the reappri::I i sa I program were submitted in 1955 and put into effect on
January 1, 1956 . The result was that
property taxes were EQUALIZED
THROUGHOUT THE CITY AND
COUNTY. Some property taxes did go
up as a result of the equalization,but
the taxes on many properties were
LOWERED .
Rumor .
Buckhead property values have gone
down .
Fact ..
Since 1952 Buckhead has experienced
a tremendous rise in property values,
due in part to Atlanta ' s strictly enforced zol")ing standards and classifications . Buckhead is now considered
to be one of Atlanta ' s finest residential
areas, including eight new
subdivisions
already bu il t, with
others in the planning stage. Furthermore, the new governor ' s mansion will
be located in Buckhead .
Rumor . . . No changes were made in Buckhead's
fire protection and prevention
facilities.
Fact . . . . Four new fire stations have been
constructed to serve the annexed
area since 1951, one of them a short
fime after the Plan of Imp roveme nt
went into effect . Twenty new alarm
Rumor .
. Buckhead has inadequate parks and
recreat ional and serv ice foci lities .
Fact . .. . The city has bui It Bagley Park, one
of the best smal I sports parks in
Atlanta . It has bui It baseball d iamonds lighted for n ight use, built
numerous tennis courts, enlarged and
improved Ida Wi Iii ams Library, and
developed Chasta in Amph itheater as
one of the South ' s outstand ing outdoor entertainment centers , In the way
of services, the c ity has added a
$1,000,000watertank and $300,000 in
new water mains in the Buckhead
Area to guarantee a h igh le vel of f ire
protection as well as to meet the
other water needs of c itize ns .
Rumor .
Buckhead has had no v o ice in its own
government since entering the city .
Fact ..
The two aldermen from the Buckhead
Area serve on a tot a I of 13 different
alderman ic comm ittees, and they serve
as chairman or vice chairman of several of these committees, including
the Zan ing Comm ittee, the Urban Renewa I Pol icy Comm itt ee , the Planning
and Development Comm ittee, and the
Parks Comm ittee . Additionally, Buck head c itizens have the satisfaction of
knowing they pro vi de a high percentage of Atlanta ' s top leadership , . .
in cluding its Mayor .
WHAT HAPPENED IN BUCKHEAD CAN HAPPEN
IN SANDY SPRINGS UNLESS SANDY SPRINGS
DECIDES TO GO IT ALONE.
V OT E
"Y E S"
MA Y
11
�Howard Starks & Mat~ Connor, Co-Chairmen
6125 Roswell Road, N.E. / Phone: 252-2324
J
[ SandJ Springs / Atlanta
Team for Tomorrow
II
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REPRESENTATION IN
LOCAL GOVERNMENT
�F A CT:
FA CT
The Sandy Springs Area is governed by three
county commissioners who represent the entire
county and not any particular section . At present,
none of the commissioners resides in the Sandy
Spr ings Area . The Ful_ton County School Board
is not elected but is appointed by the Grand
Jury.
At present, Sandy Spr ings res idents are unable
to partic ipate in election of city off icials or on
programs undertaken by the c ity, although they
are directly affected in many ways by the results
of these ele cti ons . Upon coming into the c ity
Sandy Spr ings residents would be able to vote
in elect ions in v ol v ing c ity offices and city
issues .
FACT:
FA CT :
If the Sandy Springs Area joins Atlanta, it will
enter the City as the new Ninth Ward. Representation would include 2 Aldermen, l member of
the Boa rd of Education . . . . al I elected by
Ninth Ward voters in an election in November,
1967 .. . . al I residing in the N inth Ward.
Sandy Springs would also be represented on
various city boards . Through appo intment of its
alde rmen to var ious alderman ic comm ittees, including zon ing, it would ha ve a vo ice in matte rs
concern ing Sandy Spr ings spec if ica l ly , and the
city as a whole . In add ition , citizens of Sandy
Springs also would ha ve an opportun it y to s e rve
on var ious appointed comm itt e es and comm iss ions .
FAC T:
F AC T:
Beginning with the 1969 city election, these
representatives would be elected by city-wide
vote. Howeve r, candidates wou Id sti 11 have to
be residents of the wards they represent . In
other words, Sandy Spr ings representatives would
ha ve to be Sandy Springs residents .
A h igh pe rcentage of Sandy Springs re sidents
earn the ir liv e lihood in the C it y of Atlan t a . Th e y
depend on Atlanta for many s er vices , and us e
many c it y fac i l it ie s . Th e re for e, it seem s re ason abl e tha t they s hould ha ve a voice in th e gov e rn ment of Atlanta . At pre s ent, they do not.
••••••
FACT:
Since Sandy Spr ing s has a far smaller population
than any other c ity Ward, its proport ionat e repres e nta t ion would be great e r t han tha t of other
Wa rds . Fo r t his reason , Ward realignment would
be a futu re prob a bil ity . But Sandy Springs pe opl e
sti 11 wou Id have repr e senta t ive s from their own
s e c t ion of t he City
SAN DY SPR INGS RESIDENTS ARE DIR ECT LY
AFFECTED BY
ATLANTA' S CIT Y GO VERNMENT .
BUT THEY CANNOT EXPRESS THE IR
OPINIONS ON THE ISSUES INVOLVED.
LET YOUR VOICE BE HEARD IN ATLANTA
V OT E "Y E S" MA Y 1 1
�Howard Starks & Matt Connor, Co-Chairmen
6125 Roswell Road, N.E. / Phone: 252-2324
[ Sandy Springs / Atlanta)
Team for Tomorrow
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FIRE AND POLICE
PROTECTION
�POLICE
PROTECTION
FACT:
If Sandy Sp~ings became a part of Atlanta, it
would receive the full-service police protection
given a heavily populated urban area, instead of
its present rural police service. This expanded
protection would include:
• patrolmen on duty in the business district
• motorcycle patrolmen on traffic and patrol duty
• unlimited services and facilities of Atlanta's
Juven.ile . Crime Prevention Squad and special
Detective Department
• increased radio patrol service*


This increased service follows the present


trend toward mobility in police protection
via two - way patrol cars. In accordance with
the trend, no additional precinct stations
ore planned for the city, nor would they be
planned for Sandy Springs at present .
FACT:
Atlanta now has about 1.5 uniformed policemen
for every 1,000 population and hopes to increase
that ratio, giving more protection to the entire
city. Compare this ratio with only .5 per 1,000 in
Sandy Springs.
FACT:
At present, the only laws enforceable in Sandy
Springs are state laws, most of them designed to
cover rural areas. Violators of state laws are
turned over to the Fulton County sheriff for trial
in a state court. If Sandy Springs joined Atlanta,
city ordinances as well as state laws would be
enforced as they now are in Atlanta.
FIRE
PROTECTION ,
FACT:
Atlanta has a Class3 fire protection rating which
compares favorably with other cities of similar
size . This means city fire protection is good,
based on number and location of fire stations,
ample water supply in all areas, and number of
men and eng ines. It also means fire insurance
rates in the Atlanta area are considerably lower
than in Sandy Springs, since fire premiums are
based .on the rating of the district.
FACT:
Sandy Springs has two different fire ratings,
neither of which is equal to Atlanta's . Class 6
rating covers the area south of Dalrymple Road,
which is the fire district . . . and Class 10
covers the area outside the fire district.
FACT:
Sandy Springs' present fire ratings mean .. .
• higher fire insurance rates
• less adequate fire protection
Sandy Springs' fire protection is furnished by
one fire station equipped with one fully manned
engine company, plus another fully manned
engine company operating out of a city fire station on Northside Drive. Emergency back-up
assistance is available from the Northside
Drive Station and a station in Buckhead. Fire
protection for the Sandy Springs fire district is
furnished under a contract with Atlanta, for which
residents of the fire district pay a 4.5 mill tax.
FACT:
A preliminary study of Sandy Springs indicates
the following would be required to bring the area
up to Class 3 standards permanently:
• 3 new fire stations
• replacement of 2 existing engines
• l new engine and l new ladder true k
• approximately 35 additional men
FACT:
Atlanta's good fire protection rating depends on
maintenance of top quality fire fighting facilities
throughout the city. Once Sandy Springs joined
Atlanta, the city would have to bring the Sandy
Springs area up to Class 3 requirements . . . or
jeopordize the excellent rating now enjoyed by
the entire city.
FACT:
Fire prevention as well as protection would be
improved if Sandy Springs joined Atlanta .
• At present, the county has no fire inspectors.
Once Sandy Springs joined Atlanta, it would
have the services of city fi re inspectors and
fire investigators, including arson specialists
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(or investigators ) . . . plus the benefits of
Atlant-a's fire prevention program. At the present time, ·arson in vestigation in the Sandy
Spr ings fire distr ict is accomplished through
the State Fire Ma rshal's office.
• High standards of train ing and supervision
w ith in the city would also be contributing
factors toward fire pre vent ion and protection.
• In case of s e r ious emergency, Sandy Springs
would have the back-up protection of the ent ire
c ity fire department , not only its own local
fire fight ing fac i l ities.
••••
GOOD FIRE and POLICE PROTECTION
ARE BASIC COMMUNITY and FAMILY NEEDS.
SANDY SPRINGS MUST NOT SETTLE FOR LESS
THAN THE BEST IN THESE IMPORTANT AREAS.
Howard Starks & Matt Connor, Co-Chairmen
6125 Roswell Road, N.E. / Phone: 252-2324
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FIRST CLASS
PERMIT NO. 4908
ATLANTA, GA.
BUSINESS REPLY CARD
N o POSTAGE STAMP N ECESSARY IF MAI LED I N T l-I E UNITED STATES
Charles L. Davis
Comptroller
City of Atlanta
City Hall
Atlanta, Georgia 30303


�Gentlemen:

I
Please furnish me with a comparison of ad valorem taxes on the
following property:
Location of property: _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __
Name in which property
was returned for 1965
Fulton County tax: _ __ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __
In the event you need additional information, I may be reached
at telephone _ __ _ _ _
(Note: Please address the attached post card to yourself.)
�Dear Resident of Sandy Springs:
On property located a.___ ______ _________
your 1965 Fulton County ad valorem taxes were._ _ _ _ __
If your property had been located in the Atlanta City limits as of
January 1, 1965, your City of Atlanta and Fulton County taxes
would have bee.~-----Note: In addition , you should take into considera tion that your wa ter bill for
the year would have been reduced by 50 %, your sa nitary service charge
would have been a maxjmum of $2 2 fo r the year, you would have a savings
on F ederal and State income taxes, and also you would have a savings in
your fire insurance (contact your insurance agent for this info rm ation).
___j
�TAXES
�FACT:
Property taxes would be higher inside the city,
but the increase would be largely offset by
reductions in water b i lls, sanitation service
charges, and fire insurance . Net result: a
modest total increase in taxes. All property
VALUE of HOME
I. $ 16,360
11.
28,160
ASSESSMENT
Co.
City
Co.
C i ty
43,000
Co.
City
PERSONAL
PROPERTY TAX
WATER
BILL
SANITATION
135.84
215.73
30.49
28.90
93.16
46.96
28.00
22. 00
+ 79. 89
- 1.59
- 46.20
- 6.00
305.46
414.58
79. 36
75.22
93.16
46.96
35.00
22.00
109.12
- 4.14
- 46.20
- 13. 00
518.79
663.82
87.99
83.40
69.07
34.75
28.00
22.00
t 145.03
- 4.59
- 34.32
- 6.00
4,090
5,720
7,040
9, 860
10,750
15,040
The fol lowing actual examples are from a random
survey of Sandy Springs Homes.
REAL ESTATE
TAX
t
Ill.
assessments in the city and county are made
by the Jo int Board of Assessors in accordance
with the formula established in 1956.
NET
CHANGE
+ 26. 10
+ 45.78
+
100. 12
FACT:
FACT:
Federa l and state income tax returns allow for
deduction of local tax payments. The major part
of th e increase in property taxes would be
recovered through income tax deductions.
Ta king into consideration increased property
ta xes, reduced water and sanitation bill s, reduced fire ins urance premiums, the home own e rs
in the examples above wou ld pay the follow ing
add itional amounts annually if Sandy Spr ings
joined Atlanta:
FACT:
The City of Atlanta ha s a Class 3 fire rating,
refl e cting its high quality fire fighting facilitie s.
Sandy Springs, with less fire protection , is rate d
Class 6 . Since the cost of fire insurance is
based in part on the rat i ng of the district,
pre miums would be reduced if Sandy Springs
became part of Atlanta. Th e following figures
are for the same homes used in the example s
above , a ss um ing these are a l I brick ve neer
hom es which receive th e lowest ins uran ce rates.
Pre mium cost s cover straight fire ins urance only.
Volue of
Home
Clo ss 3 Annuol
Fire ln suronce
Premium
Closs 6 Annuol
Fire In suran ce
Premium
I.
11.
$16, 360
28, 160
30.00
46. 00
111.
43, 000
44 .00
67.00
$20.00
$29. 00
I.
$17. 10
II.
29.78
Ill.
77.12
These figures do not take into consideration
deductions allowed on state and federal income
ta x returns .
• ••
INCREASED FIRE and POLICE PROTECTION;
BETTER ZONING;
CHEAPER WATER , SA NITATION
ond F IR E INSURANCE;
EXP ANDED SCHOOL FAC ILITI ES.
THESE ARE SOME OF THE AD V ANTAGES OF
LIV ING IN T H E CITY .
WHAT A RE THEY WO RTH A Y EAR TO YOU ond
YOU R FAMILY?
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[ SandJ Springs / Atlanta
Team forTomorrow
II
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�_Memo
DATE
From CHARLES L. DAVIS
To
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�This 1s the comp leted renort on the
comnarRtive tax r e tes.
Ed h Hs
the origin el .
I have sent Jim
K~ng of the ~hamber of Commerce a
copy .
George
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�521-0845
CURTIS
ATL.ANTA
H.
DRISKELL
CHAMBER
OF
COMMERCE
1300 COMMERCE BUILDING • ATLANTA, GEORGIA
�QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS
Sandy Springs Referendum
May 11, 1966
Prepared for
Sandy Springs/ Atlanta
Team for Tomorrow
The facts and figu.res in this booklet have been thoroughly checked and approved by the City of Atlanta .
�PREFACE
Atla nta ' s reputation as a major busine ss, cultural, social, and
industrial c e nter didn't develop by ac c ident.
It is a product
of t hou ght f ul planning b y imaginat i ve people who poo l ed ideas,
efforts and resourc e s.
Part of the secret o f our ar e a's new
a n d ex citing promise is simple reco gnition of the fact that
p eop le wo rking together toward a g oal ar e more e f fective tha n
people worki ng i n fragme nt e d div isions.
In t h e r ef er endum o f Ma y 11, the p e ople of Sandy Spring s will
be offered an o ppor tun i t y to join i n the adventure o f helping
build a unique a n d remarkable c ity.
For Sandy Spring s resident s , the quest ion at issue i s not me rely
"How would corning into the c ity affect taxes, or schools, or
rep r esentation in local government? "
these are important.
Though , o f cou rse, a l l
The l arger que st ion is "How can Sa ndy
Sp rin g s take full advantage of, and get i t s share of the rewards
of the t remendous economic, cultural, and industrial boom now
gripping Atlanta?"
An d the answe r is ..• by b e coming an integral part of the city.
By participating i n its l eader ship.
By see ing t h e v i sion o f a
great, and con tinually greater Atlanta.
By joining in the grand
enterprise of full p ar tic ipa tion in the invig orating p r esent
and the stimulatin g fut u re of one great c ity .
Atlanta is an at titude .• . not an a r ea.
�The following letter text attests to the accuracy of the material in
this booklet:
March 16, 1966
Atlanta Chamber of Commerce
Gentlemen:
We have carefully studied the report of the Committee on
Annexation of the Atlanta Chamber of Commerce as revised March 14
'
1966 entitled "Questions and Answers on Proposed Sandy Springs
Annexation" and find no inaccurate statements of fact therein.
In accordance with our previous statement of policy this
letter is not to be construed as an endorsement of annexation. We
have agreed to cooperate with the Chamber of Commerce in editing
this report solely for-·purpose of guaranteeing the citizens of Sandy
Springs the opportunity to make their decision on the question of
annexation based on an accurate and unbiased knowledge of the facts.
Sincerely,
George H. Ivey, Jr., President
Greater Sandy Springs Association
�CONTENTS
Page
..... ...... .
1
A Compar i son o f Taxes . . . . . . . . • . . . . . • . .
3
Represen tation i n Lo cal Governmen t
. . . • • . • . . .
5
• • . . . . . . . . . . . . . . •
7
.......
9
Police Protection . . . • . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
11
Sanitation Service
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
12
Water Service .
. .
• . . . . .
• • • . , . . . . . . •
13
Sch ools • • .
.
• .
. . . . . • . . . • . . . . . • . .
14
Sewers
.
.
. .
. .
15
Str e e t Lights and Traffic Signa l s . . . . . . . . • . .
16
Street s a n d Side wa lks • . . . . · • • . . . . . . • . .
17
Map •
IBC
. . . . . . .
Ad Valorem Taxes
Growth a nd Zonin g • .
. . .
Fire Pro t e ction and Fire I nsurance
. .
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
• .
.
• • · • ·
.
.
.

.
• • • · • · · . .
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
�The following questions and answers cover the main issues involved i n
the May 11 referendum. For answers to more specific and individual
questions, contact Sandy Springs/Atlanta Team for Tomorrow, 6125
Roswell Road, N.E., Sandy Springs Shopping Center, Telephone 252-23 24,
252-2325, or 252-2326.
AD VALOREM TAXES
Q. - What would happen to my tax bill?
How much more would it cost me
to receive the improved services inside the city ?
A. - The ad valorem taxes on your home would be higher i nside the city,
but the increase in taxes would be largely offset by r eductions in
other charges. In almost every case, the net result would be only
a moderate increase in the total.
As an example, consider the effect on one of the homes t aken from
a random survey of Sandy Springs residences. The example is a
single-family frame dwelling on Dalrymple Road. Its v alu e, for
tax purposes, is $38,400. The 1965 Fulton County real estate tax
b{ll (exclusive of personal property) on this property was $452 .6 6.
If the home had been inside the city, the county and city tax combined would have been $586.42, an increase of $133.76.
This increase in ad valorem taxes would hav e been l a r gely off s et
by lower charges in three areas: Wa t e r , s a nitation serv ice and
fire insurance. The actual water bill for this residence l a s t
year was $94.62, which is very close to the average b i ll s h own in
a survey of some 55 homes. Inside th e city , the water bill would
have been $47.70, a decrease of $46 . 92 . The sanitat ion service
cha r g e would have been $22.00 inst ead of $35. 00, for another saving
of $13. 00.
It is more difficult to arrive at the precise s aving po ss ible in
lower insurance rates f or this homeowner, because of the several
different types of insurance he might choo se. But a good estimate
c an be obtained by c omparing t he rates for straight fire insurance
on his dwelling . Si nce t h e value of hi s lot makes up part of the
tota l valu e of his pr opert y, assume that his dwelling is valued at
$3 2 ,000 of the $38 ,400 t otal . Straight fire insurance on this
amount would be $95 . 40 in the Sandy Springs Fire District, which
has a Class 6 r a ting. I nside Atlanta, wh i ch has a Class 3 rating,
the s ame ins urance wou l d cost $55 . 20, a difference of $40.20. (If
the home were a few bl oc ks beyond Dalrymple Road, outside the fire
dis t rict, the same policy would cost $296.60.)
Thus, in t he exampl e , an a d valorem tax increase of $133.76 would
be offset by sav i ng s o f $46.92 (water), $13.00 (sanitation) and
$40.20 (fire ins urance ) , a total of $100.12. The net difference
would be only $33.64 if the home were inside the city.
Another "intangible" saving will work to the benefit of homeowners
when they file federal and state income taxes. Both federal and
s t ate income tax procedures allow local tax payments to be claimed
as a "deduction." Payments for such items as water and insurance
- 1 -
�are not "deductible." This means that the homeowner inside the
city - whose property taxes are higher and other charges lower can deduct a greater portion of his total payments for income tax
purposes.
The net effect on his income tax bill would vary, of course, depending on the income bracket and other factors.
But a conservative
estimate is that the typical homeowner could reduce his combined
federal and state income taxes by about 20 per cent of the additional amount deductible for ad valorem taxes.
In other words, the
taxpayer in the example shown above could deduct $133.76 more if
he were inside the city, and the estimated saving on his income
taxes would be $26.75.
Considering all aspects of his taxes and charges, the homeowner
cited in the example would actually pay about $7.00 more per year
for the advantages of being inside the city.
- 2 -
�A COMPARISON OF TAXES AND CHARGES
FOR SEVERAL TYPICAL
HOMEOWNERS
(Sandy Springs - City of Atlanta)
In the following examples - all of which are actual residences in a random survey of Sandy Springs homes the ad valorem taxes, water bill and sanitation charges paid in 1965 are compared with what the same items
would have been if the homes had been inside the corporate limits of the City of Atlanta. The "net change"
shown does not reflect the saving in fire insurance, which would range from a few dollars to a substantial
amount, depending on type of dwelling, location of the residence, type of insurance carried, etc. The
change also does not include the savings on Federal Income Tax deductions. See page 1, last paragraph.
Value of
Home
Example !fl
$23,680
w
Example 112
Example 11 3
Example 114
Example !I S
20,720
33',880
16,360
11,960
Assessment
Real Estate
Tax
Co. $ s, 920
City 8,280
$ 241.06
338.82
Co.
City
5,180
7,250
Co.
8,470
City 11,850
Co.
City
Co.
City
4,090
5,7 20
2,990
4,1 80
Personal
Property Tax
$
71.31
65.59
Water Bill
$
79.29
39.93
Sanitation .
$
Net Change
28.00
22.00
+ 97.76
5.72
- 39.36
6.00
198.51
289.21
35. 08
33.25
53.01
26.61
28.00
22.00
+ 90. 70
1. 83
- 26.40
6.00
387.69
510.44
166.76
158.06
129.66
65.46
28.00
22.00
+122.75
8.70
- 64.20
6.00
135.84
215. 73
30.49
28.90
93.16
46. 96
28.00
22.00
+ 79.89
1. 59
- 46. 20
6.00
72. 59
141. 70
31. 05
29. 43
38.41
19.21
28.00
22.00
+ 69.11
1. 62
- 19.20
6.00
+
46.68
+
56.47
+
43.85
+
26.10
+
42.29
�Example 116
Example 117
29,440
12,960
7,360
Co.
City 10,300
Co.
City
3,240
4,540
323.8 6
435. 86
175.96
1 66 .78
78 .56
39 .56
35. 00
22.00
+112.00
9. 18
39 . 00
1 3. 00
86. 96
158. 84
68. 44
64 . 87
82 . 94
41. 78
28 . 00
22 .00
3. 57
- 41.16
6 .00
79.3 6
75.22
93. 16
46 . 96
35.00
22. 00
4. 14
- 46 . 20
- 13.00
70 .15
66 . 4 9
85.86
43. 26
35.00
22 .00
3 . 66
- 42 . 60
- 13. 00
87. 99
83. 40
65. 42
32 .90
28 . 00
22 .00
4 . 59
- 32 . 52
6 . 00
85.11
80 . 67
112 . 14
56 .58
28 . 00
22. 00
4 . 44
- 55 .56
87 . 99
83 . 40
69 . 07
34 . 75
4 .59
- 34 .32
+ 71. 88
Example 118
28,160
Co.
City
7,040
9,860
305 .46
414.58
+109.12
Example 119
33,920
Co.
8,480
City 11,870
Example 1110
23,800
Co.
City
5,950
8,3 20
21,360
Co.
City
5,340
7,480
43,000
Co. 10 ,750
City 15 ,040
-
207. 71
300.17
+ 92. 46
Example 1112
-
242.7 9
340. 78
+ 97.99
Example fi ll
-
388 . 26
511.30
+123.04
.i:--
-
-
518.79
663 . 82
+145.03
-
-
6. 00
+
50 . 82
+
21 . 15
+
45 . 78
+
63 . 78
+
54 . 88
+
26.46
28 .00
22 . 00
-
6 .00
+ 100.12
�L
REPRESENTATION IN LOCAL GOVERNMENT
Q. - What representation would I have in local government?
Other than
being able to vote in elections involving city offices and city
issues, how would my voice in local matters be increased?
A. - You would have more representation in your local government, and
you would have a greater voice in matters affecting your communit y
because you would be closer to your representatives.
The legislative act which provides for the referendum in Sandy
Springs spells out specifically that the area would join the city
as the new Ninth Ward. The new ward would be represented by two
members of the Board of Aldermen and one member of the Board of
Education, all elected. The act further provides that only the
voters in the new ward could vote in the first election for these
three offices. The first election of Ninth Ward officials would
be held in conjunction with the general election in November, and
the officials would take office the first of 1967.
The Sandy Springs area presently is governed b y , and participates
in the election of, a three-man county commission.
County commissioners must be responsive to the citizens of all areas of the
county, and rightly so, since they represent all the county.
The
five members of the Fulton County Board of Education, each representing a school district, are appointed by the Grand Jury for
five-year terms. The county school superintendent is elected by
county-wide vote.
By having two aldermen, both r e siding in the ir ward , Sa n dy Springs
citize ns would have a stronger voice in matt ers o f local government
and, in effect, would be closer to their elected representatives.
In future elections t h ey would vote in the election of Atlan ta' s
mayor, the president of the Board of Aldermen, all member s o f the
Board of Aldermen and Board of Education, and two members of the
City Executive Committee from th e i r own ward. The Sandy Springs
ward also would b e represented on other board s, such as the Atlanta
Public Library Board o f Trustee s. Additionally, the area's repr esentation would be enhanced by the appointment o f its aldermen to
various aldermanic committees which would deal with matt ers pertaining specifically to the Sandy Sp ring s area as well as thos e
affecting the city as a whole.
It should be ke pt in mind tha t the Sandy Sp rings area, with a
population of only abou t 2 0 , 000, has far fewer citizens than any
one of the city's other eight wards. The present eight wards are
made up of more than 500,000 citiz e ns , f o r an avera ge of almost
65,000 per ward. Therefore, representation of the Ninth Ward from
the beginning woul d be proportionately much greater than the current ratio in the other wards. It is logical to expect, then that
some f orm of ward rea lignment is a possib ility in the future.' No
such p l an is presently pending, however, and the new ward would
seem a ssured of its proposed representation for several years.
- 5 -
�Future elections of Ninth Ward aldermen and school board members,
beginning with the next city election in 1969, would be by citywide vote, as is the present procedure for the eight wards. But
candidates would still be required to reside in the wards they
represent.
- 6 -
�GROWTH AND ZONING
Q. - What would happen in the field of zoning and future development of
the Sandy Springs area?
A. - 1.
You could expect the Sandy Springs area to continue to develop
as primarily a low density single-family community. Future
apartment and commercial development could be expected to take
place along portions of the major thoroughfares with emphasis
on strong neighborhood commercial centers at appropriate
intervals as opposed to continuous strip commercial development.
Property would be reclassified into the City of Atlanta zoning
district which most closely resembles the classification which
it is presently zoned under in the Fulton County Zoning
Ordinance.
Zoning designations as established and use permits as approved
by Fulton County prior to January 1, 1967 will be honored by
the City of Atlanta, and will remain in effect.
2.
Public hearings for consideration of proposed zoning changes
in the Sandy Springs area would be held only four times a
year, following the area system as is now presently being used
in Atlanta. These hearings are held only by the Zoning Committee after receiving recommendations by the staff of the
Planning Department and the Atlanta-Fulton County Joint Planning Board. The decision of the Zoning Committee receives
final action by the full Board of Aldermen and Ma yor.
3.
The Atlanta Zoning Ordinance contains district classifications
which closely relate to those in the Fulton County Ordinance,
although similar classifications in Atlanta generally contain
more restrictive requirements.
In addition to these similar
districts the Atlanta Ordinance contains several new classifications which permit only a highly selective number of uses
with regulations which permit and encourage high development
standards. These classifications provide for a reasonable
use of certain properties while permitting onl y the best
development for the communit y.
A brief description of these new districts follows:
The "R-9 Single-Family Dwelling Group District"
provides for the construction of townhouse units
for individual unit sale under condominium ownership. Units may not be rented under this district.
The district p r ovides for a maximum of twelve
dwelling units per aGre and a maximum ground
coverage of thirty-five percent including. buildings ,
parking and drives.
Several fine townhouse develop ments are presently under construction in Atlanta
under the provisions of this district .
- 7 -
�The "A-L Apartment-Limited Dwelling District"
provides for low-density, high-standard apartment
developments generally compatible with substantial
single-family residential areas. The district
permits garden apartments (two story units) at a
maximum of twelve dwelling units per acre and
permits only thirty-five percent ground coverage
including buildings, parking and drives.
The "C-L Commercial Limited District" permits
primarily office and institutional uses and a few
selected retail studios and shops.
Signs must be
attached to the wall of the building and be only
twenty square feet in size. This district provides
often for a reasonable use of portions of the major
thoroughfare while discouraging all the inherent
ill effects of continuous strip commercial retail
zoning.
It has been found to be generally compatible with certain residential uses as well.
4.
Work would begin immediately to include the Sandy Springs area
into the comprehensive planning process now underway in the
City of Atlanta. This comprehensive planning process is made
up of four elements as follows:
1.
Projected future land use needs and their
location as a guide to future rezoning
evaluations.
2.
Designation of Major Thoroughfares and
their future effect on the adjacent use
of land .
3.
Plans for needed community facilities such
as parks, schools and libraries along with
genera l locations .
4.
The programming of improvements and source
of funds necessary to implement these
future plans.
-
8 -
�FIRE PROTECTION AND FIRE INSURANCE
Q. - How would my fire protection be affected?
What would this mean in
regard to what I pay for my fire insurance?
A. - Your fire insurance rates would be reduced -- substantially , in
many cases. But, more important, better fire protection would be
afforded to your home or business.
Fire protection and fire insurance rates go hand in hand. The
better the protection available to you, the less you must pay for
fire insurance. Ratings are assigned to particular areas on the
basis of fire protection facilities and other factors.
Fire insurance rates , in turn, are determined b y a formula based on the
rating.
The City of Atlanta has a Class 3 rating, which compares ve ry
favorably w~th other cities of similar size across the nation.
Atlanta has kept well within the requirements o f its Class 3 rating
by building, equipping and maintaining fire stations at k e y points
throughout the city, and by assuring an ample water supply in ev e r y
area. Fire protection, in short, is ex cellent and f ire insu r ance
rates are as low as rates in all but a few major cities .
Sandy Springs, on the other hand, has t wo different rat i n g s : Class
6 for the Sandy Springs Fir e District (which comprises r oughly t h e
area south of Dalrymple Road) and Class 10 f or the ar e a o u ts i de th e
fir e district. Fire insurance rates for Cla ss 6 are signif i c antly
higher than Cla ss 3 , and the rates for Class 10 ar e eno rmo u s ly
higher -- particularly in the c a s ~ of a f rame dwelling, for whi c h
the rates are as much as five and a h a lf time s gr e a ter than Cl a s s 3.
Protection for the Sandy Spring s Fire District is f u r n i shed by one
fire station in t h e area, manned b y one compa ny, a nd by another
company of firemen operating from a City of Atlanta f ir e statio n on
Northside Drive .
(The additional compa ny wor kin g fr om t he Atlanta
station is support e d by the Sandy Sp.r i ng s Fir e Di s tr i ct.
When this
prot e ction was a dded , the district ' s ra t i n g improve d from Class 7
to Class 6 . ) Emergency "back-up" a ss i st anc e is availab le from th e
Northside Dr ive station and another stat ion in Buc khead.
The protection is f u r nished b y the Cit y of Atlant a un der a c ont ract
arrang ement , and residents o f the distr ic t pay a 4.5 - mil l tax for
the serv ic e.
Atlanta ' s Class 3 r ating depen d s on a h i gh degree o f protection
thr ou g hout t he ci ty. Thu s , i f Sa n dy Springs joined the city, it
would b e come t he c i t y' s r esp on s ib ili t y to all its citizens to bring
the n ew area up t o Cl as s 3 s t a nda rds as quickly as possible . The
ci t y cou l d n o t ri s k t he l o s s of i ts Class 3 rating, and it would
not a llow any ar e a to g o with o u t ad e quate protection.
Once Sandy Sprin gs voi c ed it s desire to become a part of Atlanta ,
th e city would immedia tely reque s t the Southeastern Underwriters
- 9 -
�to undertake a survey of the new area to determine what needs must
be met to satisfy Class 3 requirements. The recommendations from
the survey would have to be met for Atlanta to maintain its rating.
Although the recommendations from the survey would be the final
guide, the city has made a preliminary study of the area.
It is
anticipated that three new fire stations would be required. One
of these would replace the existing station, which is considered
substandard and poorly located to cover such a large area. The
anticipated equipment needs include replacement of two e x isting
engines and acquiring one new engine and a ladder truck.
(Present
equipment would be ineffective in fighting a fire in a building
taller than two stories.) Personnel needs have been estimated at
35 additional men, seven of whom would form a battalion chief's
unit.
At l anta's present situation -- facilities, equipment and manpower
which comfortably meet minimum standards -- would give the city a
head start toward bringing the new area up to Class 3 standards in
a minimum time.
By submitting a reasonable, workable timetable
fo r meet ing standards within an agreed period, the city could help
effec t a lowering of insurance rates within a year.
An ex a mp l e of the city's efforts in this respect can be taken from
the 195 2 Plan of Improvement, by which a large new area entered
the c ity.
Some areas were brought up to Class 3 within a few
months and the entire area within 18 months.
- 10 -
�POLICE PROTECTION
Q. - What changes would occur in police protection?
Would the city
build a new precinct station in Sandy Springs?
A. - Police protection would be greatly expanded and improved -- and
the basic concept would change from the type of service provided
in rural areas to the "full-service" protection afforded in a
heavily populated urban area. No additional stations are contemplated in any area of the city, at present.
Sandy Springs presently receives its police service from the City
of Atlanta under a contract arrangement with Fulton County.
The
service includes four patrol cars in the area around the clock,
but the service is limited by the number of officers assigned.
The only laws enforceable are state laws, which are designed, for
the most part, for rural areas. Anyone arrested as a violator of
a state law must be turned over to the Fulton County sheriff for
trial in a state court.
If the area chooses to join the city, it would be necessary to
increase immediately the radio patrol service now provided; foot
patrolmen would be added for duty in the business district, and a
number of motorcycle patrolmen would be put on traffic and patrol
duty.
(The number of additional men required is under study by
the Atlanta Police Department.) In addition, the citizens of the
Sandy Springs area would receive the benefit of all the services
and facilities of the Juvenile Crime Prevention Squad and the
special squads in the Detective Department, which are not now
available to the area.
Policemen would enforce city ordinances ,
as well as state laws, the same as they are enforced in the rest
of Atlanta at present.
The City of Atlanta presently has appro x imately 1 . 5 policemen for
every 1,000 population. The city is striving not only to maintain
that ratio but to improve it for the increased protection of all
its citizens.
As for the addition of a precinct station, the trend is a wa y from
the precinct concept in these days of two-way radio communications
and other modern facilities.
A radio patrol car , manned by two
officers or even just one, is literally a "traveling precinct
station." With radio communications, the patrolman can call for
assistance and have other officers at his sid e within moments .
There are no plans for any precinct stations, and the emphasis
will continue to be on mobility and close communications b y r adio .
- 11 -
�SANITATION SERVICE
Q. - How would my garbage pickup and other sanitation services be affected if Sandy Springs joins the city?
have to pay more for this service?
As a homeowner, would I
A. - Your sanitation services would be expanded and improved and it
would cost you less.
As a resident of Atlanta, you would begin receiving several services
which are not now available to you -- rubbish pickup, street cleaning, dead animal removal, sanitary inspection, and "guttering",
which means periodic removal of grass and other obstructions from
street gutters.
It is the city's responsibility to bring all these
services to its citizens, as well as providing two garbage collections each week.
Instead of paying more for these additional
services, your sanitation charge would be reduced to a maximum of
$22.00 a year.
This is based on a base charge of $6.0b plus $4.00
for each 25 feet of lot frontage or fraction thereof, but not to
e x ceed the $22.00 a year maximum for residences.
This would mean a savings of either $6.00 or $13.00 a year for you,
depending on where you live. Two different types of garbage collection service are now provided to the people of Sandy Springs under
an arrangement between the City of Atlanta and Fulton County.
"Indistrict" service is provided to those within the sanitary district,
which includes all of Sandy Springs south of a line extending 300
feet beyond Abernathy Road. Residents within the district receive
two garbage collections per week, for which the homeowners pay $28. 00
per year per premises .
The rest of the Sandy Springs area receives
"out-of-district" service, which includes two garbage collections
per week on an optional basis. Those homeowners who desire the
service pay $35.00 per year for it, and no charge is made of those
who do not want the service.
Business establishments throu ghout the Sandy Springs area now p ay
for garbage collection on the basis of the actual cost of rendering
the service. Most businesses would realize a substantial saving b y
being a part of the city -- and would receive improved service as
well.
A survey of city sanitary services is being conducted presently by
the Public Administration Service .
These findings, which will be available soon, will result in improved services. Any change in rate schedules will apply both to
city residents and to county residents now receiving city services
under contract with the county government.
- 12 -
�WATER SERVICE
Q. - What difference, if any, would there be in the way water is supplied to my home or business?
Would my water bill be affected?
A. - The only difference would be on your water bill, which would be
cut in half.


Virtually all the existing homes and businesses in the Sandy
Springs area already receive their water from the City of Atlanta
Water Department under an arrangement between the city and Fulton
County. Users outside the city, however, are billed for water at
a double rate. The minimum monthly water bill for City of Atlanta
users is $1.57; for those outside the city, the minimum is $3.14.
Thus, the annual savings for water users inside the city is at
least $18.84.
In reality, savings run much higher than the minimum, however.
Atlanta _people are accustomed to having a plentiful supply of good
water at low rates, and they use it in quantity. Ex perience has
shown that very few homes, inside or outside the city , use little
enough water to be billed for the minimum. An actual survey of
55 homes in .the Sandy Springs area chosen at random, showed that
the average water charge paid during 1965 was $90.10. Only five
of these homes were within a dollar of the minimum bill , and three
of the larger users paid $203.39, $240.62 and $366.39.
If these same homes had been inside the city, their water bills for
1965 would have averaged $45 . 57. The average sav ings would h ave
been $44.53 per home.
A similar survey of businesses, also chosen at random to include
small operations as well as large, revealed an av erage wat e r b ill
of $130.26 per year. The average savings inside the city would
have been $62.83.
- 13 -
�SCHOOLS
Q. - What changes would occur in the schools my children attend?
Wha t would
be done about school bus transport a tion, since the Atlanta system does
not have free transportation?
A. - Several maj or differences would occur in the way of advantages: The
addition of kindergartens in the schools of the Sandy Springs ar ea; a
greater emphasis at the high school lev el on vocational programs, in
addition to the college preparatory and general programs; and the
benefit of more specialized programs and more technical specialists.
School bus transportation, admitt e dly, is a problem which would have
to be dealt with - and right away.
In general, the curricula of the Atlanta system and the Fulton County
system are similar, as are the personnel policies , overall operational
procedures and financial structures.
Addition of kindergartens to the Sa ndy Springs schools would -b e an
ex p e ns ive undertaking f o r the ci ty, p a rticularly wher e e x isting fa cilities are operating almost at capacity.
In those elementary schools
where space is immediately available, kindergartens would be started
in January, 1967, and teachers provided.
In elementary schools where
cla ssr oom space is not readily availa ble, air-conditioned supplemental
cla s s rooms would be r e a dy for use , with necessary teache rs, b y t h e
opening o f school in Sept ember, 196 7. Prima r y stud i es show th a t 1 0
additional teache rs and some $243,000 to $293,000 in additional funds
would be required to provide programs for the estimated 4 50 kindergarten pupils in the a r ea.
The salary s chedul e s f or teachers are s omewhat higher in th e Atla nt a
s ys t em , which al s o would me a n ad diti on a l exp e nditure s.
In gen eral ,
Atlant a t e a c her s ma ke 8 . 9 perce n t mor e t h a n Fulton Count y t eache rs .
I n b e comin g a part o f the At l a n t a Sc hoo l Sys t e m, t eache rs i n t h e Sa ndy
Springs s c hoo ls wou ld t r ansfer directly to the city 's pension plan
without loss of a n y money or benef its. Atlant a an d Fulton school
offi cial s both say t hat p e n sion b e n efits of both s y stems a re p r a c tically the same .
The Fulton County s y s t em provide s fr ee b u s t r a ns port a ti on f or pup i ls
who live furt h e r than 1 - 1 / 2 mil es fr om scho ol, a n d t h is exp e ns e i s
cove r ed by lo cal a n d s t a t e f u nds . On t he o ther han d , the Atla nt a
Tr a ns i t Sy stem provides bus tran sportation fo r Atla n t a sys t em pu p il s
on r out es d e t e rmin e d by pupil n eed and with pup i l s payin g as t hey
ri de . Robert Sommer v ille, pr e sid e nt o f the Atla n t a Tr a n sit Sy st em ,
has given assu ranc e t hat s chool bus route s will b e provid e d for p upil s
in the Sandy Sp rin gs area.
Ad dit i on a l construction n eed s a re e vid ent in the Sandy Sp r i n g s ar e a .
Enr o l lment ha s increa s ed s ome 56 percen t sin ce 1 960, and it co n t i n u e s
to inc rease.
Estimates are tha t the e n r ollment in k inde r g ar t ens
through the twel fth grade wil l ex ceed 1 0,000 pupils b y 1970.
Q. - Wha t would happ en to s choo l pupils l i ving in the a r e a south of Roswe ll
a nd nort h o f the Sa ndy Spr ing s ar ea , not affe ct e d by t h e r efer e nd um?
A. - Both city and county s chool offic i als have g i v en a ssurance that these
pup i ls would be al l owed to rema in i n the i r p resen t sc hoo l s i f t h ey
c h oos e.
- 14 -
�SEWERS
Q. - Would there be any major chang es in the system of sewer service?
Would I be assessed any sewer charges before sewer service is
ex tended to my home?
A. - If your home is already on a sewer line , or if you have a working
septic tank, you probably would see no immediate changes that
would affect you. Certainly, there would be no sewer assessment
charged until sewer service is provided .
The city already has made a preliminary study of the probabl e
needs of the area, and it would undertake to make the necessary
improvements and additions as soon as possible. However , y our
present situation would largely govern the effect on y ou and your
home .
For example, if your home already is served b y a sewer line , you
would see nothing different. You would continue receiv ing the
service with no special charges or other chang es, ex cept where
such might be applied city-wide.
If your home is serv ed b y a
working septic tank in g ood condition, then y ou would not be
affected until a sewer line is ex tended to your street. Ev en
when this occurred, you could be granted as long as six y e a rs to
pay the assessment which is alway s made for this se rv ice .
If sewer service were brought to your neighborhood for th e f irst
time -- this is always by petition of the r e sidents -- then y our
property would be assessed on a front-footage basis for the sewe r
line in front of y our property. This assessment is set b y l aw at
$ 3.50 per f ront foot.
The connection to y our home fr om t he sewer
line, if the line were laid on a str e et t h at is a lready p aved,
would be between $80 and $1 2 0. And a gain , if y ou a l ready h ave a
satisfactory septic tank , you could be allowed up to six yea r s to
pay t h e assessment.
This policy e x ists in the case of a lready ex ist ing r es idences a n d
does not a pply to va c ant p r op e rt y, howeve r .
The p r elimina r y study b y the c i t y has i ndi cated several immed i ate
needs in t h e ar ea , s ome of wh ich wou ld be p riori t y requirements.
One o f these n e eds i s f o r an out f all s ewer in t he a r ea of Heard's
Ferry Ro a d, wh i c h wo ul d connect to t he Mar s h Creek Wa t e r Pollution
Cont r ol Pla nt . Anoth er d ef in i te need i s for e x pan sion of some
segments o f th e Nan cy Creek t r unk sewer, whi ch would b e a joint
projec t with DeKalb Count y.
Severa l o the r n eeds are a ntic ipa t ed in the near future, but, in
g enera l , mo s t of the Sandy Sp rin gs area is reasonab l y well sewered
ex c e p t in s ome areas where the t o pography of the land will always
be a p rob l em i n p r oviding an extensive system of sewer service.
- 15 -
�STREET LIGHTS AND TRAFFIC SIGNALS
Q. - Would the city provide street lights in my neighborhood right away?
What would be done to improve our traffic signals?
A. - As a general policy, the City of Atlanta provides street lights in
areas as requested by the residents, and it has kept up with demands
since the 1952 Plan of Improvement. As for traffic signals, first
attention would be given to upgrading the ex isting signals at several intersections and to satisfying the known needs for new
installations at key intersections.
No wholesale program of street light installation is anticipated
in any part of the city, because of budget limitations. In other
words , a neighborhood . that has not expressed a positive desire for
t h is service need not fear that street lights would be forced on
them . However , the city, through its Traffic Engineering Department , has been attentive to the requests of those who do want
lights and ·is currently right on schedule in meeting these demands.
Additionally , a program of upgrading street lights on major
t horoughfares is in progress to bring these facilities up to the
lat es t recommended standards.
A prel iminary survey in the Sandy Springs area has shown that some
20 2 street lig hts a re currently in use, 90 on arterial streets and
11 2 on local stree ts. The estimated needs for arterial streets
includ e a n a d ditional 1,341 lights, which, obviously , could not be
ins t a l led al l a t once.
The estimated needs for local streets are
for some 2, 7 00 add i tional lights, which would be undertaken by the
city on the basis of r equests by the residents.
In genera l , t he cit y inst a lls traffic signals at intersections
where traff ic co n d i ti on s satisfy the " warrants" set out by uniform
national sta ndard s, a s a dopted and prescribed by the Georgia Highway
Department. Howev er, Atla nta citizens on occasion have shown a
de s ire f o r and have p rov ided the necessary funds to have signals
ins talled a t s ome i nt er sections where the "warrants" are not fully
met. This can be acc omp l is hed at ·i ntersections where signals are
a help t o traffic movement a n d a convenience to the citizens .
Eight traffic s ignals a re now in ser v i ce in the Sandy Spring s area ,
and an e s timate d f i ve or s i x new signals would be needed in the
next two to three y e ars , a c co rd ing to the city survey. These would
be undertaken according to p rio r i ty n eed .
16
�r-------
1
STREETS AND SIDEWALKS
Q. - What could Sandy Springs expect in the way of street and sidewalk
improvements, now and in the future? How can we get sidewalks or
streets paved, and how much would it cost?
A. - A survey by the City of Atlanta Department of Construction found
three streets in the Sandy Springs area in "below average" condition, ten streets still unpaved, while the remainder of your
streets are in "good" or "average" condition.
The "below average" streets -- Davis Drive, Morgan Falls Drive
and Northside Drive -- wi ll require resurfacing in the very near
future, probably during 1967, the Construction Department said.
The city has pledged to assign a high priority to these projects
and already has projected an estimated cost of $45,000.
Paving of streets and sidewalks in the City of Atlanta, with two
exceptions, requires a petition signed by more than 50 percent of
the property owners involved.
Property owners are assessed for
the cost of the paving on a front-footage basis. The average
assessment for sidewalks in residential areas (six-foot sidewalks)
is about $2.60 per front foot, and property owners are allowed up
to four years to pay. Charges for street paving vary with the
size of the project, but the assessment generally is between $6.50
and $7.50 per front foot for paving and curbing.
Property owners
are allowed up to 10 years to pay the assessments for street
paving and up to four years to pay for curbing.
The t wo exceptions to the petition method are for sidewalks which
are deemed necessary in rare instances for reasons of safety , and
for sidewalks in front of schools.
If a sidewalk is required for
public safety, the city may put one in without being petitioned
and then assess property owners on a front-foota g e basis.
Sidewalks in front of schools are built at city e x pense , with no
petition required. Two schools in Sandy Springs are presently
without sidewalks -- Morgan Falls School and Brandon Mill School
(under construction).
In line with the city's policy on school
sidewalks, these two projects would be undertaken at the e a rliest
possible date.
- 17 -
�C
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PROPOSED SANDY SPRINGS ANNEXATION
�SANDY SPRINGS
INCORPORATE, BE ANNEXED,
OR STAY AS WE ARE?
JUNE 1965
THE SANDY SPRINGS COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION
Executive Committee:
William Waronkar, President
·Edward H. Wasson, Jr., Vice President
Edgar Orr, Treasurer
mrs. w. W. ford, Jr., Secretary
E. E. "Tom" Fuller
Mrs. John Galambos
Ben Cbris Harris
Mrs. Robert Hosse
Max Shatzen
(President, 1964 - Frank Love, Jr.)
�W ILLIAM B. HARTSFIELD
ATTORNEY AT LAW
STANDARD FEDER.'\ L SAVINGS BLDG.
ATLANTA, GA.
MAYOR EMERITUS
CITY OF ATLANTA
Mr. R. Earl Landers
Administrative Assistant
City of Atlanta
Atlanta, Georgia 30303
Dear Earl:
I have yours of the 14th. with reference to annexation .
The Act passed in 1966 would, in my opinion, enable Atlanta to annex
contiguous land in DeKalb County. In the areas of North Atlanta and
Druid Hills, there are many people who would come into Atlanta if given
the opportunity, however, DeKalb County would probably not like to lose
water customers , and I think it would take some skillful ne gotiations
on t he part of t he City.
However, s ince the stakes involve control of some $700,000 , 000 . 00 wor t h
of city f acilities , p lus the good name of the South's greatest city, I
think such high stake s would warrant an intensive campaign to bri ng
thes e people in - however arduous i t might be .
The Bill st at es that it is cumul at i ve, which means that you could still
re l y on t he old Plan of Improvement Act of 1951 when annexing Fulton
County. It is much s imp l er except you must annex by contiguous land
l ots.
Another vague section of t he 1966 Bi ll requires that the area be cont i guous with the pr e sent city limits f or at least 1/ 8 of the areas' aggre gat e externa l boundary. I pr esume this could easily be met in the case
of Drui d Hi ll s and North Atlanta , a lthough t o me i t is r a ther vague, and,
of course, bright- eyed lawyers on t he other s ide would subj ect .e very st ep
of such procedure to microscop ic inspection.
Why could not the c ity det a il several peopl e , without fanfare or publicity,
to t hese t wo areas and a l so to t he l and l ot adjacent to Atlanta in the
Sandy Springs area for t he purpose of securing s i gna t ures.
Of course, it i s up to you to decide whether you want to us e the 1951 law
in Sandy Springs and the 1966 law in DeKalb, or whether you wish to use
the 1966 law in both counties .
The future stakes are high and well worth the effort. If you will listen
to me, however, any advance publicity will simply result in the officials
�\VILLIAM B. HARTSFIELD
ATTORNEY AT LAW
STANDARD FEDERAL SAVINGS BLDG.
ATLANTA, GA.
MAYOR: EMERITUS
CITY OF ATLANTA
involved raising a public hullaballoo to prevent citizens from signing
and you will then get nowhere. If it is done quietly by explaining the
facts to each citizen and getting his signature, I think you would have
a reasonable chance of success .
Yours truly,
wbh/ctb
/
P. s. In the case of the land lot adjacent to Sandy Springs, they already
voted for annexation, and most of the parents want to send their children
to Dyke s School.
�WILLIAM B. HARTSFIELD
ATTORNEY AT LAW
STANDARD FEDERAL SAVINGS BLDG.
AUANTA, GA.
April 20, 1967
MAYOR EMERITUS
CITY OF ATLANTA
Mr . Earl Landers
City Hall
Atlanta, Georgia
Dear Earl:
As you know, there is an area immediately a djacent to the Atlanta city limits
in the Sandy Springs area, which has always voted for annexation to Atlanta.
One of the Plan of Improvement Acts prov ided that if a land lot had sufficient
people and sufficient taxable values, that i t could be annexed by a petition t o
t he Superior Court.
The County Attorney (who,incidentally, has alway s been a bitter opponent of
the Plan of Improvement) has indicated that possib ly this act was rendered invalid
by a Home Rule Act later passed by the Legislature .
I notice that the Supereme Court of Georgia in the case of Lee versus the
City of Jesup, has hel d that the Home Rule Act of 1965 does not provide the sole
method for annexation , but that the General As sembly still has power to do so by
special act. This would indicate that the method set forth in the Plan of
Improvement Act of 1951 would still be val id.
If the City would be willing to encourage the people in this land lot, I
believe they would get up such a petition. If it were successful and if the
Court upheld it, this would mean that you could annex selective contiguous areas
of desirable citizens by direct court action instead of being browbeaten and
treated as we were when the last annexation referendum was authorized by the
legislative delegation.
It would also start a trend, which in
Sandy Springs to come in.
my
opinion, would induce the balance of
The Legal Department might also look into the question as to whether or not
this method would be valid in the case of land in another county. North Atlanta
is contiguous to At lanta. I live a few hundred feet from it, and many of my
neighbors would like to come into the City.
Yours sincerely,
1~~frAM
17~4
B. HARTsdELD
WBH/bjc
�May l , 1967
Honorable William B . Hartsfield
Mayor Emeritus - City of Atl nta
Standard Federal Savings Building
Atlanta, Georgia 30303
Dear Mayor H :rtsfield :
Ref rence is made to your letter of .April 20th pertaining to
m thod of annexation nd the possibility of the City ann xing
the area adjacent to the Atlanta City Limits in the· S ndy Springs
re whkh has lways voted for anne tion.
I am enclo ing be:r · with for your information a copy of Senate
Bill #182, "Municip litie - Ann x tion by Petition, Procedur ,.
Etc." adopted in 1966 together with n ordinance by th M yor
and Bo rd of Ald rmen approved Sept mber 20, 1966 . It would
appear to me that wh r th re idents of eith r the Sandy Springs
r
or the No,:th Atl nta rea re conti.gu.ou to the City Limits
of Atlanta and th re ident of uch ar a de ire to be annexed
th t this would be th mo t expedient mean bf a.nn x tion.
I would
ppr ciate rec iving your opinion on thi .
Sincerely your ,
R. Earl L nd rs
Admini trative A
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C1
OF ATLANTA
OFFICE of the MAYOR
Atlanta, Georgia
30303
I VAN ALLEN, JR
MAYOR
February 21, 1966
R. EARL LANDERS
ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT
MRS . ANN M. MOSES
EXECUT I VE SECRETARY
President and Members of the
Atlanta Board of Aldermen, and
Department Heads of the
City of Atlanta
Survey Report of the Public Administration Service
Gentlemen:
In his Annual Message to the B oard of Aldermen on January 6, 1947, Mayor
Emeritus William B . Hartsfield outlined many changes needed to improve the
functioning of Atlanta I s city government.. That was nineteen years ago ._ and
while Atlanta has grown and prospered far beyond our greatest dreams ,. its
city government has experienced little basic change. In fact, the basic
concept of its governmental structure has undergone far less alteration
than many would imagine since the present City Charter was adopte d in 1874.
With the assistance of federal funds to help finance a comprehensive study
of our total governmental operation, we embarked on such a course in 1963.
The Survey Report by the Public Administration Service, contracted for in
May, 1965, and enclosed herewith, i's the first of several studies covering
our past, present and future needs. Also enclosed is the Community Improvement Program Staff Report.
This Rep~;rt details our deficiencies and prescribes changes to correct these.
I concur with these findings in principle and substance. A COPf of this Repof't
is being forwarded to each member of the Board of Aldermen and to each
Department Head. I am asking that each person give studied consideration to
the comp._ete Report and to the effect that its implementation would have on his
particular area of operations.
�• P a ge Two •
While the deficiencies cited therein did not <:ome about over night, but are in
fact a ninety-two year accurnulati~, I believe that time is running out and
that we must move expeditiously to implement many of these recommendations.
I prop:,se that a Governmental Study Commission be created to develop a timetable of action, and I seek your thoughts on the composition of this Commission,
which should consist of adequate representation from the Board of Aldermen and
from the citizens of Atlanta.
I will greatly appreciate your response,
erely yours ,
Ivan Allen, Jr;
Mayor
IAJ i- :lp
Enclosure
�CITY OF ATLANTA
COMMUNITY IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM
CITY HALL •
68 MITCH ELL STREET, S. W. •
ATLANTA , GEORG IA 30303 •
IVAN ALL EN. JR
Mayo r, C,t1 0 1 Atianta
522 -4463
GEOR
·L
Oa· • ,
PLA NNING AND DEVEL OPMENT COMMI TTEE
BOARD OF ALDERMEN
RODNEY M
Cha,rman
COOK.
E GREGORY GRIGGS.
Vice Cha,rman
ROBER T S. DENNIS
E A. GILLIAM
CHARL ES H LEFTWICH
J BEN MOOR E
JACK SUMMERS
COMMUNITY IMPROVEMENT PROGRAlv\
STAFF REPORT
TECHNIC AL ADVISORY BOARD
EXECUTIVE COMM/ TT [£
R EARL LANDERS
Adrr.-n Asst to the '11ayor, Ctiauman
WYONT B BEAN
P 11nnmg f,-.g nee.·
Subject:
Government of the City of Atlanta, Georgia
(A Survey Report 1965) by Public Administration
Service, Chicago, tllinois
Dafe:
FebnsQry 21, t966
HENRY L BOWDEN
C- t1 Attcrney
CHARLES L DAVIS
Comprrolfer
WILLIAM S HOWLAND
Exe ut,.,e O·re, (!.,r. CA CUR
RAY A NIXON
Chef c,/ C nr;tru-:t
n
M B. SATTERFIELD
Exe::. Dr
At,anta Housing A 1!t')..Jr.ry
1
WILLIAM R WOFFORD
Background
J,,,':.pe, tvr Jf Building
OTHER MEMBERS
DUANE W BECK
E"ec O,r Cc;rnmun,tv
In August 1964, the Mayor and Board of Aldermen adopted
C,
unc f
I At'JntJ
GLENN E BENNETT
£ ,ecu 1 ,1e D rf' t r A R M P C
KARL A BEVINS
Tr 1fl-
and approved the submission of an application to the Urban Renewal
Engmeer
JACK C DELIUS
Par"s Gen~r:Jf Man:,p,er
DR J F HACKNEY
O,r Pub NPiJ th. F ultun [('>
Administration of the Department of Housing and Urban Development
C H HILDEBRAND
f,re Ct::ef
PAUl 8 IVEY
Land Agent
JOHN H JACOBS
D ,,., ti r ,,f L•br.11 P•
for grant funds under Title
HERBERT T JENKINS
P
e Ct.,el
to assist in financing the preparation of the Community Improvement
I of the Housing Act of 1949, as amended,
ALAN F KIEPPER
Fu/ n
,!.Jr iy ', 11nJger
DR JOHN W LEf<;Ot,
Supf
,I :>(h
Program. A contract between the federal govetnment and the City
c:;
PAUi W MILLER
r;, t ,,,.,, in 4 F C JP B
EMORY C PARRISH
Ass·r $t<1te H.•r1 P ann
,,g [ng neer
fHOMAS H ROBERTS
of Atlanta for the grant funds was approved and executed
by the
P1c1nnmg Dir , A R M P
DR T O VIN<;ON
D 1r Pub HeJfth Dt~Ka 1b C 1
PAULL WEIR
Water Works Gen Mgr
Mayor and Board of Aldermen in December 1964. Several studies
are required by virtue of the application and subsequent contract.
The enclosed study on governmental administration is one of these
required studies.
ATLANTA'S MUNICIPAL RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM
L ALOR ~CE
>
�Community Improvement Program
Staff Report
Page 2
Commensurate with the approval of the above appl ic:ation, the Mayor
and Board of Aldermen of the City of Atlanta adopted II A Pol ic:y Statement
on Community Development" which was to serve as an obiective framework
for the preparation and development of Atlanta's Community Improvement
Program. Section IV of this policy statement enumerated several objectives
pertaining to governmental and related activities, namely:
1. 11 To more clearly define the functions and obiectives of the
various agencies and governments involved in the urban development process; and, to determine the most effective forms of
organization needed to attain these objectives."
2. "To encourage closer cooperation between the agencies and
governments engaged in redevelopment activities in this region,
including the encouragement of patterns of continuous liaison
and the free exchange of information. 11
3. "To seek adoption within the City government of improved administrative procedures yielding greater efficiency."
In May 1965, the Mayor and Board of Aldermen of the City of Atlanta
retained under contract Public Administration Service, a non-profit
corporation of Chicago, Illinois, to undertake a broad-scale inventory and
evaluation of its system of government. Their examination was also to include
recommendations for governmental Improvement. Public Administration Service
�Page 3
. Community Improvement Program
Staff Report
has proven itself well qualified for this undertaking in that it has achieved
international acclaim for its excellence in the field of governmental organization and management studies.
Their report entitled
11
Government of the City of Atlanta, Georgia
(A S1.:i'vey Report 1965)," is now complete. It is
e1
comtn.1ctive report
aimed at the broad 0·1erd I fonctions of C:~y govcrnmen·~o The report includes
a review of m'Jnagf::,nent prn.:tices., cdmirii~,·rathre procedures, personnel
and budge1i!1d pol k.ies, pbnnit~fh e i'c, A proj.a~tcd population to double
our current ;;b.:e by 1985 cmd a co~.1me1"1s11rn~e in.c;·eose in demand for municipal
services provided the atmosphere in whid-. inis report was undertaken.
Action
In the moni·hs immediately ahead the findings, conclusions and recommendations
contained in this report shou ld receive the objec·t ive attention, careful scrutiny
and evaluation of the ci tizc,1s of Ailantl.l and their elected representatives. The
future development of the Clty of Atlanta ond the role its government should ploy
may well be gove rned by the outcome,
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der A a ·'·a 1 s Co
s'i·udy to be co pleted
w··;-h a S'·af
Ir: oveme · P o ram,
o '· e s·"·udy.
.r:· s'·
This ·so e of eig' "repo· s elated to urba
evelop~ ent a
renewal c;c . ·ivi ·;-ies being p epa e
·n connec'-ion w·'·h ·:,e Communi y lmproveme ·'·
P·ograma W eas . is repo · · ·snow comp lete, t e
ema m I seve e o s w · II be forwa ded ·' o you
as ,.1 ey are developed and can be made avai able
duri g he ex'· yea· •
GLA,J / Im
Enclosures
ATL ANTA'S MUNICIPAL RESEA RC!-1 &
'JPtvlENT PROGRAM
l
·:L.;L~ ._.... ~-..::v ~
�SURVEY OF CITY-m-rHED HOUSES
BY CLASSIFICATION OF OCCUPANT
OCCUPANTS BY CLASSIFICA'11ION -
TOTAL IN DEPARTMENT
PARKS
1 Parks Assistant General Manager
2
AIRPORT
2
2 Airport Assi stant Manager
1
l Airport Manager
l
l Airport Field Supervisor
CONSTRUCTION
16
4 Water Pollution Control Operator II
4 Water Pollution Control Operator III
4
62
l Water Pollution Control Operat or I
5
1 Civil Engineer IV
6
i Civil En gineer III
WATER
6 P. P. Engineer I I
ll
2
2 P. P. En gin ee r I I I
2
2 Water Purification Superintendent
2
2 P. p . Foreman
14
.
2
38
6 P. P. Fireman I
2 P. P. Fir eman I I
1 Water Puri fication Operator I
7
4 Water Puri fi cation Operat or II
1
l Wate r Works District .Superintendent
6
l General Maintenan ce Me chani c II
9
1 Water Works f or eman II
1
l Dire ctor Water Purification Plan ts
1
1 Assistant General Manager
1
l
l Assistant Water Works District Superintendent
, -~ Civil Engineer IV
PRISCN
l
1 Prison Superintendent
1
2
l Assistant Prison Superintendent
l Guard Foreman I
3
1 Guard Foreman II
22
1 Farm Guard
1
l .Farm Equipment Mechanic Guard
1
1 Dairy Foreman
TOTAL
ff
.
�MUNICIPAL AIRPORT :
ADDRESS
CONSTRUCTION
STATEMENT
OF VALUES
OCCUPIED BY
8i OOO
w.
T. Jones
5 , 000
E.
1. •
Asst. Mgr.
29
Field Sup.
2
Mgr.
1
91 2 Vir ginia Avenue
A-S
3571
Rainey Avenue
A-S
1555
Car ole Way
F
· 1 0 , 000
1671
Carole Way
F
7 ,500
1472 Gaines Ave .
B
500.00
Land Agent-Field Office
Cl a rk-Howe ll Hwy.
F
500.00
Robert & Co .
$
y'
POSITION
NUHBER
CLASS IFICAT ION
Mcl'lillian
G. H. Ridgeway,Jr.
H. K. Malone, Jr. Asst . Mgr.
I


,_j//~..;.4


,', / I-
Eng:i.-nee rs
44
)
�/
PRISON DEPARTMENT:
STATEMENT
OF VALUES
OCCUPI ED BY
$ 22 ,500
A. E. 'Ehomast on
ADDRESS
CONSTRUCTION
Key Road
B-V
N/S Main Street
F
49000
s.
N/ S Main S tr eet
F
4,ooo
Edwin E. El am
.i?urm Equip. Liecl1anic
6
Guard
Dairy - Foreman
16,000
Emmitt
Dwe lling 100 Yards N/ E
o f Prison Building
.F D-V
20j000
J. IL Har v,ell
Dwelling 500 Years s .
of Fayetteville Rd.
F
B- V
18,000
. GWt/-!./J
1
8
F B-V
Assistant Sup't
. Dwelling - Key Ro ad
Pc1soN' ··
Superintendent
POSITION
NUMBER
J:"orenan II
G. Dutton , Jr.
S/S Fayetteville Road
4,ooo
CLASS IFICATION
T,' ,
.u
El c.m
G. E. Parker
J.
rr.
Hogan
\
13
28
Far m-Guard
23
Assistant
Super i ntendent
32
--,
�CONSTRUCTION DEPARTMENT:
CONSTRUCT°ION
ADDRESS
POSITI ON
NUMBER
STATEMENT
OF VALUE S
OCCUPIED BY
$ 14 ,000
O. K. Holbr ook
W.P .C. Ope r a to r I I
291 '
R. A. Fant
W. P.C. Oper ator III
155
135
CLASSIF I CATION
Camp Creek Disposa l Pl ant :
Cochran Roa d, s .w.
B-V
R.H. Cl ayton Di sposa l Pl ant :
2440 Bol ton .Roa d , N.W .
F
10 , 000
Ent r enchment Creek Disposa l
Pl ant :
E/S Ceme tery Ro a d
F
3 , 500
(Remode ling)
We s t of Pl ant
F
10 ,000
E. C. Vandiver
W, P, C. Opera t or III
1805 Boul de r crest Rd,, S. E.
B-V
14,000
R. H. Morr is s
C.E . I V
Flint River Di sposa l Pl ant :
48 3 Pine Stree t , Hapev i lle
F
10,000
T. E. Swann
W.P .C. Opera t or II
180
F
10,000
J. M. Nobl e s
W. P.C. Oper a to r I
181
CvB
8,000
C.L. Banks ··
w. p. c.
B-V
14,000
L.L. Waller
W. P.C . Ope rator III
126
B-V
9,000
S.D. Love
· W.P . C. Opera tor III
128
B-V
14,000
M.L. Pe tty
20,00 0
Sam Freeman
L/~ j~ 'J Pine St r ee t , Hapev ille
South River Di s po sa l Pl ant :
258 7 Forres t Pa rk Road
253 7 Fo rre st Park Ro ad
23
( .
'
Ope r ator II
121
Ut oy Dispos a l Plant:
4651 Bakers Fe r r y Rd .,
s ..w.
Sandy Cre ek Plant
388 1 Sandy Cree k Road , N.W.
1628 Key Road
(und er construc t ion, t o be oc cupied by- )
W.P . C. Opera t or I I
Civil En gineer III
175
32
�PARKS DEPARTMENT:
ADDRESS
CONSTRUCTION
STATEMENT
OF VALUES
OCCUPIED BY
East Lake Park :
2665 M~mo r i a l Dr ive,S.Eo
F
$ 10 1 000
This property may be over- insured.
Pierc e Whitley
CLASSIFI CAT ION
POSITION
NUMBER
Asst. Gen Mgr.
2
Chastain Park:
Power s Ferry Road, N.W.
F
8,400
Horse Trainer
not city employee.
Th i s dwel ling is on pr oper ty leased to Charties Mounte d Patrol.
f
-
I
�,\'.l' E}i WOW(.S DEPAHTt-fENT :
ADDRESS
CONSTRUCTION
STATEMENT
OF VALUES
OCCUPIED BY
CLASSIFICATION
POSITION
NUMBER
Hemphill Station:
1280 Hemphili Aven ue
1 2 75 Bishop Pla ce
625 Bishop Stre e t
629 Bishop~treet
633 Bishop Str e et
632 Hoke Str~et
· 622 Hok e St~e et
625 Hoke Stre et
621 Hoke S tre et
617 Hoke Street
1365 Res e rvoir Drive
Res e rvoir Drive (./JT GRE'eN}
11~29 Howell Mill Road
61~7 Green Str eet
641 Gre e n Street
653 Gr ee n Street
370 7 Aqua La n e , N. W.
3711 Aqua La ne, N. W.
F
B- V
F
F
F
F
F
F
F
F
F
F
F
F
F
B- V
B- V
B- V
s
99000
10 , 000
6jooo
6 9000
,6 1000
7 9000
~,ooo
6,ooo 6,000
6 , 000
5 9000
6,000
6,000
6 ,ooo ·
6,000
10,000
10,-000 ·
io,ooo
Lind se y G. Va ughn. Pum~. Plant Eng.III
Richar d R .. Smith
Wa t e r Pur. Supt.
J ohn W. Reeve s
Pump. Pl a nt Fo r eman
Ch a rlie C~ Brown
Pump. Pl a nt Fir eman I
W, L. Cochran
Pump. Plant _tn g . II
J ame s E. Co gg ins . P~mp. Pl a nt Fir eman II
J ose ph H. Rud es al Pump. Plan~ Eng. 11 ·
Pa ul Christ ense n
Wa t e r Pur. Op e rator II
E~ L. B&llew
Wa ter Pur. Superinterident
J. Harvey V,1l1ghn
Hater Pur. Operator II
Vacant
Water Pur. Op e rator II
W.R. Shepherd
Pump. Plant Fireman I
I. L. Tolb e rt, Jr. Pump. Plant Fireman I
John E. Black
Water Pur. Operator I
A. W. Clark
Pump. Plarit Eng. II
J. Howa rd Bullaid Wat e r Works Dist. Supt.
Julius M, Allen
Gen. Maint. Me ch. 11
Luke B. Landers
Wat e r Horks Foreman II
76
99
78
309
80
82
1,
562
487
593
! .
I
- 1·
I
L-
. !~· -
i
I
I ·-
83
464
104
.; .
i
I
77
114
455
386
I-
Chattahooche e Pumping Station:
2537 Chatt a hooche e
2529 Chatt a hooche e
2528 Chattahooc he e
2533 Chattahoochee
2545 Chattahoochee
2549 Chattaho9che e
2551 Chatt a hoochee
2553 Chattahoochee
2565 Chattahoochee
253~___Qhattahoochee
2541 Chattahoochee
2532 Chattahooche e
__________r
.7.500 Dupree Drive
7860 Benwell Rd.
Circle ·
Cir cle
Circle
Circle
Circle
Circle
Circle
Circle
Circle
Circle
Circle
Circle
F
B- V
B- V
F
6,000
9,000
9,000
15,000
Charlie B. Greer
B. F • .Ha ges
Edward J. Wooten
B. F. Poss
John D. Barbour
James B. Peyton
G. H. Mccravy
L.A. C~gle
J.C. Stephens
Howard R. Peters
w. - T. Bush
C. F. Hill
J. D. Vaughn
15,000
c.
B-V
7,000
7,500
F
F
F
F
5,500
5,500
B- V
B-V
F
B- V
6,000
7,500
9,000
9,000
7,000
W. Cline
W. Pur. Operator II
l, 91
Pump. Plant Foreman
61
Pump. Pl a nt
.
Engineer
III
58
/
Pump.Plant Eng. II
59
Pump. Plant Fireman I
66
Pump. Plant Fireman II
64
Pump. Plant Fir eman I
68
Pump. Plant Eng. II
60
Pump. Plant Fir eman I
4 70
Dir. Water Pur. Plants
486
A~st. Gen. Manager
98
Pum~. Plant Eng. II
471
Asst. Water Works Dist . . 310
Sup ~rint endent:
468
Ci vil En gin·eer I V -
.
. ·---·······-· - - - ·------------------------·--- -·-·-··-· -----· ····- - --···· ··-- ~--· -
�CITY OF AT LANT A
COMMUNITY IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM
CITY HALL •
68 MITCH ELL STREET, S. W . •
ATLANTA, GEORG IA 30303 •
522 - 44 63
GEORGE L. ALDRIDGE JR
D•rector
/AN ALLEN. JR
·~ayor City of Atlanta
PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT COMMI TTEE
BOARD OF ALDERMEN
RODNEY M COOK,
ChJ•rman
E GREGORY GRIGGS,
Vice.Chairman
ROBERT S DENNIS
E A G1LLIAM
CHARLES H LEFTWICH
J BEN MOORE
JACK SUMMERS
COMMUNITY IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM
STAFF REPORT
TECHNICAL ADVISORY BOARD
EXECUTIVE COMM/ TT[£
R E"RL LANDERS
~rjr
k
..,
· ·r f,
!' P \~3f '
Subject:
Government of the City of Atlanta, Georgia
(A Survey Report 1965) by Public Administration
Service, Chicago, Illinois
Date:
February 21, 1966
f,1irr 1n
I'. YONT B BEAN
P/.J,"r ~~ Ent:
n,,~,
HENRY L BOWDEN
City Atr-)rney
CHARLES L DAVIS
C mc,r, ·,e,
W LLIM~ S HOWLAND
Dre t •
~ CUR
E,,, :ut
.e
r
RA'/ A NIXON
t,f f C r.~tru<.f n
M 8. SATTERFIELD
E~e D, Ar 1v1tJ Hou-c rr Auther r1
VIILL'A'~ R. WOFFORD
r,.,
" OP ' r
I
Background
Bu 'drn,"
In August 1964, the Mayor and Board of Aldermen adopted
OTHER MEMBER S
DI IAN[ W BECK
fxe
u r
C
rn,;,Jf
t.n
/,
f At-'1,.·11
...1L(Nr.; E B(N~ETT
Exe u',,e O tr> t.
r
AR
',1
P
and approved the submission of an application to the Urban Renewal
KARL A BEJINS
T, ,tt E-igmeer
JACK C DELIUS
Pari, Gere, •.1Jn1gPr
DP J F HACKNEf
') r Pub Hea :n Fv1t
ri
Administration of the Department of Housing and Urban Development
r
C H HILDEBRA"JD
F ,,, Chief
for grant funds under Title I of the Housing Act of 1949, as amended,
PAUL 8 IVE I
L l :J Ag('nt
JOHN H JACOB
,,, I r of l,(,ry,.
to assist in financing the preparation of the Community Improvement
l~E RBERT T JENl-'.INS
P
e Chief
/ILAN F K1EPr>ER
,·· r.
ur tv J.,f m-u~e·
,R JOHN N LET 1N
5 pt
,
Program. A contract between
h
the federal government and the City
PAUL\'.' M,ll ER
hr
J
AICJPR
t '." R( C PARRlq~
I f fe • ,\ I I' 'Jr rg Eng nf'
TrlV~A5 H µ, 8[RT<;,
A
P
Df<
,T
pO,
()
y'll"~'...n,./~
D,r Pub Ye
of Atlanta for the grant funds was approved and executed by the
!..PMP
r...
"
fJ
Mayor and Board of Aldermen in December 1964 . Severa l studies
Pt, Jl l V,t.!R
,'i1tN W ,rks Gt:>r: Mer
are required by virtue of th e application and subsequen t contract.
The enclosed study on governmental a dmi nistrati on is one of these
required studies .
ATLANTA'S MUNICIPAL RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM
�Community Improvement Program
Staff Report
Page 2
Commensurate with the approval of the above application, the Mayor and
Board of Aldermen of the City of Atlanta adopted 11 A Policy Statement on
Community Development 11 which was to serve as an objective framework for
the preparation and development of Atlanta's Community Improvement Program.
Section IV of this policy statement enumerated several objectives pertaining to
governmental and related activities, namely:
l.
11
To more clearly define ~e functions and objectives of the various
agencies and governments involved in the urban development process;
and, to determine the most effective forms of organization needed to
attain these objectives. 11
2.
11
To encourage closer cooperation between the agencies and governments
engaged in redevelopment activities in this region, including the
encouragement of patterns of continuous Iiaison a nd the free exchange
of information 11 ;
3.
11
To seek a dopt ion within the City" government of improved adm inistrative procedures
yie lding greater efficiency . 11
In May 1965, the Mayor and Board of Aldermen of the City of Atlanta, Georgia reta ined
under contra ct Public Administration Service, a non- profit corpora tion of Chicago, Illinois,
to undertake a broad- sca le inventory a nd eva luation of its system of governme nt. Their
examination wa s a lso to include recommendations for governmenta l improvement . Pub lic
Administration Service ha s proven itsel f we ll qua lified for this undertaking in that it has
achieved internationa l acc laim for its exce ll ence in the fie ld of governmental organization
and management stud ies.
�Community Improvement Program
Staff Report
Their report entitled
II
Page 3
Government of the City of Atlanta, Georgia (A Survey
Report 1965), 11 is now complete. It is a constructive report aimed at the broad
overall functions of City government.
The report includes a review of management
practices, administrative procedures, personnel and budgeting policies, planning,
etc. A projected population to double our current size by 1985 and a commensurate
increase in demand for municipal services provided the atmosphere in which this
report was undertaken.
Action
In the months immediately ahead the findings, conclusions and recommendations
contained in this report should receive the objective attention, careful scrutiny and
evaluation of the citizens of Atlanta and their elected representatives. The future
development of the City of Atlanta and the role its government should play may wel I
be governed by the outcome.
_j
�CIT:Y OF ATLANTA
COMMUNITY IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM
CITY HALL •
68 MITCHELL STREET, S. W . •
ATLANTA , GEORGIA 30303 •
February 21, 1966
IVAN ALLEN. JR
".1ayor. City cf At:anra
PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT COMMITTEE
BOARD OF ALDERMEN
RODNEY fl
Ch3Jrrian
COOK,
E GREGORY GRIGGS.
v,ce-Chd rman
ROBERT S DENNIS
E A G'LL,t.M
Cl"ARLES H LEFTWICH
J BEN MOORE
JACK SU.,.MERS
TECHNICAL ADVISORY BOARD
EXECUTIVE COMM/TT[[
R E<RL LA'lDERS
t.j, n A(s l tot'·"' IAcJt ,' Cra.1rr,an
NYONT 8 BEAN
P ar)f) flg Er.g :,eer
HENRY L BOWDEN
C,ty Attc,ney
CHARLES L DAVIS
Comptro er
WILLIAM S HOWLAND
Exe u' ve O,•ecur CA CUR
RAY A NIXON
Ch,et cf Ccn~r,u,..t n
M B SATTERFIELD
Exec O.r. A:Jarta Housing Autr.v,.ty
WILLIAM R WOFFORD
lnspec•r., cl Bwfd•ngs
OTHER MEMBERS
DUM>E W BECK
Exec Dr. C mmun ty C ,,n I ct Atl1nta
GLENN E BWNETT
ExecutveOlfeCl,v ARMPC
KARL A BEVINS
Traff r Engineer
JACK C OHIUS
Park• General f,1an1ger
OR J F HACKNEY
D,r Pub Health. Fult'ln Co
C H HILDEBRAND
Fife Ch,et
PAUL B •VEY
Land Agent
JOHN H JACOBS
Dre( ro, of L brar,:,,
HERBERT T JENKINS
hJ1ceC~1ef
ALAN F K EPPER
To the Mayor and Board of Aldermen
of the City of Atlanta
Gentlemen:
It is our pleasure to transmit herewith the first study
to be completed under Atlanta's Community Improvement
Program, along with a Staff Report on the study.
This is one of eight reports related to urban development and renewal activities being prepared in connection
with the Community Improve me nt Program o Whereas this
report is now complete, the remaining seven reports will
be forwarded to you as they are developed and can be
made availa ble du ring the next year.
Fu f, ,., f"ouriry \1 ·m-:Rer
OR JOHN W lf T ON
Respe ctfully submitted ,
'iupc f
n
PAUL IN MlllER
(h.1,rmm AFCJPR
EMORY C PARPl3H
A 'i r S 1 Ht' H.-.y P 1nr1,r'R [nginet:r
THOMA., H F~CAf P J
Pl u ,ng D, A /, M P
DR T O VI N')ON
Dir Pub I-If> th , d' t:,
PMJL l '.\·£1R
Water W rk"- GPn Mw
George L. Aldr idge, Jr.
GLA,Jr/lm
Enclosure
ATLANTA'S MUNICIPAL RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM
522-4463
GEORGE L ~LDRIDGE Jq
0 rect0r
�CITY OF AT LANT A
COMMUNITY IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM
CITY HALL •
68 MI T CHEL L STREET, S. W. •
ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30303 •
February 21, 1966
VAN ALLPL JR
·.~ay. • C ti 'Ar,:Jnt
PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT COMMITTEE
BOARD OF ALDERMEN
R lDNEY ~'
COOK.
E LREGORY GRIGG"
V ce C".J rm.Jn
ROBERT S. DUl',IS
E A Cilll,AM
CHARLES H LEFTWICH
J BEN 1/00RE
JACK SUMMERS
TECHNICA L ADVISORY BOARD
EXECUTIVE COMMI TTE E
p E_;.r.
r -~ ~R
,:.,
..:· t t •
'/
,'/'1(-NT 8 BEA',
P J"'n '1g Eng ,'"eer
HENRY L BOWDEN
CtyAtt.·rney
CHARLES L DAVIS
Con ptro !er
WILLIAMS HOWLAND
fyecu' ,e O,,ertor, CA
f
Cl' , ..... JI

To al I Department Heads
City of Atlanta
r UR
RAY A NIXON
Chef ,:r C wtru:t n
',I B SATTERFIELD
[Yee Dr. At,anta Hous,ne At1tfl,r l>
WILLIAM R. WOFFORD
fn O t r · 1 Bur/d,ng
OTHER MEMBERS
DUANE W BECK
[x(' L, L -r.mun·!1 Cun
I
f At13r.11
GLf'<N E BENNETT
(x.P u' ve D r"?ct r AP '.1 P
KARL A BEVINS
T, .Jfl Eng,neer
JACK C DELI US
P,1rYs Grreral Man 1ger
DP J F Hf.CKNEY
[ r Put Heath. Fu•t n (
C H HILDEBRAND
Fife r;i,ef
PA JL B
VU
Lar J Ager,t
JOHN H Jf,COB,
,,. t r ii L br J' e
t~tRr.iERT T J£1\jK'1-I
f' ' e Cri,ef
Al AN F KlfPPfR
r r n f Ii' ry ,t~ m JR
,f? uHU W LET
N
Ui.. •
PA
f
It is our pleasure to transmit herewith the first study
to be completed under Atlanta's Community Improvement
Program, along with a Staff Report on the study.
This is one of eight reports related to urban development and renewal activities being prepared in connection
with the Community Improvement Program. Whereas this
report is now complete, the remaining seven reports will
be forwarded to you as they are developed and ca n be
made avai Iable during the next year .
Respectfully submi t ted ,
,,
W '.'IL ER
.i ,1
Ar r J f- A
(M lh C PARRISH
t , 1e Hi"/ Pt:,n
I OMAS H <CB[RT
f ir r ng {-' , A R M t
OR
Gentlemen:
f ng n('er
T O V NSUN
{ r F Jb He
!t
Geo rge L Ald ridge , Jr.
1' 1 b
P JL, NE R
.~- , r W rk
J r:
·~1er
G LA,Jr/l m
Enc losu re
ATLANTA'S MUNICIPAL RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM
522-4463
GEORGE L
o·,ectvr
LCq'DC:£
�~
-
.FULTON COUNTY TAX LEVIES
IN CITY. OF ATLANTA' .
~ :,_ , ;,,
PER $1 , 000. 00
Afj SESSMENT
.
~'
l
(B)
195i
State
$1.50
$5.00
,.'
J
Courlt'y
Operation
!(A)
County
Bonds
' ',


\,'\. I->- ,


C
I
County
·." Wide
School
., • ' I
$2.00 "·. $20.00
Total
State &
County
._i
. r'
L:,_
$28.50
1952
1.50
.25
2.00
19.00
1953
1.50
.25
2.00
19.00
22.75
1954
1.50
.25
2.00
19.00
22.75
1.75
18.25
.21. 75


1


JI!'
22.75
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0
1955
1.50
.25
1956
1.50
·.25
1.50
17.50
1,957
1.50
· .25.
1.75
17.25
)
· ' !
{,.i
. ;"';.··
1958
i.so
.25
2.25
16.75
1959
1.50
· .25
2.00
17.00
20.75
1960
1.50
.25
2.75
17.00
21.50
1961
1.$0
.25
3.15
16.60
1962
1.50
· ;25
2.77
19.63
1.50
· .25
1964
1.50
1965
1..50
~
I•
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f
21.50
2.77
16.98
21.50
. • 25
2.77
16.98
21.50
.25
2.33
18.42
22.50
' .,.,
'
,. '
.
20.75
16.98
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0
To calculat e : (1965)
Gross x 2.33_·
Net x 2.0 .17
•22.50. Mills.
!
!//1
(a)
(b)
not allowed on
I nc ludes.


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FULTON COUNTY MILLAGE TAX LEVIES
Outside City of At lanta
~
Inside Atlanta
· State· & Count:,
Total
.,


, ·~' ·- '


\


~--




·' · 11ii·




.
..
School
· \ Outside



Bonds~ Operating ~: Total




1951
28.5
3. '
1952
22.75
3 • .. ,..
1953
22.75
3 • . •'
15.
1954
22.75
3• . .
15.
1955
21.75
4. · ..
15.
20.75
4. ,_
46.5
15.
.:I
1956
1957
4. ·
20.75
':
40.75
.,',
.,·
20.s
G5.25
.>
,'



,?1




20.5





1958
20.75
4.
20.5
1959
20.75
5.
20.5
1960
21.50
5.
1961
21.50
5.5
23.
1962 -
21.50
5.5
24.


1963


21.50
5.5
25.
1964
21.50
5.5
25.
1965
22.50
5.5
~
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25.
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Homestea~ exemption ($2,000) not
To _Calculate:
-:,
, •I
I ,
, .. :r ..
Gro_s s
Net·
X i.83
X 45.17
· 53.00 Mills


If in Sandy Springs add 4.5 mills


(-$2,000)
Assessment based
on
,;;·t.,,:if)rtt:r
..
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~
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25% market
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CITY OF ATLANTA


MILLAGE TAX LEVIES


.
DEBT
PARK
SCHOOLS TOTAL
CITY
. OPERATION. SERVICE IMPROVE."'.'. ·.


1; 1 .


MENTS .. · 1._ _ _ _1·i_:i1___

1952
1953
14~1/2
14;.l/2

~1
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.' 14~1/2
14~1/2


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1/2 :. I,
3
•i' f
2-1/2
1957
7~1/2
.0
~ -·
3-1/2
1959
9.
3-1/2
.
1960
0
~
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1/2 . jl/ 16-1/4 . 29-1/4
'
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1/2 I :,. jr· ~ 16-1,/ 4
-1"
1
1
. {/
9-1/4
J16-1/4.· ._·::29-1/.4
'
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·
l /2 .;1.; 16 • 1_/ 4· 2 9~ 1 / 4
3-1/2
' 1/2
I'
.
' .
16-1/4 :. 29-1/4
1963
9 :_
3-1/2
1/2
19
32
1964
9
,9
1/2
1/2
1/2
19
·1965
1966
3-1/2
3-1/2
3-1/2
32
32
32
9.

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1962
")_ J ',
8-1/2 ',J.2 6-1/2
·' ; •r ·
3•1/2

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1961.
I
·:.:r· 'l'i 14-1/2 y. 25
3-1/2 •;: 1/2 : , I'.
9.
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r~~ 8-112
. j!
9:

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2-1/2 . 1/2
1958
I
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. 112 ..
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1956
J/J' •
1/2 · .!: :-~ 7
"i' ~n Id
1955
· · '·. ·25
· 112 '. li·! ' 7
3
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1954
,· ,• • l ~
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, :. ·· 1 /2
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3
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3
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.
19
19
Levie s for Debt Service and School Operstion are
a ppl ied · before deduction for Homestead Exemption.
In 1963 ; Schools increased 2 3/4 Mills.
'•
·,
of
A max imum
$2~000.00 is allowed for Homestead
Exempt i .o n.
TAXES PAYABLE JULY 1ST THRU AUGUST 15TH . ~{i•/ ·..,;
i
I
DEL INQUENT .·AFTER AUGUST
15TII. .
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City 35% of Marke~.- yalue ; '\
Assessm~n t s :
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OFFICE OF CLERK OF BOARD OF ALDERMEN
CITY OF ATLANTA, GEORGIA
- ~-
March 7, 1966
RESOLUTION BY
FINANCE COMM ITTEE:
WHEREAS 9 the General Assembly of the State of Georgia, at the regular
session in 1966 0 passed House Bill No •. 86 which provides for the
annexation to the incorporated limits of Atlanta certain unincorporated
areas of Fulton County known as Sandy Sprin gs and Adamsville, effective
January 1 1 1967 provided, however 9 such annexation is approved by the
voters of each of the areas in a referendum to be held May 11, 1966,
and
WHEREAS, Fulton County has issued business licenses, building permits,
and other licenses and permits in each of the areas 9 some of which will
extend beyond the January ·1 0 1 96 7 annexation date, and
WHEREAS 0 the City has, under previous annexations , honored the licenses
and permits issued by Fulton County, and in keeping with said policy,
the City desires to extend this privilege to the citizens of the
Sandy Springs and Adamsville Areas if such areas should be annexed
to the City of Atlanta 9
THEREFORE 9 BE IT RESOLVED BY THE MAYOR AND BOARD OF ALDE RMEN OF THE
CITY OF ATLANTA that the licenses and permits issued by Fulton County
to business establishments a nd citizens of the Sandy Springs and
Adamsville areas be and are hereby honored by the off icials of the
City of Atlanta until such licenses or pe rmits shall expire or
terminate if the respective areas should be annexed to the City of
At lanta.
ADOPTED By Board of Aldermen Mar ch 7, 1966
APPROVED March 9, 1966
A true copy,
.j
�OFFICE OF CLERK OF BOi.RD OF ALDERMEN
CITY OF ATLANTA, GEORGIA
A RESOLUTION
BY ZONING COMMITTEE
BE IT RESOLVED by the Mayor and Board of Aldermen of
the City of Atlanta as follows:
1.
That within any territory hereafter annexed
to the City of Atlanta, zoning designations
as established and use permits, as approved by
Fulton County prior to January 1, 1967, will
be honored by the City of Atlanta and will remain
in effect.
2.
That a ny law f ul use of property permitted under
the zoning regulations of Fulton County and existing
on Janu ary 1, 1967, may continue in effect after
annexation.
ADOPTED By Board of Aldermen March 21, 1966
APPROVED March 22, 1966
of Aldermen
�~nalysis of$ 51.91 differential in taxes and charges levied on$ 15,000 home in
_f.:3.Ildy
Springs and City of Atlanta-Fulton County.
Sandy Springs
Levy
City-County
Increase or (Decrease)
in event of annexation
County Bond
8.74
8.74
County Wide Bond Tax
2.62
2.62
.44
.44
County Operating
32.24
32.24
County School Bonds
20.63
None
(20.63)
7.87
None
( 7.87)
43.75
None
(43.75)
None
18.38
18.38
City School Operating
Non•
99.75
99.75
City General Operations
None
29.25
29.25
Park Levy
None
1.62
1.62
State
.
Sandy Springs Fire District
County School Operating
"-
City Bond Tax
Sub Totals- Property
116.29
193.04
Sanitary Charge
28.00
22.00
( 6.00)
water
37.68
18.84
(18.84)
181.97
233.88
51.91
Taxes
Total
I
�-------., Mr. Bob Lyle,
Memo t o :
Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr., Mr
de
Mr . Collier Gladin, Dr. John Letson
From:
P • Baker
Subject:
March 28th Forum on Sandy Springs, sponsored by the
Sandy Springs Businessmen's Association, formerly the
Greater Sandy Springs Association
7:30 p.m., Sandy Springs High School Auditorium
Format wJ.11 be as f ollows:
"Pron aide will have fifteen minutes (will split 5 minutes
per man, alternf,lting 1t h "Conu side., our speakers will be~
!
Howard Stark$, Co -Chairman , S ndy Springs/Atlanta
·
Team for Tomorrow
Don Rutherford , Committee Member
J1m Golden, Oommitt · e Member
C & S Bank )
Retai l Credit)
Ford Mot or Oo.)
"Conu aide will a l oo fifte n minutes, same arrangement as
abov . Th ir speakers will 'bet
l
Tomi . Wes ley, JI'.
Eugene Simmons
A.B. Hunter
Then e ch s1d
Allen~Grayson Realty )
Attorney )
soma rese roh firm)
will h ve · 7 l/2 min. r buttal.
Following this, qu stions will be posed from the audience,
in writing o l under tand, and th person po ing the qu t1on
will go to ingl mike to ddres . hia question to on of th
sp ak r or to
m mber or th
ource p nel, which conei~t of
the following:
yor Iv n A11 ·n
County Comm . Ch. Arohi
rl
nd·
rs
Lind ey
f
/
Al n K 1pper
Dr. John L tson
Dr. P ul w t
co111 · r Gladin
Dick Forb
mb r of Joint T x A
R p. from S Und r
a.
mb r of tb SS/A TFT will b pr s nt nd
to pos
qu t1cn to both "Pro" nd "Con" id
for mot rrectiv
pr ent t1on or r 1 t oto and is u · . If you h . v · ny qu tion
you w nt
k
of you or ot oth r id, pl
put in wr1t1
with
prob bl
nsw r · nd 1ve to Mo ·rd St rk or Bill · rr prior to
th
orum tonight. Bill' numb r 1s 521-0845, How d' 1
588- 2.9.
�' J .,
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�QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS
Boulder Park Referendum
May 11, 1966
The facts and figures in this booklet have been thoroughly checked and approved by the City of Atlanta.
�PREFACE
In the referendum to be held May 11, 1966, the people of Boulder Park are
being offered an opportunity to join the City of Atlanta and to help make a
great city even greater. It will be the first time this question has been
considered by the Boulder Park voters.
This booklet contains questions and answers dealing with the main issues
involved in the referendum. The information was compiled by the Atlanta
Chamber of Commerce, with the full cooperation of the City of Atlanta.
All the facts herein have been thoroughly checked by the City of Atlanta
and their accuracy confirmed.
CONTENTS
Page
Ad Valorem Taxes ...
1
A Comparison of Taxes
3
Representation in Local Government
5
Growth and Zoning . . . . . . . . . . . .
6
Fire Protection and Fire Insurance
8
Police Protection
9
Sanitation Service
10
Water Service
. ........................ . .. . ....
11
Schools
.. . . ............... . .. .. ... .....
12
Sewers
.. . .......................... .......
13
Street Lights and Traffic Signals
14
Streets and Sidewalks . . . . . . . .
15
�.,
,• ..-1,
~
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w
0
5,000 FEET
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Q. -· What would happen to m y tax bill? How much more would it cost me
to receive the improved services inside the city?
A. - The ad valorem taxes on your home and personal property would be
higher inside the city, but the increase in taxes would be largely offset by reductions in other charges. In almost every case, the net
result would be only a moderate ine-rease in the total. In some cases,
the homeowner would pay less inside the city.
As an example, consider the effect on one of the homes taken from a
random survey of Boulder Park residences . The example is a singlefamily frame dwelling. Its value, for tax purposes, is 14,920. The
1965 Fulton County real estate tax bill on this prope rty was 107. 35
and the personal property tax was j 32. 33 -- a total tax of $139. 68.
If the home had been inside the city, the county and city real estate
tax would have been _$ 191. 63 and the personal property tax would have
been $33. 25 for a total tax of 224. 88 . The increase inside the city
would have been $85. 20.
This increase in ad valorem taxes would have been largely offset by
lower charges in two areas: Water and fire insurance. The actual
water bill for this residence la st year was $80 . 02 , which is very
close to the average bill shown in a survey of some 25 homes in the
Boulder Park area. Inside the city, the water bill would have been
~40. 30, a decrease of 39. 72
It is more difficult to arrive at the exact saving possible in lower
insurance r at es for the homeowner, becaus e of the several different
types of insurance he might choose. But a good e stimate can be
obtained by comparing the rates for "straight fire insurance" on his
dwelling. Since the va lue of his lot makes up part of the total value
of his prop er ty, a ssume that his dwelling is value d at $ 12, 000 of
the $ 14, 92 0 total . Straight fir e insurance on this amount would be
$120 . 6Q_in Boulde r Par k, which has a Clas s 10 r ating . Inside
Atlanta, which ha s a Class 3 r a ting, the sa me fire insur ance would
cost $25.2 0, a difference of 95.40.
The s anitary servic e c harge fo r this home is $21. 00 at pr esent . In
the c ity the c harge would be $22. 00 for greatly impr oved service .
Thus, in the example, an ad valorem tax incr ease of. 85. 20 and an
incre ase of j
00 ·n s a nitary service charge would be offset by
savings of_ 39. 72 (water) and $.a5_.-4.0 (fire insurance ). The net
difference would be a saving of $48. 92 if the home were inside the
city.
Another "intangible" saving will work to the benefit of homeowners
when they file federal and state income taxes . Both federal and state
income tax procedures allow local tax payments to be claimed as a
"deduction" . Payments for such items as water and insurance are
-1-
�not "deductible." This means that the homeowner inside the city -whose property taxes are higher and other charges lower -- can
deduct a greater portion of his total payments for income tax
purposes.
The net effect on his income tax bill would vary, depending on the
income bracket and other factors. But a conservative estimate is
that the typical homeowner could reduce his combined federal and
state income taxes by about 20 per cent of the additional amount
deductible for ad valorem taxes.
In other words, the taxpayer in the example shown above could
deduct $85. 20 more if he were inside the city, and the estimated
saving on his income taxes would be $17. 04. Considering all
aspects of his taxes and charges, the homeowner cited in the
example would actually save almost $70. 00 by being inside the
city, while enjoying improved services.
- 2-
�A COMPARISON OF TAXES AND CHARGES
FOR SEVERAL TYPICAL HOMEOWNERS
(Boulder Park - City of Atlanta)
In the following examples - all of which are actual residences in a random survey of Boulder Park homes - the
ad valorem taxes, water bill and sanitation charges paid in 1965 are compared with what the same items would
have been if the homes had been inside the corporate limits of the City of Atlanta. The "net change" shown does
not reflect the saving in fire insurance, which would range from a few dollars to a substantial amount, depending
on type of dwelling, its value, location, type of insurance, etc. The change also does not include the savings on
federal and state income tax deductions. See page 1 and 2.
Value
of Home
Example #1
@
Example #2
Example #3
Example #4
Example #5
$14,800
17, 120
19.760
11,600
17,200
Assessment
Co. $3,700
City 5,180
Co. 4,280
City 5,990
Co. 4,940
City 6,920
Co. 2,900
City 4,050
Co. 4,300
City 6,020
Real Estate
Tax
Personal
Property Tax
Water Bill
$105.76
189. 67
$19.61
20.17
$60.31
30.31
$21. 00
22.00
+ 83.91
+
. 56
- 30. 00
+ 1. 00
136.50
228.64
+ 92.14
28.09
28.89
+ .80
248.17
132.68
-115. 49
21. 00
14. 00
- 7. 00
171. 48
273.25
+101. 77
46.64
47.96
+ 1. 32
77.83
39.19
- 38.64
21. 00
22.00
+ 1. 00
+
65.45
63.36
135.51
+ 72.15
21. 73
22.35
+ .62
53. 74
26.98
- 26.76
21. 00
18. 00
- 3.00
+
43.01
137.56
230.05
57.77
59.41
50.82
25.50
21. 00
18.00
+ 92.49
+ 1. 64
- 25.32
- 3.00
+
65.81
Sanitation
Net Change
+
55.47
29.55
�Value
of Home
Example #6
Example #7
Example #8
Example # 9
18,280
14,920
7,800
20,040
Assessment
Co. 4,570
City 6,400
Co.
City
3,730
5,220
Co. 1, 950
City 2,720
Co. 5,010
City 7,010
Real Estate
Tax
151. 87
248.29
Personal
Property Tax Water Bill
29.15
29.98
Sanitation
69. 8 0
35.12
21. 00
22.00
Net Change
+ 96.42
+
. 83
- 34.68
+ 1.00
+ 63.57
107. 35
191. 63
+ 84.28
32.33
33.25
+ . 92
80.02
40.30
39.72
21. 00
22.00
+ 1.00
+ 46.48
15.27
72.58
+ 57. 31
4.24
4.36
+ .12
95.35
48.07
- 47.28
21. 00
14. 00
-7.00
+
175.19
.277. 70
+102. 51
63.07
64.86
+ 1. 79
160.32
81. 00
- 79.32
21. 00
22.00
+ 1. 00
+ 25.98
166 . 71
266. 75
+100. 04
23.32
23.98
+ .66
38.41
19. 21
21. 00
22.00
- 19. 20
+ 1. 00
3.15
I
~
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E xample # 10
19,400
Co. 4,850
City 6,780
+ 82.50
�REPRESENTATION IN LOCAL GOVERNMENT
Q. - What representation would I have in local government? Other than being
able to vote in elections involving city offices and city issues, how would
my voice in local matters be increased?
A. - You would have more representation in local government, and you would
have a greater voice in matters affecting your community because you
would be closer to your representatives.
The legislative act which provides for the referendum in Boulder Park
spells out that the area would join the city as part of the present Seventh
Ward. The ward is represented by two members of the Board of Aldermen
and one member of the Board of Education, plus two members of the City
Executive Committee. All of these are elected. Residents of Boulder
Park could vote in the next city election in 1969 for these and other offices.
The Boulder Park area presently is governed by, and participates in the
election of, a three-man county commission. County commissioners
must be responsive to the citizens of all areas of the county, and rightly
so, since they represent all the county. The five members of the Fulton
County Board of Education, each representing a school district, are
appointed by the Grand Jury for five-year terms. The county school
superintendent is elected by county-wide vote.
By having two aldermen, both residing in their ward, Boulder Park
citizens would have a stronger voice in matters of local government
and, in effect, would be closer to their elected representatives. In
future elections they would vote in the election of Atlanta's mayor, the
president of the Board of Aldermen, all members of the Board of
Aldermen and Board of Education, and two members of the City
Executive Committee from their own ward. Their ward also would
be reprE:sented on other boards, such as the Atlanta Public Library
Board of Trustees. Additionally, the area's representation would be
enhanced by the appointment of its aldermen to various aldermanic
committees which would deal with matters pertaining specifically to
the Boulder Park area, as well as those affe cting the city as a whole.
- 5-
�GROWTH AND ZONING
Q. - What would happen in the field of zoning and future development of the
Boulder Park area?
A. - You could expect the Boulder Park area to continue to develop as primarily
a low density single-family community. Future apartment and commercial
development could be expected to take place along portions of the major
thoroughfares with emphasis on strong neighborhood commercial centers
at appropriate intervals as opposed to continuous strip commercial
development.
Property would be reclassified into the City of Atlanta zoning district
which most closely resembles the classification under which it is presently zoned in the Fulton County Zoning Ordinance.
Zoning designations as established and use permits as approved by Fulton
County prior to January 1, 1967 will be honored by the City of Atlanta,
and will remain in effect.
Public hearings for consideration of proposed zoning changes in the area
would be held only four times a year, following the area system as is
presently being used in Atlanta. These hearings are held only by the
Zoning Committee after receiving recommendations by the staff of the
Planning Department and the Atlanta-Fulton County Joint Planning
Board. The decision of the Zoning Committee receives final action
by the full Board of Aldermen and Mayor.
The Atlanta Zoning Ordinance contains district classifications which
closely relate to those in the Fulton County Ordinance, a lthough similar
classifications in Atl anta generally contain more restrictive requirements. In addition to these similar districts the Atlanta Ordinance
contains s everal new classifications which permit only a highly selective number of uses with regulations whic h permit and encourage
high development standards. These classifications provide for a
reasonable use of certain properties while permitting only the best
developme nt for the community.
A brief description of these new districts follows :
1.
The "R-9 Single- Family Dwelling Group District" provides
for the construction of townhouse units for individual unit
sale under condominium ownership. Units may not be rented
under this district. The di s trict provide s for a maximum of
twelve dwelling units per acre and a maximum ground coverage
of thirty-five percent including buildings, parking and drives.
Se ve ral fine townhouse developments are presently under
construction in Atlanta. unde r the provisions of this district.
- 6-
�2.
The "A-L Apartment-Limited Dwelling District" provides for
low-density, high-standard apartment developments generally
compatible with substantial single-family residential areas.
The district permits garden apartments (two story units) at a
maximum of twelve dwelling units per acre and permits only
thirty-five percent ground coverage including buildings,
parking and drives.
3.
The "C-L Commercial Limited District" permits primarily
office and institutional uses and a few selected retail studios
and shops. Signs must be attached to the wall of the building
and be only twenty square feet in size. This district provides
often for a reasonable use of portions of the major thoroughfare while discouraging all the inherent ill effects of continuous
strip commercial retail zoning. It has been found to be generally
compatible with certain residential uses as well.
Work would begin immediately to include the Boulder Park area in the
comprehensive planning process now underway in the City of Atlanta.
This comprehensive planning process is made up of four elements as
follows:
1.
Projected future land use needs and their location as a guide to
future rezoning evaluations.
2.
Designation of Major Thoroughfares and their future effect on
the adjacent use of land.
3.
Plans for needed community facilities such as parks, schools
and libraries along with general locations.
4.
The programming of improvements and source of funds necessary
to implement these future plans.
-7-
�FIRE PROTECTION AND FIRE INSURANCE
Q. - How would my fire protection be affected? What would this mean in regard
to what I pay for my fire insurance ?
A. - Your fire insurance rates would be reduced substantially, but, even more
important, better fire protection would be afforded to your home or business.
Fire protection and fire insurance rates go hand in hand. The better the
protection available to you, the less you must pay for fire insurance.
Ratings are assigned to particular areas on the basis of fire protection
facilities and other factors. Fire insurance rates, in turn, are determined by a formula based on the rating.
'
The City of Atlanta has a Class 3 rating, which compares very favorably
with other cities of similar size across the nation. Atlanta has kept well
within the requirements of its Class 3 rating by building, equipping and
maintaining fire stations at key points throughout the city, and by assuring
an ample water supply in every area. Fire protection, in short, is excellent
and fire insurance rates are as low as the rates in all but a few major cities.
~
The Boulder Park area, on the other hand, has no fire protection available
at the present time. As a result, the area has a Class 10 rating. Rates
for straight fire insurance under the Class 10 rating are enormously
higher than the rates under Class 3 -- as much as five and a half times
greater in the case of a frame dwelling.
The Fulton County Commission has passed a resolution declaring a new
fire district, known as the Fulton Industrial Fire District, which encompasse s the Boulder Park area. The county has petitioned the City
of Atlanta to contract the justified fir e protection services for the new
district to earn a Class 6 rating. Those in the Fulton Industrial Fire
District would pay a special fire tax levy of seven mills to satisfy this
contract. It is expected that the contract will be realized during 1966.
Should the citizens of the Boulder Park area voice their desire in the
May 11 r eferendum to become part of Atlanta, thus s eparating the mselves fr om the Indus tr ial Fir e Dis trict, the y would become part of
Atlanta's Class 3 rating and would realize the same fire protection as
similar portions of the city.
The City of Atlanta already has plans to construct a new fire station
in the Adamsville area dur ing 1966. This station, as well a s othe r
c ity fire units in the s urrounding area, would respond to fire ca lls
in the Boulder Park area, thus m eeting the requirem ent s of the
Southeastern Unde rwrite r s.
Thus, by voting to be come part of Atla nta, Boulder P ark re sidents
could expect thei r fire ins urance r a tes to be reduced at the time they
joined the city (Ja nuary 1, 196 7 ) a nd they would not pay the proposed
s even- mill fire tax for t he additional prot ect ion.
-8 -
�POLICE PROTECTION
Q. - What changes would occur in police protection? Would the city build a
new precinct station in Boulder Park?
A. - Police protection would be expanded and improved -- and the basic
concept would change from the type of service provided in rural areas
to the "full-service" protection afforded in a heavily populated urban
area . No additional stations are contemplated in any area of the city,
at present.
Boulder Park presently receives its police service from the City of
Atlanta under a contract arrangement with Fulton County. The only
laws enforceable are state l aws , which are designed, for the most
part, for rural areas. Anyone arrested as a violator of a state law
must be turned over to the Fulton County sheriff for trial in a state
court.
If the area chooses to join the city, it would be necessary to increase
immediately the radio patrol service now provided, add foot patrolmen
for duty in business districts, and add motorcycle patrolmen for traffic
and patrol duty. In addition, the citizens of the Boulder Park area would
receive the benefit of all the services and facilities of the Juvenile Crime
Preve ntion Squad and the special squads in the Detective Department,
which are not now available to the area. Policemen would enforce city
ordinances, as well as state laws, the same as they are enforced in the
rest of Atlanta at present.
The City of Atlanta presently has approximately 1. 5 policemen for every
1,000 population. The city is striving not only to maintain that ratio but
to improve it for the increased protection of all its citizens.
As for adding precinct stations, the trend is away from the precinct
concept in these days of two-way radio communications and other modern
facilities. A radio patrol car, manned by two officers or even just one,
is literally a "traveling precinct station." With radio communications,
the patrolman c an call for assistance and have other officers at his side
within mome nts. The city has no plans for adding precinct stations, and
the emphasis will continue to be on mobility and close communications
by radio.
. - 9-
�SANITATION SERVICE
Q. - How would my garbage pickup and other sanitation services be affected
if Boulder Park joins the city? Would I have to pay more?
A. - Your sanitation service would be expanded and improved, and many
residents actually would pay less than they pay now. The maximum
increase would be a dollar a year, or just two cents a week more.
As a resident of Atlanta, you would begin receiving several services
which are not now available to you -- rubbish pickup, street cleaning,
dead animal removal, sanitary inspection, and "guttering," which
means periodic removal of grass and other obstructions from street
gutters. It is the city's responsibility to bring all these services to
its citizens, as well as providing two garbage collections each week.
You are presently receiving only one garbage pickup each week.
For these additional services, your sanitation charge would be a
maximum of $22. 00 a year, as compared to the $21. 00 a year you
are now paying for far less service. The $22. 00 charge is figured
on a base charge of $6. 00, plus $4. 00 for each 25 feet of lot frontage
or fraction thereof, but not to exceed the $22. 00 a year maximum for
residences. Some residents would pay as little as $14. 00 a year.
Business establishments throughout the area now pay for garbage
collection on the basis of the actual cost of rendering the service.
Most businesses would realize a substantial saving by being a part
of the city -- and would receive improved service as well.
An estimated 800 homes in Boulder Park are getting garbage collection
service (one pickup each week) at this time, according to the City of
Atlanta Department of Sanitary Engineering. Full service would be
extended to these residents immediately after their area became part
of the city. The maximum charge for even the most remote residence
would be only $22 . 00 per year.
A survey of city sanitary services is being conducted at this time
by the Public Administration Service. The findings of the survey,
which will be available soon, will result in improved services.
Any change in rate schedules will apply to both city residents and
county residents receiving city services under contract with the
county government.
-10-
�WATER SERVICE
Q. - What difference, if any, would there be in the way water is supplied
to my home or business? Would my water bill be affected?
A. - The only difference would be on your water bill, which would be
cut in half.
Virtually all the existing homes and businesses in the Boulder Park
area already receive their water from the City of Atlanta Water
Department under an arrangement between the city and Fulton
County. Users outside the city, however, are billed for water at
a double rate. The minimum monthly water bill for the City of
Atlanta users is $1. 57; for those outside the city, the minimum
is $3. 14 per month. Thus, the annual savings for water users
inside the city is at least $18.14.
In reality, savings run much higher than the minimum, however.
Atlanta people are accustomed to having a plentiful supply of good
water at low rates, and they use it in quantity. Experience has
shown that very few homes, inside or outside the city, use little
enough water to be billed for the minimum.
An actual survey of some 25 homes in the Boulder Park area,
chosen at random, showed that the average water charge paid
during 1965 was $78. 32. Only one of these homes was within
a dollar of the minimum bill, and three of the larger users paid
bills of $131.12, $160. 32 a nd $248. 17.
If the se same home s had been inside the city, their water bills
for 1965 would have averaged $39. 78. The average savings would
have been $38. 53 per home .
- -11 -
�SQH @L i
Q. - What changes would occur in the schools my children attend? What would
be done about school bus transporation, since the Atlanta system does not
have free transportation?
A. - Several major differences would occur in the way of advantages: Kindergartens in the Atlanta system schools; a greater emphasis at the high
school level on vocational programs, in addition to the college preparatory
and general programs; and the benefit of more specialized programs and
more technical specialists.
In general, the curricula of the Atlanta system and the Fulton County system
are similar, as are the personnel policies, overall operational procedures
and financial structures.
However, the salary schedules for teachers are somewhat higher in the
Atlanta system. In general, Atlanta teachers are paid 8. 9 per cent more
than Fulton County teachers. Any teachers who become a part of the
Atlanta School System would transfer directly to the city's pension plan
without loss of any money or benefits. Atlanta and Fulton school officials
agree that pension benefits of both systems are practically the same.
A survey by the Atlanta School System showed that there are 380 pupils
in the area included in the May 11 referendum ·-- 270 elementary school
children and 110 in high school. Of these, 69 already are attending
Atlanta schools: 54 elementary pupils in Fain, Oglethorpe, Stanton,
Towns and West Haven schools, and 15 high scho'ol students in Harper,
Turner and West Fulton schools. The remaining 216 elementary pupils
attend East Point Elementary School, and the other 95 high school
students attend South Fulton (in East Point), Thomas (in College Park)
and Lakeshore (in College Park).
A 14-room elementary school is under construction in the Boulder Park
area and will be available for occupancy in September, 1966. School
officials say it is possible this school could help relieve some of the
overcrowding in adjacent schools, such as Fain and Towns. Additionally,
two other sites in the area have been secured for future construction of
an elementary school and a high school .
As for the loss of bus transportation, officials say this problem would be
dealt with right away. The Fulton County system provides free bus transportation for pupils who live further than 1-1/2 miles from school, and
this expense is covered by local and state funds . On the other hand, the
Atlanta Transit System provides bus transportation for Atlanta system
pupils on routes determined by pupil need and with pupils paying as they
ride. Robert Sommerville, president of Atlanta Transit System, has
given assurance that school bus routes would be provided for pupils in
a r eas joining the city.
-12-
�SEWERS
Q. - Would there be any major changes in the system of sewer service?
Would I be assessed any sewer charges before sewer service is
extended to my home ?
A. - If your home is already on a sewer line, or if you have a working
septic tank, you probably would see no immediate changes that
would affect you. Certainly, there would be no sewer assessment
charged until sewer service is provided.
The city already has made a preliminary study of the probable needs
of the area, and it would undertake to make the necessary improvements and additions as soon as possible. However, your present
situation would largely govern the effect on you and your home.
For example, if your home already is served by a sewer line, you
would see nothing different. You would continue receiving the
service with no special charges or other changes, except where
such might be applied city-wide. If your home is served by a
working septic tank in good condition, then you would not be
affected until a sewer line is extended to your street. Even
when this occurred, you could be granted as long as six years
to pay the assessment which is always made for this service.
If sewer service were brought to your neighborhood for the first
time -- this is always by petition of the residents -- then your
property would be assessed on a front-footage basis for the sewer
line in front of your property. This assessment is set by law at
$3. 50 per front foot. The connection to your home from the sewer
line, if the line were laid on a street that is already paved, would
be between $80 and $120. And again, if you already have a satisfactory septic tank, you could be allowed up to six years to pay the
assessment.
This policy exists in the case of already existing residences and
does not apply to vacant property, however .
- 13-
�STREET LIGHTS AND TRAFFIC SIGNALS
Q. - Would the city provide street lights in my neighborhood right away?
What would be done about traffic signals?
A. - As a general policy, the City of Atlanta provides street lights in areas
as requested by the residents, and it has kept up with demands since
the 1952 Plan of Improvement.
No wholesale program of street light installation is anticipated in any
part of the city, because of budget limitations. In other words, a
neighborhood that has not expressed a positive desire for this service
need not fear that street lights would be forced on them. However,
the city, through its Traffic Engineering Department, has been attentive to the requests of those who do want lights and is currently
right on schedule in meeting these demands. Additionally, a program
of upgrading street lights on major thoroughfares is in progress to
bring these facilities up to the latest recommended standards.
A preliminary survey in the Boulder Park area has shown that some
18 street lights are currently in use, all on local streets. The estimated
needs for arterial streets include 80 lights, which, obviously, could not
be installed all at once. The estimated needs for local streets are for
some 221 additional lights, which would be undertaken by the city on the
basis of requests by the residents.
-
In general, the city installs traffic signals at intersections where traffic
conditions satisfy the "warrants" set out by uniform national standards,
as adopted and prescribed by the Georgia Highway Department. However,
Atlanta citizens on occasion have shown a desire for and have provided
the necessary funds to have signals installed at some intersections
where the "warrants" are not fully met. This can be accomplished at
intersections where signals are a help to traffic movement and a convenience to the citizens.
No traffic signals are now in service in the Boulder Park area, but one
new signal may be needed in the next two to three years, according to
the city survey.
�STREETS AND SIDEWALKS
Q. - What could Boulder Park expect in the way of street and sidewalk
improvements, now and in the future? How can we get sidewalks
or streets paved, and how much would it cost?
A. - A survey by the City of Atlanta Department of Construction found
two streets in the Boulder Park area in "below average" condition
-- Fairburn Road and part of Boulder Park Drive. Both of these
will require resurfacing in the very near future, the Construction
Department said. The city has pledged to assign a high priority
to these projects. The other streets in the area are in "good" or
"average" condition and will not require immediate work.
Paving of streets and sidewalks in the City of Atlanta, with two
exceptions, requires a petition signed by more than 50 per cent
of the property owners involved. Property owners are assessed
for the cost of the paving on a front-footage basis. The average
assessment for sidewalks in residential areas (six-foot sidewalks)
is about $2. 60 per front foot, and property owners are allowed up
to four years to pay. Charges for street paving vary with the size
of the project, but the assessment generally is between $6. 50 and
$7. 50 per front foot for paving and curbing. Property owners are
allowed up to 10 years to pay the assessments for street paving and
up to four years to pay for curbing.
The two exceptions to the petition method are for sidewalks which
are deemed necessary for reasons of safety, and for sidewalks in
front of schools. If a sidewalk is required for public safety, the
city may put one in without being petitioned and then assess property
owners on a front-footage basis. Sidewalks in front of schools are
built at city expense, with no petition required .
In line with its policy on school sidewalks, the City of Atlanta would
move as quickly as possible to install sidewalks in front of the new
elementary school now under construction in the Boulder Park area.
- 15-
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EXECUTIVE VICE PRE S IDENT
May 18, 1966
Dear Earl:
A million thanks for your help in
our efforts to make Sandy Springs
a part of the City. We certainly
feel that a lot of progress was
made, just not enough.
Let's hope that one day these people
become aware of the vast opportunities
Atlanta affords, and will share our
feelings.
Mr. Earl Landers
Administrative Assistant
to the Mayor
68 Mitche ll Street , S.W.
At l anta , Georgi a
�Much compl11i11t ill timannt:1.ng ftcJnt tht:1
Gt1Vutt1ment C.1\Tet' the f ,u:t tha l: llt11ne
BVdngs GttHll> objected to 1:hl!
At I.Mlt t\ Cl:lt y
ttlllmhou ot. I~ a1t\ra R~~ily
jIr o 1mt e nr At t ~tl~~ dj.~y
Officials, a ttott1eya, a nd 11cli11hl Jll(HldHl:or\dMII ~
u~ tt1111I
h~tk
fot pro-atttte>ce tit1nU t clebal:e l·N1
THE tAcT
cm
t'I-lll: t~M"t'e:R tS ~hat Pui IPh Ohl.int~
Of ticials, a l though quit ra oot1t'l:.ibllll 11n1l hal pt tH
nat1.1ta of t heir jobs, Betvfo1t
to take t ha same . partis an
flt
AiL
, hettJll..ls ll tJt 1:11
l' tJt,TOH CCIUH'J1Y• 111'11
1111l CHt
ot
not
At lant ll _,mi, l.b)'ti
10>1.
fJ
hn ,1
ad()pted.
Fulton County Of ~·l tdal
d .-ib11 t a , t o giv e fact s
ag1dnat atrn exation.
I
ithet fot (It
but hf•VU no t Lalw n • 1t11h~
h
t hh
If i peaket
hav11 lrnett 11t 1M el\ t a ~ t.1uJ
fo1'
,iu it
011011'.l d he ,
1-~imtu ar t.a
110
ill ?\ 1ip 11red tiu1t j:1111
h vu rto ftto.t s a t hand 1 then 1rnld ai ugg ett t hey ,l uE1t 1t ubstit:\J t1
tht! Ci ty Of fi cials oancet n t!d 111ld 1 t
th
m b e t h e d 1:1 bat et e ,
c er t ainl y t hey will look af t ~r At lftn t a 1 1 int eros c a ,
'
.
J?ul ton County Of H1, h lll OA~OT
ru• t1t>1'lsi bl U ty for t:hp sav ,~ I~1ll1dy
au utn t hJ?
H1,r i tiQII Clotl'llll I t I
c Hhens of tl:te llnittcmti>t>r 11tu1l ,ir etl • b ~cHtilfle
are ei ected byt ~i t y bf
At i~~t• re1ldehta
re~i dents out~ i dt the city l Lmlts .
..
~hay
4$ W 11
a mo
br
I>th tar
t·~~teher\~ 1 H111l
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co~nty
�.!1!1 1J 1v1q _JfA.t'..tL.t\1'.!ill!
ANNICXATIOJ~
Senate Bill 101, J!J5L, i!l
H1I
act tu 1H1 tHhlillh C\
m8t:hod for providing garbage tl :I.Bl>OIH11 uystems .Ill t:lrn
unincorporated portion of F'ult 1111 COl.11\tY) to authot1 ~u th~
Commissioners of Fulton Counl·.y tp ca ll an the Oily o.f Atlantn
to furnish facilities for the collection and disposal of
garbage and refuse, the cleaning of streets and roads and related
services in unincorporated areas of said county; to require said
city to furnish said county with an estimate of the cost thereof
and provide such services at costj to prohibit Fulton County from
providing such services except through the City; , , , ,to pro~id a
for defraying the cost of such services by a tax or assessment
on property or property .owners in garbage dispo sal districts,, , 11
The City of Atlanta is required by law to furnish
garbage collection, street cl eaning services, and r elat ed
s ervices, AT COST.
The capital le~ters are ours,
The s tatement,
though, is the law .
Sanitation cos t s would no t be reduced by annexation
enough to make it wor th s harp ening a pencil to figur
No t only
do Sandy Springs residents gC1t two garbage coll ections a we ek,
but Fulton County has now inata lled a service whereby e ight
collection stations have been located near concentrations of
homes in the area.
This is on even better servic e than the City
.. 2 •
..
�')
provides, because area residents do not have to drive around
piles of leaves and trash such as litter the city streets until
sanitation trucks finally make their rounds.
Just a few blocks
in any direction will find the eight cubic yard containers,
which will hold everything from raw garbage to cardboard boxes,
They are located as follows:
Mt. Vernon Highway at -Dupree Drive
Hammond Drive at Glenridge Drive
Spalding Drive at Roberts Drive
Northside Drive at West Garmon Road
Powers Ferry Road at Mt, Paran Road
Sandy Springs Circl e at Johnson. Ferry Road
Roswell Road at Dalrymple Road
Roswell Road at Hightower Trail
These refuse conta iners have been installed out of
necessity in spite of the 1952 Plan of Improvement prohibi tion
on Fulton County's engaging in the collection and disposal of
garbage and ref us e ,
Section ll, Samit
Bill 105, Geor gia laws 1951. 1
states that the authority of Pulton County to ~&t~hlish and
maintain water I s ewer and
Hr" pr aventi.on sys t 12mo :la "her by
r<?pealed, 11
.. ' 3
..
�ANNEXATION :iJ
SEWAGE
The Public Admini s tration Service report states on
page 37,
11
Most of Atlanta's t.i:ea tmcnt plants, which, as not ed
earlier, serve a much larger nroa than just the City, provide
only primary treatment-- which removes only 30-35 percent of
the pollutant material b efore the sewage is discharged back into
streams. ' 1
The "PETITION AND PAY 11 plan is the only way Sandy
Sp'!'ings would ever get s ewer service.
City sewer s ervi co would no t automatic a lly be
ex t ended to a ll homes as a r es ult of annexat ion,
There ar e m1tny
area s within the city limi ts nf Atlunta wh ich do not have sew r
servic e.
New s ewer serv i c e would cos l:, as
per front fo ot.
El
t by law , $3 , 50
There would be a corme ·tion fue of $80 to $120,
T~is means i t would cost approximately $420 to insta ll sewer linus
down the averag e R-2A 120 foot lot.
Fulton county has plans to i mprov e the sewer grid, as
well as do es the City of Atlanta
Springs already on sewers.
witness those homes in Sandy
This was obtained under Fulton County
Government, WITHOUT "PETITION AND PAY' 1 •
•.
�.ANNEXATION 1r4
INCREASED REPRESENTATION
City of Atlanta officials have mad e much of the fact
that Sandy Springs area resid ent s could expect to be a new ninth
ward, and have two Aldermen olecl ed to represent them.
The
subject tha t no one within th e Ci ty of Atlanta has brought up is
contained on page 3114, Georr; ia Laws 1951, in the so-called Plan
of tmprovement.
It reads as follows:
'~he mayor and general council shall have power to make
change s in ward lines whe never it is deemed advisable
to contract or ext end th em for the benefit of the
citi z ens thereof, provilled that the ward line s, when
rearranged, shall not b l! more than nine wards."
The day aft er e l t!Cti on of Aldermen from the n ew nin t h
war d, the City of Atl a nt a 's mayor and general council could,
BY LAW, do away with exclusiv e representation fr om .the Sandy
Springs ar ea .
ANNEXATION #5
PROPERTY
TAX
The lat est mailing f rom the Atlanta Team fo r Tomor row
repeats the old stat ement " taxes would be hi gher, but t he increase
would be largely offset . . . . "
and give s an exampl e of a tax
increase of $1 00 . 12 on an e xisting $43,000 home in t he area.
- 5 -
•.
Now,
�wha t this i .. ~est bit of fi guring DOESN'T DO is to r epeat the
stat ement made in the ir March 14th release, and we quote,
"Furthermor e , Buckhead r esidents found that property values
wi t h in th ~ city went up a ut oma tically (afte r annexation).
We
s a y thi s st a t ement prob a bly i s true , b ec a us e only by re-va luing
(or re-ass e ssing , if yo u wi l l'.) a hous e can taxes b e drastically
incr ea sed.
We ar e sur e t ha t s uch increase will b e just a s
/I UTOMATIC for r es id en ts of Sandy Spr i ngs, should the ar ea b e
a nnexed, as it wa s for Buckhe11d.
In addition, ev e r y se t of f i gur e s we 've seen k eeps
DEDUCTING f or fir e t axe s, garlrn ge s er vi ces , etc .
We l l, you c an
b Lllev e it or not, but tha t s ame amuun t of nwncy is s till going
out PLUS th a t little incr e ase t he y j us t h app en to me n tion.
Prop er ty t ax e s a r 8 a ss es s ed , by the way , pur s uant
t o t he 195 2 P l a n of Imp r ov ement , by a join t Ci ty - Fu lton County
boa rd .
"Op e r a tions a r e conducted at and from t h e Fulton County
Administration Building .
The Tax Asses s men t Department i s
h eaded by a thr ee -memb e r At l a nta-Fulton County Jo int Boa rd of
Ass e ss o r s . .. . Exc ept fo r its a ppo i n t men t, the Joi n t Board has
l itt l e r e s pons ibility t o e ither t h e Ci ty or Coun t y Gov ernment"*


From the Public Administra tion Servic e Report.


AND DI D YOU KNOW FULTON COUNTY COLLECTS ATLANTA'S
CITY TAXES FOR THEM?
Ch e ck the Plan of Improv ement ,
- 6 -
The l aw ,
�r e quir es Fu lton County no t on l y to collect Atlanta's taxes, but
t o p r epar e t ax bills a nd pr ov i de offic e spac e , as we ll.
ANNEXATION #6
FI RE PROTECT ION
Muc h ha s b e en ma de of the f a ct that th e City of
Atlanta f urn i s hes f ir e protecti on to Fulton County r e sid ents of
the uninc o rpo ra t ed ar ea .

Unde r t he 1952 Plan of Improvement th e
Fu lton Coun t y Commi ss i oner s wer e forb i dden BY LAW to mainta i n
eith er a f i re d epa r t men t or f ur ni s h f i re pr ev ention facili t i e s
ex c ept UNDER CONTRACT WI TH THE CITY OF ATLANTA, or anothe r
muni c ip a l ity .
Senat e Bill No . 105 of the p l an of I mpr ov emen t was
writt en " to au t hori ze the c ommissioner s of said c ounty to ent e r
in t o c ontract s with one or mor e municipa l it i e s ther e i n f or a
f i r e p rev entio n sy s t em in any unincorporated area of s aid county
or to c all on t he Ci ty of At lant a t o f urnis h t he same at ACTUAL
COS T a s long as paymen t is ma de the r e for;
t o prohib it
Fulton County from ma in ta ining fir e prev ent i on syst ems .... ' '
So you s e e , t he City only can charge Fulton County
resi d en t s of t he Uni ncorp orat ed ar ea for the ACTUAL COS T of fire
protec ti on, and the County CANNOT hav e a f ir e department .
Sinc e
Sandy Spri ngs i s dev elop i ng a business area of i ts own, these
business e s should be a bl e t o cont ribu te t o low ering t he cos t of
- 7 -
�fi re p r o t e c t i o n t o ar ea r e s ident s .
At l a nt a ma i ntain s t ha t its
d owntown bus i n e ss e s h e l p d ef ray the co s t of fire ins u ranc e fo r
homeowner s .
We main t ai n t h is wou l d be true in t he Sandy
Springs a r e a, wi thou t incur r i ng a n indebtedne ss o f a n op e ration
whi c h is i neff i c i en t and poor l y organiz e d , a nd has li t tle
a ttr a c t i o n fo r qualif i ed pers onne l .
The Survey Rep o rt of t h e P ubl i c Administration
Service says abo u t At lanta ' s fire prote ction, " Man n ing o f the
d2p ar t ment i s s ho r t o f Amer i ca n Ins u ranc e As so c iation standards , ..
Qua li fie d r e c r ui t s are inc reasingly hard to a ttract and
resi g nations are increasing at an alarming r ate ".
In add i tion , t he c omment was ma d e in t h is report,
" Its lowest rating (Atl an ta ' s) i n the mo st rec en t revi ew b y t he
Board (in October, 1964) was in fire prevention . "
To get down to the hard facts o f fire protection -Sandy Springs will nev e r get any more fi r e protection than Sandy
Springs c an pay for .
Atlanta reportedly c annot keep enough men
o n the job now to fun ction efficien tly .
Buildings ove r two stori es in height were built
without conforming to zoning in exist ence when the Sandy Spring s
fire classification was obtained .
Inadequat e fire protection is
the fault of the joint city-county zoning board, which allowed
structur e s not prov ided for in the fire prev ention program.
- 8 -
We
�~~ i i:t a in ·h ~s ~ bu i l d i n g s shoul d pay an i n c reased f i re tax to
provi rie for s pec ia l pr o t e ction NEEDED BY THEM b e c aus e the y were


~t


in appar ent violation o f e xisting s pecific ati ons .
POLICING
Und e r t he 1952 Pl a n of I mp r ovement, the unin c orpora t e d
s2cti0,.s of F ulto n Co u nty MUST r e c e ive p ol i c e protection from t h e
Ci-cy of At lan ta .
In Sa ndy Spr i ng s , b e c a us e of t he limi t e d p opulation,
the police have b e en d o ing a mo r e t h a n a d e qua te job .
b ec1 saf2 going t o s h o pp ing c e n ter s .
within the City o f At l an t a is s
man per thousand po~ulation
Wome n h av e
The incide nc e of r a p e a l o ne
hi g h t h a t it a pp e ars the ir 1 . 5
ee <ls to be 2 . 5 me n pe r thous a nd ,
whil 2 the 1 per thousand i n the Sandy Spr ing s area s eems to b e
esta'.)lishing a fi ne re cord for prev ent io n o f c rime o f thi s t ype .
Theft and ho usebreak ing , and the mor e seriou s c rime s
of vi lence and murd er , hav e almost seeme d to c onf ine th emse l v es
to che Ci · y l imits .
If handl i n g offe nses i n the u ninco r p orat e d area
through the Fulton County Criminal Cour t continu es to hol d crime
at cne pecty low level now maintained i n Sa n dy Sprin gs , we d o not
f_e: 1t would be wi se to s wap fon City jus t ic e s , city ordi nanc es
of >t143.215.248.55ca, and city c rime .
- 9 -
�ANNEXATION ,rJ
PAVING AND L IGHT S
S t r e e t s , s idewa l k s , s t ree t ligh ts and tr a ffic li g h ts
a lmo s t a ll c ome und e r th e " PET ITION AND PAY" p l a n .
Ex c e ption
p r o b a b l y i s in t he t r affi c l i g l1t ar e a , and of th e e i g ht ligh ts
r e connnend e d a s b e ing n eed e d , J, u lt o n County a lr e ady has tak e n
no t e .
P l a n s a lr eady a r e und e r way fo r installation of some of
th ese li g hts .
The r e c ommended stree t lig hts d e finit e ly will b e on
a pet iti o n b a s i s .
At lanta c o u l d find o n l y THREE MAJOR STREETS I N SANDY
SPRINGS BELOW STA11DARD .
We say t his is r emark a ble i n a n a r ea
r o u g hly on e - th i r d the s i ~e of t he City o f Atlant a .
Ext e ns i on of
th e s e fi g ur e s SHOULD MEAN th ~ t At lan t a only ha s nine Stlb -st andard
ma jor str ee ts .
Is tha t so ?
By th e way -- paving c ome s und e r the
" PETITION AND PAY " pl a n in t h e . Ci t y o f P. tlant a .
To ge t a st r ee t pav e d in fro nt o f th e aver age R- 2A
lot wou l d c ost THE HOMEOWNER b e twe n $ 7 26 and $900, s h ou l d h e liv e
If he wa nts a s idewal k , it will c os t about $192 mor e .
in Atlanta .
"P ETIT I ON AND PAY" aga in, exc e pt whe re inc rease s in publ ic safety
n e e ds a ll ow the c ity to l ay a sid ewalk witho ut p e tition and
c har ge own e rs o n a front - foo t b a si s .
ANNEXATION #9
INCOME TAXES
City taxe s are d e d uc t ib l e items on income tax es.
- 10 -
�\ nyone who has ev e r figured a n income t ax knows just
how muc h credit you will ge t on " Income Taxes " for the amo u nt of
city t axes paid .
And you s till have to pay th e city taxes!
Will th e deduc t i on you ge t balanc e the t ax y ou wi l l
e v e r has y e t !
have to pay?
Also , we point out deduction d oes
not apply i f short form return is u sed ; only when long form 1040
is us ed, lis t ing all d e ductions, would these taxe s be dedu c tible.
ANNEXATION 1/:10
SCHOOLS
Atlanta schools have nothing to o ffe r c hildr en
attending Fulton County schools .
Altho u g h Atlanta schools alleged l y have received
preferential tr ea tme nt from the Joint Fulton County-City of
Atlanta t ax assessment bo a rd, th e Fulton County schools have more
than measured up .
In fact, Dr. John Letson admitted that there
was substantially no difference in the two systems.
Dr. Paul West
o f Fulton County added that f or years th e two systems · had been
9pera ting under a coordinat ing board.
The city schools offer free kindergartens.
It is
in tere sting to note tha t the State of Ge orgia is now considering
a plan to add-free kind e r ga rt ens to all state schools.
Fulton County and Atlanta both have a progr am for
mentally and physically handicapped children.
- 11 -
The tuition is FREE
�for both .
, ev e r, i n th e cas e of •u l ton County , i f the c h i ldren
l i ve too far from th e scho ol, they are TR./1.NSPORTED .
Needless t o
say , t h i s is a real help to a family wh ic h alrea dy ha s t he ex tr a
burde n of a handicapp ed child.
Fu l t on County h as school psyc h olo g i s ts a nd
p s; chomet ri sts .
It pionee r e d specia li st s i n suc h a r e as as
c u r r iculum development and re a ding .
Fulton County operate s a j oi n t voc a tio n al tr a i n i ng
program with the Ci ty of Atlanta .
If bus servic e is lost , Atlanta Trans i t Company HAS
NOT agre e d to furn i sh transportation at t e n c ents a r i d e .
ii
And
-~ did, it would only take some $57,000 a year t o t r ansport
those childr en now b e i ng transport e d free .
Try dividing this
among th e famil i e s of Sandy Spring s, and see how mu c h this NEW ,
NON - DEDUCTIBLE (on your income tax) "TRANSPO TATION TAX " would
add to the cost o f going into the Ci ty o f Atlanta.
Since Judge Wood's decision that city schools and '
county schools must have their tax structure equalized, for the
·first time in 1967 Fulton County Schools will have adequate funds.
At l a nt a schools will not .
Dr . John Letson says he
n e eds 64 MILLION DOLLARS to have ad e qua te f u nds.
He can borrow
only 21.5 million , b e c ause , to put it quite simply, the property
he has just won't t ake any big ge r firs t mort gage ( s chool tax
- 12 -
�as se ssment . ,
The amount of money. that can be borrowed is
limited by the tax b a se ( amoun t of property) by t he State
Leg islature .
SO, I STEAD OF FULTON COUNTY SCHOOLS BEING IN DIRE
NEED, IT IS I N
EALITY THE CITY OF AT
JTA SCHOOLS , in · spite of
larger tax assessments , and no homestead exemption deductions,
that are I r DIRE NEED O
FUNDS .
Fulton County schools have NO CHILD EN ON DOUBLE
SESSION -- Atlanta ha s more t han T
n
E THOUSAND .
Just in p as sing , City and County officials alike are
OT agreed that the eve nt ua l
er ge r of the two s y stems will take
pl 2c e .
- 13 -
�7
Tucker Wayne & Company
Sandy Springs Annexation
Mailing Piece on Zoning
CLIENT:
PRODUCT:
CAMPAIGN:
Job 1fa966
4/25/66 SM/Y
(cover)
GET THE FACTS ON
GROWTH Al'l'D ZONING
(inside)
FACT:
The resul ts of poor zoning in Sandy Springs are already
obvious on Roswell Road.
•- ~;;;:w.! :w :;J.=ef...... i ~'l:,RH a•2t·i*:¥
~---'"--L.--&,-t<t.¥&i~ ' a - t ~ S tricter zoning laws
. · ~-:-~ ~ i fl.£.~ Thes e classifications would provide
- ~ for cont rol o
ev e lopment o f apar t ments and commercial
centers along major thoroughfares at appropriate intervals
instead of the present continous strip commercial development.
FACT:
I f Sa ndy Springs j oins Atl a nta i t will b ecome part of the
pla n fo r growt h now und er way in the city a plan which
takes the f ollowing into consideration:
0
f u t ur e l a nd needs and thei r location;
d esignat ion of ma jor thoroughfa r es ;
need f or community fa ciliti es such as parks,
schools , l i brar i es ;
pr ogramming o f t h ese impr ovement s a nd t heir sourc es
of funds .
FACT:
Sandy Springs is now a "low-densit~ single-family" communi ty
and this kind of development would continue. if it became part
of the ci t y . Zoning designations 1and busines s licenses approved
by the County before January 1, 1967 would be honored b y the
city. Business licenses now in effect would come up for renewal
in the usual wa y , at the us ual time .
FACT:
In general, Atlanta zoning closely resembles county zoning.
However, city zoning is more restrictive, and also includes
provision for the following new classifications:
�Tucker Wayne & Company
-2-
4/25/66
townhouse units for individual unit sale;
low-density, high-standard apartment developments;
office and institutional development with selected
~e~ai l §~Yet~~ gft~ @h.e~~.
These restricted classifications encourage high
development standards, provide for reasonable
use of certain property, and at the same time
allow only the best community development.













DO YOU HAVE AN INVES'1MENT IN HCME OR
BUSINESS PROPERTY IN SANDY SPRINGS?
IF SO, PROTECT YOUR INVES1MENT AGAINST
LAX OR UNWIS E ZONING LAWS.
VOTE YES MAY 11
SM./Y

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