Box 9, Folder 7, Complete Folder

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Box 9, Folder 7, Complete Folder

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cc : M r . Charles L . Dav i s
M r . Forrest Gee
Mr . Ge orge Berry
June "'O. 1969
Mr. Sam William , Dir cto;r .
Atl nta Urb
Corps
Municipal Audito r i um
Atlanta, Georgl 30303
D
r Sam.
Enclosed i Clty of .AUanta. g .ner l fund ch c:k num.ber 6056 in the mount
of SO. 00 for th purp<>
of funding p tty cash pro-c dur for the Urb .
'
Th a funds are to be used only for tho• misc Uaneo
r · qui~m .nt for
which it ould not be pr ttical or pas ibl to i ~ th r gut r pureha e
r qU! ts or miscellaneou r quisition to th Pu.rch lug Ag nt. Th
xp ndituzes from t he proc
null moun.t •
d
of th
p tty c sh fund ma t b
for rol tiv ly
E v ry ll'P nditur • withou.t x.c:c,,ption, i t o b sub to.nil t d ith aom
invoic , bill, ot memox- da cont in.ill& n --.---plan tion a to
t
is
m purcha.• d. P rio ic ly, a th fund n re depl tion~ you •hould
acoumwat th a writton 1: c:orde nd tt ch th m to a misc
r qui ition writt n fo_r an amount auffident to bring th to
to total oI $50. 00. Y
should e rg
ppropriate
ne
cc::ount
for th amouo.ts p d out. r nt 1. r inUng; uppU • tc . Thie mi c 11 1l! OUS
re u itlon,
ong with th upp rtin bW and uwoie s , hould b fo
rd d
to thi9 office in th uaual
nn r .
ears com.pl ti , you should mak a final r pol't
tty
d , i-•tu.rning to th1 olllc
-, cord f · th .n ~ m in.in
bill
ith th ca h bal nc of th fund . T
re lnt..n p d bilb along ith
al ce •h uld to al $50. 00.
A, the proj ct
ea h f
ta • 1d .nt t. l •truct you :
• lf ny fuflh r clarlil tl
erry.
inc !' ly yo
t
ct
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�l
p
l
Mr. Ri.cb&l-d N.
Georgi T ch Box
Atlanta,
De
R1 h :
Uli
orgia.
r
34832
�Jun 23,
Thi
to confinn your cq,,1~rmaxrt d'\U'i ·
. eo:z:p part...t
intern
CQ.W::a.·
1
d o~ $2,0.oo .•
Atlanta
on
1969
u
�e,
0 ~ !)I
J/4~A
)ULA/~
143.215.248.55r/~
~
7 - 1-6 7
/
�' 9, 1969
July
I
I
I,

I
Mra. Joanna Mctteevat'
Room 808
101 Marietta Street , NW
Atlanta, Georgia 10,01
Der Mrs. McRaever:
As agreed to in our eonv raation of this morning, I am torwarding to
you:
l.
A contract and one copy that will constitute the
agr mant •• reached b tw en Mr. Harold Barrett, ·
E. O. A. 1 ancl Mr. Dave Whe 1 n, Urban Corpe , reg rd• ing E.O.A. payment for two intoma at the r ate of
$880 acb.
2.
A contract and one copy that will constitute the
agre
nt as reached betw n the foremontioned
partiee reg rding E.O.A. p yment for two interns
at the rat of $250 acb.
If you will please have omeone uthorized to contract for E.O.A.
and retum the four documents it will b appreclat d.
ign
B nk dr fta eboutd b mad pay ble to the City of Atlanta , Atlanta Ur~an
Corps.
I thank you f.n anticipation of your coop
Sincerely,
lnmond L. Deent Jr.
Ptnanei 1 Director
ILD:pch
Enclo ure
...,.
~<'::_ . .:-. .. __
---
1."
tion in this matter.
,•

�Mr. Sam William~ , Director
Atlanta Urban Corps
Municipal Auditorium
Atlan a, Georgia
30303
Dear Sam:
ntJ mk""
Enclosed is 6ity of Atlanta
i::,oS'b
general fund chec~~ in the
amount of $1-·o.oo for the purpcse of fundinP:" a petty cash
procedure for the Urban Corp~ Project ,
These funds are to be used on'J,y for those misce l laneous
requirements for wh i ch it would not be practir.al or nossible
to issue the re gular purchase requests or miscellaneous
requisitio ns to the Purchasing Age nt.
The expen0i tures
mu.s+-
from t he proceeds of the petty cash f un d sk
3~ be r or
relatively small amounts.
Every e xpe nd iture, without exception, is to be
s ub s tantiat ed wi th s oma invoice, bill, or memora r, da
-Mnitt 9~ 1?e co1d c ontaining an a~dequate expl anation a s
to what is being purchased .
Period ically, as the fund
ne a rs de pletion, y ou should accumulate these written
re c ords a nd a t~ ach them to a miscellaneous requisition
written for an amount sufficient to bring the to t al
f un d ba ck t o a t otal of
t 5o.oo.
You should ch arge the
a ppropr i a t e expe nse a ccount f or the amounts pa i d out ,
rental, printing , atKX supplies, etd.
This miscellaneous
r equ is i tion, a long with the supp or ting bills ~nd i n vo i ces ,
should be f or warded t o th i s oftf i ce in the usualy ~anner.
cj.-\~('+
biQc_0
I trust this ~nformati on i s sufficient to instruct yo ~
ont the proper operat i on of t he petty cash fund.
If any
further claD'ification is needed 9 please conta ,~t me or
George Berry.
CS : GLD, Forrest Gee, G aarrv
DS
�Ai the project nears completion. you should make
a final report on the petty ca sh fund, returning to
then
this office a record of all/remai ning paid bills
alon g with the
~KKK
cash balance of the fund.
These
remaining paid bills along with the cash balance
should total $50.00.
�NATIONAL
DEVELOPMENT
OFFICE
2 50 BROADWA Y
NEW YO RK , N . Y , 10007
The effectiveness of an Urban Gorps depends in large part upon
the perceptions of the participating students themselves.
During the
summer of 1968, 20 students from Sarah Lawrence College took part
in New York City's Urban Corps, and one of them, Teresa Baker, wrote
this article
on their experiences with the city.
Miss Baker had a bird's-
eye view of the entire program from her internship position in the Urban
Corps program development office.
A native of Denver, Colorado, Miss Baker received her .B. A.
from Sarah Lawrence College in June, 1969.
Miss Baker, 21, was editor of her college newspaper, an editorial
assistant in the Sarah Lawrence Office of Publications and Publicity, and
a tutor in the Upward Bound Program.
She will be attending the Columbia Unive rsity School of Journalism
i n September , 1969.
Additio n a l copie s of this re print are ava ilable u pon r e que st.
�NATIONAL
N
DEVELOPMENT
O·FFICE
cop
Document Number 5A
Federal Regulations
Pertaining To The
College Work-Study Program
with
Analysis and Finding List
May, 1969
�Document Number 5 A:
CWSP Regulations
This is the fifth of a series of studies on the concept, development and
operation of an Urban Corps student urban involvement program prepared by the Urban Corps National Development Office under a grant
from the Ford Foundation.
Additional copies of this report and fur t her information concerning Urban
Corps programs may be obtained by writing:
Micha el B. Goldstein
Director
Urban Corps National Development Office
250 Broadway
New York, New York 10007
Telephone : (212)
964-5552
The reader is urged to use thes e regulations in conjunction with the College
Work-Study Program Manual, published by the U.S. Office of Education,
and the Urban Corps National Deve lopment Office report on Legal Considerations (Document No . 5). The CWSP Manual may b e obtained from the
Colle g e W ork - Study P rog ram Bra n c h, Bur eau of Higher Educati on, U . S.
Office of Education, Washington, D. C. 20202.
�1
The College Work-Study Program was established under the provisions of the Economic Opportunity Act of 1964 and was subsequently incorporated into the Higher Education Act of 1965.
actments provided the basic
11
These legislative en-
skeleton 11 of CWSP; the Commissioner of
Education was empowered to promulgate regulations governing the specific
use of CWSP funds.
Although draft CWSP regulations were developed and distributed
as early as November of 1964, the College Work-Study Program did not,
until the promulgation of the attached Regulations, operate under legally
binding regulations.
The guidelines for the adininistration of CWSP, codi-
fied in the 1968 College Work-Study Program Manual, are only interpretations of the legislative mandate, and not, in accordance with the Federal
Administrative Procedure Act, legally enforceable.
However, since each
institution is required by statute to enter into a formal agreement with
the Office of Education, for the administration of its CWSP prog ram, the
effects of this lack of
11
legal 11 regulations has been largely obviated.
As the utilization of CWSP b ecame more extensive, and the uses
themselves more s ophisticat ed, the need for a concise set of formal regulations became apparent.
The new Regulations not only complete the legal
base for the administration of CWSP programs, but also provide for several substantive changes, additions and clarifications.
�2
Perhaps the most significant element of the new Regulations is
the increased emphasis on the nature of the work- study assignment, and
the involvement of participating students in "worthwhile job opportunities
for qualified students in employment for the institution itself or for public
or private non-profit organizations, especially those engaged in health,
education, welfare and related public service activities.
emphasis added).
11
(Seotionl75. l(b)(4);
.
One of the criteria for the approval of CWSP grants
has now similarly been specifically keyed to public service activities
(Sectionl75.14 (c) ).
The new Regulations define in detail what is meant by an area
vocational school and establish student eligibility requirements 11 (Section
175. 2 (c) and 175. 5 (b) ).
These institutions became eligible for parti-
cipation in CWSP under the 1968 Higher Education Amendments.
A 120-
day annual limit is imposed on the duration of a cooperative education
program for funding under CWSP (Section 175. 2 (p) ) and definitions and
limitations are provided for the full-time employment of students during
"non-r egular pe riods of enrollment" (e.g. summer school; S e ctions
175.2 (q) , 175 .2 (r ) and 175.6(b) ).
Work pe rformed for the institution itself is now required, under
the new Regulations, to "result in an expansion or broadening of the in stitution's student employment programs" (Section 175. 4 (b) ).
This is
considerably stronger than the previous "maintenance of effort" requirement.
The nature of off-campus work is also more clearly defined, in-
eluding a concise definition (and proscription) of "political involvement "
(Sections 175. 4 (c) and 175. 4 (d) ).
�3
The new Regulations set forth the minimum permissible rates
of pay for participating students and impose as an upper limit such hourly
rate as the Commissioner of Education establishes
(Section 175 . 8 (b)
and 175. 9).
The right of an institut ion to c ~:mtract with an outside agency or
organization to administer the ministerial functions of its CWSP program
is recognized, with the ex plicit proviso that the institution remains respons i ble for the proper execution of the program, and that it may not • under
any circumstances, delega te the a uthority to determine the eligibility of
its students to receive CWSP assistance. (Section 175.16 (a) (2) ).
This
provi sion sanctions the usual Urban Corps arrangement, wher e the m uni cipality (or ot h er a gency a dmi niste r ing t h e Ur b a n Corps) s erve s as pay master a n d p r ov ides the r equisi t e on - going supervision and control of
the w o rk p e rformed .
A copy of t h e new CWSP Regulations is included in this document.
Also included is a fin ding list, c r oss -indexing t h e new Regulations with
the comparable pr ovisions o f the 1968 CWSP Manual.
�4
Finding List
This index cross-references the new CWSP Regulations with the
1968 CWSP Manual. An asterisk(*) denotes a substantive change enacted
by the Regulations; a # indicates new material added by the Regulations,
and n/c indicates no comparable provision in the CWSP Manual. Numbers
refer to Regulation and Manual sections.
Regs.
Manual
175. 5
175.1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102*
175. 2
...........• 101
. • . . . . . . . . . . 606
...•.•..•.. . #
. . . . . . . . . . . . 103
. . . . . . . . . . . . 511 (B)
(£) ••...•....• · 201 (A)
(g) . . . . . . . . . . . . 401 (C)
(h) ........•.. , 203 (B)
(i) . . . . . . . . . . . . 302 (C), 303, 304
(j) .•...•..... · 302 (C)
(k) . . . . . . . . . . . . 302 (B)
(a)
(b)
( c)
(d)
(e)
(1) ............ 201
(m).•.......... 201
(n) . . . . . . . . . . . . 307 ,
(o) • .....•. . ... 302
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)
••...... 302
........ #
..•.•..• 401-407
•....... 306
(e) .....•. . 311
(£) .••••.•. 401 (D)
175. 6
(a) .•. • .... 509
(b) ......•• 510*
(c) ........ 510
"
175. 7
(a) ......•. 603, 606
(b) ....•.•. 708
(A)
(C)
308
175.8
(a) . . •...•. 603*
(b) ........ 503, 710, 507*
(D)
(p) • · · · · · · · • · · · 305 (B)-(E) ),'<
(q)
(r)
(s)
(t)
(u )
Manual
Regs.
............ #
............ #
.. . ... . . . ... 517 (A)
. . .. . .. . ... . 518 (B)
... . ... , ... . n / c
175.9 .........•.. 505 ·
175.10 ........... 604
175.11 ... . ....... 602
175.12 ....... ... . 104
175 . 3
(D)
(a) . ... . ... . ... 203
(b ) .. .. .. . .. . · . 203
(c) .. . . . . ... . .. 70 5
175. 4 . . ..•.. . · . ·• · · · . 10 2
(a ) (1) (i ) . . ... . . 519 (A )
(ii) .. . .. , 519 (C)
(2 ) (i) . . . . . . 519 (D)
(ii) . ..... 519 (B )
(b) . •... .. •... . 602 *
(c ) (1) . •. •. . . . . 517
(B ) *
(2 ) ... . ..... 517
{d ) (1) ..•... .. . 519
(2) •. . .....• 519
(3) ... . .•.. , 517
(C ), 517 (D )
(D)
(D)
(B )*
175 . 13 (a) .• ...••• 202
(b) . ... .. . • 2 01 (D )
175 .14 ..... . ... . .. 2 02 (B)*
175.15 (a) . ...... . 702
(b) .•. .• . . . 704, 705
(c ) . . .. . ... n/c
175.16 (a) (l) . . . . . 801
(2 ) ..... #
(3) . ..•• 717
(b) . .. .•... 801 et. seq.
(c ) .. . .. . .. 901 et. seq.
175. 17 .. .. ...... .. n/ c
�ATLANTA SERVICE-LEARNING CONFERENCE
Room B-70 275 Peachtree Street
Atlanta, Georgia 30303
Dear Conference Participant:
Just a reminder! Preparations for the Atlanta Service-Learning Conference
opening meeting at the White House Motor Inn in Atlanta from June 30 to
July 1 are being finalized. Response, thus far, has been gratifying both
by the intended participants and by national and local media.
Due to the support of participating organizations it has become possible to
lower the r egistration fee to $15.00 for all participants. Thi s fee covers
the cost of the three meals included in the program. For those who cannot
attend all three meals, further adjustment will be possible. If you need
lodging, reservations at the White House Motor Inn should be made by you
personally.
Several areas of the conference have been integrated enabli ng us to conclude
aft er the lunch eon on Tuesday, July 1. Thi s earlier conclusion wi ll f a c i litate the departure of those participants who wish to leave in the early
after noon.
We hope t hat these changes will be conduc ive to your attendance at the
confer ence . We l ook f orward t o see ing you t here .
Conference Steering Committ ee
The City of Atla nta
The Atlanta Ur ba n Corps
Economic Opportunity At l a nta
The College s and Universities of At l a nta
Department of Health, Educat i on and Wel f are
The Southern Regiona l Education Board
Volunteers in Service t o Amer i ca
The Peace Corps
�ATLANTA URBAN CORPS
30 Courtland Street, N. E.
Atlanta, Georgia 30303
June 20, 1969
Urban Corps Interns, Supervisors and Friends:
The Urban Corps and several aervice organizations such as the
Peace Corps, VISTA, and the Southern Regional Education Board are
sponsoring a National Conference o~ service••learning in Atlanta June
30 - July 1, 1969. The initial Conference will explore the servicelearning experience of existing volunteer and service programs and
plan a metropolitan model for Atlanta involving area colleges, local
agencies, and foundations.
A series of follow··through meetings will be held during the sunmer
to examine specific aspects of s~~vice~learning programs such as finance,
college curriculum revision and educational aspects of service.
All Urban Corps interns will attend the first day's session June 30,
with registration starting at 8:30 a.m., et the White House Motor Inn, 70
Houston Street, N. E. Interns should notify their supervisors in advance
about their planned absence from work that day. We especially would like
intern supervisors to attend. Hopefully some interns and supervisors
will be able to attend the Tuesday Meeting as well .
During the afternoon session e.11 interns will meet with Urban Corps
evaluation staff members for ad<litionla information about the internship.
Therefore attendance is very crucial.
Speakers for the Conference include Atlanta's Mayor, Student President
at Clark College, Georgia Tech's President , Pea~e Corps and VISTA Regional
Directors, and Whi t e House Aide s o
We look forward to seeing you June 30.
Sincerely ,
"(. ·- -
(
c)c~H { r- .
I
I. i ( ' .
Luc:~_..A c,u"·\A_
SAM A. WILLIAMS
Director
Atlanta Urban Corps
SAW:blu
�-
I
A PROPOSAL FOR MODEL SCHOOLS
A MEMO SUBMITTED TO RICHARD NIXON
._.,:
~·-
FROM SAM WILLIAMS
JOHN CAMPBELL
FERRELL PAGE
STUDENT COALITION
WILLARD HOTEL
UNITED CITIZENS FOR NIXON-AGNEW
CHARLES RHYNNE, NATIONAL CHAIRMAN
NOVEMBER 5, 1968
..
�Before WHY NOT ( o:- the"model schools) proposal can be presented as legislation
the fol lmving points need to be researched in more depth .





1.
The cost of carrying out WHY NOT in appro;dmately 20 schools in
the initial year .
2.
The duration of the grants and how they might be renewed,
3.
The proposal refined and organized into booklet form.
4.
A schedule of deadlines for the participating groupJ planning
and implementation of programs, _,__
5,
Approx imately 20 schools representing the var i ety of exisring
i nstitutions must be screen ed and briefed on the proposal;
Pre-requisite s for qualification wo~ld be a cooperative administration very intereste d in playing a larger rol e in the urba n
c ommunity.
~.
The d r afting of a major Pre sid e ntial speech to introduce the
idea of WHY NOT.
7.
The possibl e us e of the surroga te candidates as Pre s ide ntial
visito r s and guests at participating colleges.
8.
The adoption of a name, ;pr the plan . WHY NOT conve ys the
challenging.,,. incentive<.!;-daring of involved youth on the campus
today. WHY NOT!
.
[
I
.
�"Colleges whose conr.ept of education stops at the walls of
ivy give little but the option of dropout to students seeking participation in the real world, In contrast, a college
that combines the opportunity for off-campus service
experiences with the opportunity for on-campus acad e mic reflection on the e xpe ri e nc e s, c a n en g ender in their students a
thirst fo r educational involve me nt complementary to their
thil'.'st for societal involvemento" 1
Proposal for a "MODEL SCHOOLS" prog ram in th e Nixon Administration to develop
and e:;cpand s e nzi!ce progr a ms involving young pe-ople o
A DIRECT ION
Mr. Ni xon in his sp ee ch "Toda y 's Youth:
.
,
The Gr ea t Ge neration" said:
"Our future leadei~ship must provide our young people with a
cause to be for; a commitment to the riiht to be unique;
a dedication to social responsibility on a person - to-person
basis,
"We are not talking here about a way to work off youthful
enthusiasm; we are talking about a wa y to work in a sense
of id e alism and meanir:ig that will gr ow throughout a pe rson's
life,
"There are 7 million college students todayo The unive rsiti e s
th e y attend are often clos e to and some tim e s contribute to,
urba n probl e mso We have s een how go ve rnment c an make use of
acad e mic facilities as "think tanks" to mo ve in on difficult
projectso Every univer s ity must become a "think tank" foi:its local community.
"In that wa y .stud ents will add re alism to their education, as
th e y bring need ed services to th e ir communities,
"Some of this is we ll und e r way in pion e e r ing colle ges · across
the country; but now it should become a way of colleg e life.
"Th e idea of br i n 6 ing th e resourc e s of youthfJl en e r gy to bear
on urba n pr oblem:i is becinning to t a k e r oot; what i s :1 eed ed now
is a na tional c ommitme nt to provid e inc e ntive a nd fin a ncin g to
th e grea t cha ll e nge fa c in g this g e ne rati on of Ame ric a ns . "
This p ropos al ou t lin e s ho w this na ti ona l commi tm e nt mi ght be start ed to be conc entrated initi a ll y a t th e educ a tion c e n ters , but g ran ts t o be
a va il a bl e to s ta t es , citi es , a nd institu t ion s whose p r oj e cts fit th e p r oposa l's guid e lin e s~
To ma r shal l th e na tiona l r es ou r ce s o f ou r youn g peop l e to conf ront ou r
s oc i a l prob l ems i n ge nera l , a nd th e u r ban p r obl ems i n par ticul ar, th e Ni xon
Ad min i st ~ation mus t be aware o f t he magn itud ~ of w~Jck that can be d one t hrough
vol un tee r st udent groups and i nd ividua l s pr i med by f ed era l f unds i n a systemat ic
a pproac h o
Th e "Mode l Schoo l s " p r ogram a t tempts t o a chi eve s e ve r-a l d i stinct r e sults:
1.
Bring additional education resou r ces to bear on social
pro bl ems o
2o
Prov id e a const ructi ve outlet f or th e d issat i sfaction many
s tudents f ee l with society by giving them t he oppo rtu nity
to develop and eKpand st ud ent resourc es in meaningful programs o f soc~~l va lueo
3.
Provid,, a wort hwhile supplement t o the forma 1 education
of th e unive rsi t y,
1oon.:ild J, Eberly, " Servi l e Exirit--i e ncc an d Educnri.onal GrnwLh, 11 Ed..1cational
f143.215.248.55rJ, Sprinp, ]968.
.
�~iAT STUD ENTS ARE NOW D~ING
Th e importa nce of volunt eer communit y service by students can no t be overemphasized. On e individua l helping another who is in n ee d is on e of the basic
tenets which c a n build a r evitali ze d society in our country, n ot only in the
communiti es surrounding our nation's coll eges and univ ers iti es, but in every
com~~ni ty. The suppressed radi c a li sm of yo u th cries out f or p rog r ams wh ich c an
harn ess th e ir e n ergi e s fo r social b etterme nt and wh ich rely h eavi ly on th e
principle of volun teer is m,
Many groups already e x ist th at us e stud ~ t volunteers in basic educat ion a l
(tutoring, remedial r eadi n g ), community act ion (r ecrea tion a l programs , organization of local n ews l et t ers ), and r e habilita tive ( work in mental ho sp itals,
prison s ) activities.
But many ca mp us es l ack . eve n the basic organizational
s tr uctu re , and often where it d oes exis t it suffers from a ge n era l absence of
coord ination, organi z at i on, exper i enced guidance and sufficient fu11ding.
Often the scope of a school's involveme n t in it s neighboring area d epe nd s too
much on th e e n erg i es and ti me of too f ew memb e rs o f th e univers it y com:nunity,
Ma ny c reat ive and helpful communit y programs do exist:
�Me mph is h~s a Volu nteer Service Bureau that hand l e s the placemen t of
workers in over 200 positions in 50 non -profit agencies,
Student s work with the Memphis Area Proj e ct-Sou t h which sponsors
clothe s closets to provide f am ilie s with essential clothing whe n
dis a ster hits. MAPS also over s ee s "planned parenthood" programs in South
Memphis and nutrition cl asses that give instruction in planning wellba lanced meals to the poor Blacks in Memphis.
111
The Huma n Opportunity Corporation in Austin has begun a foster grandparen t s ~reject. It recruits _aged low- income persons to work with r etarded
childre n.
The · Univers ity of Texas Law School ' has a Huma n Rights Research Council
staffed with law stude nts to inform low- income Negroes and 11exi can-Ame ricai:is
of their lega l ri ghts and privileges .
The Community Involveme nt Commit tee ~t the Uni vers ity of Texas at Austin
has s ubmitted recomme ndat ions for fi eld work in t he i r personne l manageme nt pr ogram to work ~ith minority groups and the hard - core unemp loye d to try to place
them in be tter jobs.
One school offers special programs fo r black stude nts before re g istration
and continui ng he lp to those who need it cturing _the acade mic year .
The Univer si ty of Chicago has allotted funds for a Summer Institute in
which bla ck student s prepare talented eighth and ninth graders for college
pre parato r y work.
Students at the University of Illinois at Ch i c ago Ci r cle provide d t ransportation one summe r for low-income childr en for t r ips to the ci ty zoos, parks
and museums.
A Community Arts Founda tion in Chicago recently star t ed a creative theatre
fo r ghetto residents and he ld productions in a lleys.
The Interdenom inationa l The ologica l Ce nter at Atlanta Uni versity has
specia l preparatory courses for fut ure ghet to ministers.
The University o f Pennsy lva nia s ponsored a program in c rim ina l l a w and
lit igation, in which students accompanied police during the ir r egular round
o f ac tiviti es and assisted pub l ic defenders . Cl ass c redit was give n for thi s
work.
The La w School at t he Univer s ity of De troit has a l ega l aid program fo r
ghetto r eside nts.
One group works on deve loping extracurricu l ar activities within the walls
of a prison -- spor ts, chess or bridge c l ubs,music l essons, quiz t eams , mana ging
of a l iterary maga zine and the institution ne ws pa pe r, ma nageme nt of a n insti tution radio progr am for inmate education , and par ticipat ion in weekly di scussion sessions .
One student committee works with boys who are confined to a state reform
s chool in Hestbora 1 Massachuse tts,
One group~ of student tutors works with children in the thi rd and fourth
grades to he lp them t o express themse lve s be tte r, by ha ving them di ctate t a l e s
to the tutors , pound out their i dea s on old typewriters , write short poems ,
make s cience obse rvations , kee p scrap books of thoughts , and meme ntoes of trips.
One program maintai ns an up - t o -dite collection of college, busi ness and
voca tiona l s c hool ca talogue s, a librar y of informat i on on college board examinations, financial aid , and on " A Be tter Chance" and other availab le compensa tory
e ducation programs.
COPE i s a Boston organization designed spec ifi cal ly to place t eenages
· f rom l ow-income areas in insti tut ions of higher educa tion, done by represen. tati.ves from the admi~sion offices of the l oca l universities, co ll eges and
vocationa l sch ~o ls.
At one school four. qua.lified volunteers ( including one who just completed
the course ) are currently t eaching the ir second round of a 10-week computer
cl ass for ghetto r es ide nts.
..
�Some it ag ina t i ve tu tor s ha ve start e d a biolog y ~ea r ni ng r oom with a
group o f chil dr e n who we r e intro duce d to the wo rld of nat ure , forei g n to
their a s pha lt a nd ceme nt wor ld, by raising ge rbils, ha tching chicken s a nd
ba by spider s, a nd growing pl a nts.
A council of Intercoll eg iate Af f a irs in Boston encourages c oope r a tion
among studen t volu ntee r pr ograms engaged in simil a r activities on di ffere nt
c ampu se s.
Bost on Univers ity's s c hool of Nur s ing ha s s ough t out 27 young wome n
fro m Ro xbur y who were interes~e d in the field of nurs ing bu t who lacke d
the a c a demic crede nti a ls fo r a dm i ss ion. Th r ough a progr am , these girl s
have be en succes s f u 1 ly br oug_h t i nto the regul a r nursing pr ogram .
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...
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Boston Unive r s ity offe rs it s f a cilities for recruiti ng and training
of volu nte e rs to any outs ide orga nization.
Ha rvard Busi ne ss School stude nt~ as s ist Roxbury ghetto busine ssmen.
Some schools ha ve progr ams to pr ov ide be tter training for prospe ctive
t-eache rs who wa nt to work in ghet to schoo ls.
Membe rs of th e Michi ga n St a te Univer s ity Mar ching Ba nd, "Ba nd Bro t he rs",
offer free music lessons to childre n fro m low e conomic areas of Lansing .
In one area "Community Garde ns" were establishe d on urba n r ede ve lopme nt
land. Through the purchase of sha res, the community owns these gardens and
the crops grown on the m.
Stude nts op e rate sever a l community cooperati ve store s in the we st side
of La ns ing , Michi ga n.
A p r ogra m o f consume r ·education "SHOP ALOP' , uses student volun_te e rs t o
aid inne r -city r e side nt s in the ir shopping .
In one community, t ee nage rs f r om the inne r city we r e give n the opp o r t unit y
to ope r a t e a stud e nt-run r a dio stat ion.
One f a cul t y depar t men t spo ns o r e d a housing s tud y to de termi ne wh i ch low
co s t hou s i ng des i gns would bes t suit the ne e d s of ·the pe opl e who will i nha bit
them.
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_ One un iversit y has as a r eq ui remen t fo r th e degree o f Master of Governmen ta l
Admin i st ra tion the as s i gnme nt of s tudents to var iou s de partments o f c ity go ver nmei1t.
Temp l e University has a Vi c e Preside nt f o r Ur ban Affairs to _coo r di nate
a ll ac tivit ies wi t h the community a nd has t he r es po n~ibi l ity for a Ce nter f o r
Urba n Affairs a nd the Studen t Committee Ac t i o n Ce nter .
Proj ect .Co l l ege Bou nd is a s ix wee k s ummer program fo r Ph ila de l phia. hi gh
s choo l g raduate s f rom l ow-income background s who have been a ccepted a t co ll eges,
bu t have s pec i f i c ed ucat io na l def i c i enc i es .
Ona s choo l deve lo ped a c ou nse lo r wo rk shop -- a th ree week summer insti t ute
t o i ncrease t he pr o fe ssi ona l compe t ence of city h igh schoo l gui dance counselor s
i n their wor k wi th students f r om minor i ty gr oups.
At the University o f Pennsy l vania, the Univer s it y Counc il on Urbanism anq
Rela t ed Human Resources i s conduc ting a survey of the Un iversity's schoo l s and
research centers in deve l oping interdis ci pl i nary faculty seminar s on urban
problems and charting i un i versity wide approac h to the study of urban l ife.
The Temp le University Hospital has developed a program for lm'1-income
· mothers , giving pre -na ta l and de li very care.
A soror ity developed a charm course (make up, ha i r care, personal hygi e ne,
�posture , etc.) for children from broken or inade quate homes.
The Wharton Gradua te School of Business has a Business Practice Serv ice
to provide management s e rvice to ghetto busine ss pe ople,
One school developed a pilot program conne cting housing r e ha bilita tion with
vocational educat ion, providing pa rt-time and summer employment for high school
students.
One University opened its olympic pool to poverty childre n duri ng the weel·
and provided in struction for ~n entire summe r.
One city' has started trave ling libraries to visit ghe tto areas.
Secretarial schools have de ve loped t e chnical-vocational courses in- clerical
skills to he lp needy girls find jobs.
One stude nt group p started a pro gr am of working with young ur ban childre n
as tutor s, playground aide,s , and group l eaders for boy a nd girl scouts. They
also work in hospitals in the escort service, as candy stripers , in feeding
pa tients and other assignments through the Red Cross. Others work with handic a pped persons, the me ntally retarde d, the deaf schoo l, and many other s.
Volunteers from MIT ha ve use d their special skills ip me cha nic s a nd science ,
for use on build i ng radios, erector set projecti, three- dbmen ~iona l maps of the
moon, airpla ne and rocket models for children.
Tutoring Plus in Boston has produced its own textbook called Tutoring
On-A-Shoe s tring".
Michi gan State Universit y has esta blished an Office of Volunteer Programs
to prov ide grea t er unive rsity support in a dvising a nd coordina ting a ll stude nt
volu ntary s ervice activities and organizations as well as to encourage the
formulation of ne w programs .
One schoo l de velope d a 13- week television cour se in Negro histo ry and
culture which was su bseque ntly reproduced f or u se in t eache r training in statesupported s c hools .
The Uni vers ity ~f Pennsylvania has a course, Urban Socia l Change a nd Huma n
De velopmen t, designe d to assis t the planning s tude nt in unde rstanding the process
o f socia l cha nge in the urba n environmen t through studying the a ttitude s of l owincome and minority popul a tions toward housing, renewa l, e ducat ion, emp l oyme nt
and welfare services. A spe cial r ead ing semina r is offered to familiarize the
planning student with interdisciplina ry l iterature on pove rty, combine d with
intens ive fie ld experiences in a criti ca l slum area near ~he University .
The State of Michigan has a divi s ion of Vo lu nteer Services . It is an in f orma tion center for all volun teer programs for a ll the coll ege s and univers iti es
in Michiga n . I t provides assistance and advice fo r individua l stude nt proj ec ts.
A state wide Gover nor ' s Confere nce is he l d a nnua lly for the di rectors of ind ivi dua I
programs a nd pro j e cts on the respective campuse s. The division does not pr ovide
p rogram monies , but p rovides ass i s t ance wherever po ss ible . Pre se ntly, the r e are
about 10 ,000 stude nt volunteer s in Michi gan at 27 different c ampuses . From this
ou ts tanding e xamp l e s e t by Mi chigan student volunteers , both Governor Romne y
and Lt. Governor Mil l iken have e ncouraged broa de r volun teer activities to be
undertake n by a ll segments of the popu l a tion.
New Yo r k City has an URBAN CORPS interns hip progr am designe d to of fer co llege
s tudents the opportunity to par ticipate first - hand in an urban society by t aking
a direct part in its administrat ion. For e l igible students, the program also
provide s a way to earn money thr ough the use of co ll ege work study fu nds . The
URBAN CORPS is administe r e d for the City of Ne w York by the Of fice of the }!a yor,
in coopera tion with the De partme nt of Per s onne l. The UR BAN CORPS is a coopera tive
ve n t u re of the City, the Fe de r a l Of fi ce of Ed uca tio~ and the par ti c ipat ing co lleges
and univers ities , Ever y ass i gnme nt i s individua lly prepared by the requesti ng
a ge nc y or de pa rtme nt, and is eva lua t e d as to its applica bili t y for a college
student inte r nsh i p pr ogram. The ma jority of a ssignme nts are within exi st · ng
a ge nc i es and depar tme ~ts, i n on - goi ng proj ec ts. Other assignme n t s make the
student a pa rt of s pec i a l t ask - f orce grou ps
Students ma y a l so be assig ned
to the centra l staff of the URBAN CORPS , working o n the administration and
operation of the program i tse l f.
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�WE PROPOSE A "MOD EL sc~:]O'::'LS" PROG RMJ
that can offer qualif ying scho o ls of all si ze s g rants which would develop
service programs that offer th e pr ,)mi s e of a more cons true ti ve and 111eaningful
role both for students as ·,"c.d l as to those in "nei ghbo r ing com:nuni t ies".
The program would f ocus our soci e ty 1 s educational techniques and talents on the
problems of lif e - eith e r in our ru ra l or urba n ar ~a s.
It will not be simpl.= to qu a lify f o r g r a n t s und,~r this pr ogram . Th e
government -has neither th e means no r the desi r e to inve st public funds in an
expen s ive progra m who se net effe cts will be margina l, wasteful, o r visible only
after protract ed delay. We intend to he lR 011ly tho s e scho ols, citi e s, stat e s,
and institutions whos e pl.ans ·ce ally s e rve to help oth e rs in th e ir strugg le for
a more meaningful and productive lif e . We pr opose the following guidelines
for dete rmi n in g an a pplicant 1 s qualific a ti ons for th e be ne fits - and achi eve me nts of this progra m. Many of th ese s pe ak dir e ctly to the university educationa l structu r e, as initi a ll y , work will probably be concentrat e d here. But
the over riding gen e ralities of r e alistic and co1npl e te planning will apply to
al 1.
The success that each de monstration progra m can have will dep e nd on the
quality of its pl.an11ing , and the degree of cooperation it elicits from the
variou s gov ernme n t al bodi e s concern ed (i.e . students, ad1ninistration, faculty,
community bodi e s, "Mod e l Ci tie s !' pe opl e , and those in local Urban Coalitions)
as well as private int e r e sts . Th e abs e nc e of this coop e ration be twe en contiguous
areas is was te ful, as we ll as blind to th e reality of urban lif e .
GUIDELIN ES
Service activities propo se d should respo nd to th e real nee ds of the
community, by indicating a r e l e vanc y to the community give n the r ea liti es of
the env ironme nt.
Adeq ua te ide n t ification mus t be ma de , of the a reas which would be be st
s e rve d thr ough studen t he lp in th e community , schoo l s , r ec r ea tion c e nters , me dical a nd me nta l hospit a ls, a nd proba tion de par t me nt s .
Lo ng t erm goa ls shou ld stre s s the e nc ou race me nt of commu nity r esi de nts
to wor k wi th exi sti ng educati o na l in st itu t io ns to deve l op ne w p r ograms espec i a ll y
in the t echnica l - voca tio na l fi e ld .
Pr o grams s houl d be des i gne d t o nurt u re ghetto residen t s with recognize d
ab i l ity -- i nte l lectua l , acade mic , art i stic, o r ath l e t ic.
The pr ograms should foster the deve l opmen t of l ocal and priva t e in i t i a tive
and widespre ad citi ze n parti c ipation in the pla nn i ng a nd execution of t he pro gram.
Lo ca l commun ity g roups shou ld be encouraged to eventually deve lo p and
finance their own p rog rams, and where po ssi ble peo ple in the commun ity sh ou l d
be t ra ined to co n ti nue th e spe c ifi c educationa ~ o r recreational proj ec t.
Contact shou ld be made with l ocal c ommunity agenc i e s and school systems
to i nsure program coordination with th e p re se nt communi t y activities.
Student s should have a hand in assessing the nature of the servi ce required and def i ning the t ask to be do ne.
Consideration ~hould be given to involv i ng adolescents in tutoring and
counse ling youngPr chi ldren for the ir mutual be nef it ,
The program planne d should be consistent with successful programs of the
pas t, as well as integrated into what they are now doing.
Experiences of often ovcrlo . ,-..d organizations lil·e the YNCA should he
ul"i l i 7.ed.
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vision of a ll aspects of the program .
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There should be sufficient pl a nning for projects to continue annually.
The progr am should be manned in each area by a single authority with
adequa te powers to carry out and coordinf:l te all pha s es of the program . There
must be a serious comm itme nt to the proj e ct on the par t of school and loca l
people.
There should be adeq uate professiona l sup erv ision, as we ll as ade quate
orientation and tr aining, of the neede d volunteers, and possible use of fulltime
social workers explored.
\
"Tutoring" progr ams should include· · information guidance cou nse ling, family
services, school-home li a iso n, referrals, motivation - building, and r ecrea~iona l
activities.
Emphasis on volunteerism should be evident and the areas where salaries
are necess a ry made very e xplicit.
There should be evidence that the appropriate depart me nts and groups
within the university have been cont ac ted to seek support for the propo se d program.
The program ·should reflect an attempt to make full use of the university
structure, not only its stude nts, but scientists, economists, a;chitects, mathematicians, as well as buildings, athletic fields and libraries. Attempts must be
made to focus resea r ch resources on problems facing the city, such as traffic
congestion, air pollution, housing, transportation, public health, etc.
Where possible a joint effort, e xcha nge , or coordina tion of programs with
ne ighboring schools should be made.
Lectures and spec ial programs should be o pen to the community and
scheduled with some att en tion to t~e ir inter es t and nee ds, e.g., a Black
American series .
Evaluation of tuto r ial pr ograms should be made throu gh a , ptitude
and psyc holog ica l testing.
i
Pl ans should indic a te an awareness of e x isting Fede r a l programs which
could provide financial sup port, and of t echn iques and projects which have provided .suc cessful examp l es in other areas of the countr y .
!
In stitutiona l support should be available as needed, wi th a posaible
seque ntial developmen t a lo ng these li nes:
a) an initi a l comm itment to the educationa l value of
prop~r ly e xe cuted service exper ience;
b) ia~u l ty assistance in training and orient atio n;
c ) pos ~ible futu re provisions for academic credit for
se rvice e xperienc e;
d ) sufficient finan c ial ba cking should be available so
as to perm it al l students to pa rt icipate;
e ) greater use should be made of work ~study fu nd s in pro jects tha t both soc ially produc tive as we ll as financ ially
remunera tive to students ;
f) greater use should be made of work - study fu nd s for off.
campu s work, both du r i ng the a c ademi c ye ar, as we ll as duri ng summer .
�GRANTS OF THE PROGRA~I
We recomme nd that participa ting groups rec e i ve two types of feder a l assistance :
1,
special grants be mad 0. for progra ms to group s whose plans
jus tify th e expenditure and fJ lfill the guid el ines of this
proposal and give pr omise of a me ani ng ful impac t on those
par ticipating .,
2.
that a ll available gr ant s a nd urban aids in th e fields of
educ a tion, we lfare , economic 143.215.248.55or tunity, and relat e d pro·grams be c o ntinu e d o r eK pand e d where justified .
Pl a ns wi ll b e revie we d by a nationat office according to the pr ec e ding
prerequi s it es. The n at i onal office wil l be s ta ff ed with p eop le kn ow l edg eab l e
about th e available f ed e ral funds as we ll as with ind iv ijual s experienced in
th e pl a nnin g and i mp l ementat ion of volun teer programs.
The research staff will have as its duti e s the gathering and dis t ribution
of all in f,::irmation that :nay b e of u se to submittin g bodies, as we l 1 as the
plannin g and organizing of r e l evant national and r egicinal s e minars and confe rences on student social-work activities .
Sma ll pamphl et s, educational materia l s a nd t he results of trainin g conf ~ r e nc es an d lead er s hip wo rkshops would be pr ovi d ed to n ew and eKpandi~g
organi z~t ion s , or to thos e who wished to improve th e quality of th eir prog ram .
Ano t h e r impor tant aspect of the in f ormat ion ga t he rin g function w6u ld c onc ern th e financing of s p-3 c i a l s t ud e nt pr o j ects . A stud c,1t g r oup int e re s t e d in
workin g with th e me nta ll y ill at a l oc a l ho sp :i.t a l would b e able t o obtain fro m
this offi.c e infor1nation as to th e funding programs in vari ou s g~ive rnm,~nt
a genci es which might be appr upri a t e for its financin g . Th e office wou ld also
assist th e stud e n t group i n p re parini th e pr oposa l fo r fede ra l fund s .
FED ERAL COST
,
Fund s wi ll b e re quir e d to ass is t participating gro up s in the i mp l eme n tation s of th eir mod e l d i:,rnon.stra tion pl ans. We sh0ul.d n ,, t u11der c s t -L11a te t h e
probl ems nor the f in anc ial n eedR involved in ach i e v i ng th e s e plan s . Th e very
sc a l e o f the d e monstrat i on a nd it s wi d espr ead eff e cts on th e soci a l s t ruct u r e
of a corn,nun i ty calls fo r coo r dination of th e com:nuni t y ' s pl. an ni:ig and a dmin istrative resour c es on an unp reced 2nted scale.
The app ro p r iate Fe d e ra l co n tribution t o this planning and i mp l e menta t i on
effort woul. d be _ _ __ _ ______ milli on th e fir.st year, gr;:rwL1g in in cr. 2rne n ts of
_ _ ___ __ mil li on p e r year.
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�SECONDARY SCHOOL STUDENTS
Th e scope and d epth of the work don e by univ ers ities, cities, states,
or instituti ons will often require detail ed planning, financi a l assistance,
and study .
But th e r e are man y things that could b e d one by our exc e ption~ l people
in th eir mid-teens in s e condary schools th at can also have a massive effect,
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such as working as tutors in their communit ies in some of the remedial
subjects, in secretarial fields, in hom e econom ics, and in the technical
studies as we ll as art, music, et c.
Th e President should ur ge ea ch Congr essman to communicat e with the
high schools in his district about the great n ee d for thes e projects.
The nation a l r esear ch staff of the "model schools"· could provid e " information
for these sc hool s.
Con gressmen would propose "mod e l" high school's each year
and th e ir services projects for con s id eratio n of Presidential awards .
Giv e n
the att e ntion and priority, this could b e a very ben e ficial program, both
in terms of th e community work and the recognition of the ear l y maturation
of today's younger gen e ration .
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�REWARDS
The Presid e nt through th e re s earch staff and evaluation board would
I
make v e ry pre s ti g~ous awards to tho se groups who durin g a year's time
initiat e progra ms mo s t e xempl ary of th e "model school's" guid e lin e s.
It would be ca ll ed th e
- - - - -awa rd, a nd c oul d involve a Pres id e nti a l
visit, a Pre sid e ntia l dinner, or a contribu t ion of Pre sid e ntial books or
res earch mat er ial.
To qu,alify g roups must:
1.
show si gns of ma j o r achi e veme nt of be ne [ i t to th e s u r roundin g
community.
2.
show si gns of mas sive stud en t invol vement.
3.
have produc ed a ction tha t is r e c e n t and a r e sult · -0f a
"mod e l s c hools" program.
Succ e s s ful action and innova tion, not pe rfection or completeness, will
be th e r ea l crit e ri a .
Fina li s t s would be chos en by a n impa rt i a l boa rd , a nd th e ir sp oke sman
woul d come to Was hington for a conf e r e nce a nd ~r e sen t a t ion of t h e i r prog r a m.·
Gr ea t e r u s e by th e Pres id e nt of f a cult y -stud e nt pri zes c ould a ls o be
u sed in a r eas , one part icul ar indi v idu a l f a c ul ty membe r or st ud e nt did or
i n i t i a t ed some pa rt i c ul ar l y i nnova tive id e a or p rog r a m by u s i ng a n educ a t i ona l
t a l ent or t echniqu e on a soci a l pro~ l em.
Th ese r e wa rd s woul d be v e r y impor t a n t t o g e ne r a t e t h e stud e n t-schoo l
ac t ion t hat i s n eed ed, to s tress l oca l invo l ve me nt , a nd to s t r ess t he n eed
for th e t eamwo r k approach t o th e pro bl ems .
�SUMMARY
The character of the urban university is weakest in the area of
communication and integration. There is a lack of communication both
within the university's structure and between the university and thos~
who can effectively utilize its assistance.
Integration goes hand in hand with communication in these areas.
If integration seldom exist s within academic institutions, it rarely
exists within its community. There is an ever increa sing need for the
univers ity t o pla y a more dive r sified; pa rticipa ting r ole.
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Higher education is often a symbol of medieval isolation, with
the unive rsity insulated in its castle from the surro~nding environment.
When a university doe s cross the moa t to involve itself with the co1~munity, the r e sults are oft e n uneven, f ragmentary and uns ystema t ic.
The emphas is of education rema ins on the wr itten word . In thi s cha ngeoriented society the "PhD" · and a long str·ing of publications seems
negative l y corre l a ted with problem solving capability. This program
"Why Not" or "Model Schoo l's", suggests tha t the focus of educati on
needs to be shifted awa y from the "print " to the problem.
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The pur po s e of educa tion is primari ly to pr~pare the student to mee t
the d ema nd s of h i s world. Stud ents r ecogni ze the need f or a more
relevant educationa l experience. And the community demands a more
invo lved university. Both need the university to become a more active
agent in problem s o lving and direct service. But in spite of all the
r e c e nt encouragement from the citizens and students , the university
continues its aloof r o le and a t times ignores its r e s ponsibilities.
The pover ty of an area breeds a psycho l og ica l handicap fo r a ll
ethnic groups. Welfare mo thers and f a the rs without j obs fr e quently
transfer the ir own guilt f ee lings to the ir child ren , and schoo l s ofte n
under line the children's uncer t ainty.
It is her e t ha t the fa cili ties of t he univer s ity and the
avai l abl e manpower of s tudents c an have a l arge i mpact .
i
!
The proposal s and requirements of "Why Not" (model schools )
address t hemsel ves t o t he ful l integration of the universi ty ' s r esources
.. i n sol ving the urban problem. The development of incr eased student
· _power and intensifi ed s tudent participation support our bel ief tha t
t radi t ional wa l ls mu s t be br oken down, both withi n the univers i t y
and t he surrounding communit y, in t he effort t ~ bring about a more
humane urban environment .
.. .· . To break down these wa lls and escape f rom the f eudal armor
of the cas tle-and- the-moat, univ er si t y admini s t rat or s and facul t y
must begin t o conceive of the universi t y a s a t otal socia l ins t i tuti on
which i s di ff er ent f rom the aggr ega t e coll ection of departments and
colleges . They mus t deve l op with the s t udents a balance bet ween t he
educational programs and basi c research , . social advocacy and problem
solving. It i s for them t o devel op a bal ance bet ween s cholars and
int el l ec tual a ct ivist s , be t ween student-orient ed pr ofess ors and
communi ty- orient ed problem s olver s . This ba l ance and coordina t ion
must be concept ual as well as or ganiza t ional t o succeed.
Thi s academic movement must be with t he assi s t ance of
student and communit y advice . The large bra in t r us t s of uni versiti e s
are becoming l i ke the f eder al government, bas tions of bureaucracy
wher e many people be come l ost. WHY NOT can dev elop conta ct be tween
the "l i ttl e people " , the university , and t he government. And the
link between all of t hese can be t he s tudent .
·
�Student tutorial programs already exist across the country and
provide a perfect link with the community upon which the university can
build. Tutorials are b e nficial to all parties involved if these parties
involved 1$:fr,q;,~*'. _ .,;m are given a role in the planning . and
supervision. Many successful tutorials have been initiated by local
residents. The r e sidents 6f a ghetto in Cambridge, Massachusetts,
created Tutoring Plus.
In the summer of 1964, a group of teenagers met
with a few older neighborhbod youths who were attending college.
All were trying to answer the questi"'on- of why a smal 1 number of the ~,.
older youths had made it to college while few of the rest had even
finished high school. Tutoring Plus now involves M.I.T. students, the
Polaroid Corporation, and Christ Church in Cambridge. The successful
example of Tutoring Plus points the way for the university, the city,
and WMY NOT.
In an increasingly open and secular ~ [ society, young people are
concerne d with their own identity, the nature and quality of their society '
and their relation to men everywhere. Tutorials bring a share of
awareness and individual identity to both tuto'r and tute e.
Ghetto
youths often feel unable to deal with their environment, m~ch less
change it. This alienatmon is often translaged into a self-fulfilling
hostility towards any future efforts at personal or niighborhoos
advancement.
This alienation can be overcome by student volunteers running
their own programs in conjunction with n e ighborhood community groups
and parents. Stud en t-run tutoring programs have inherent flexibility
which enables them to b e revised constantly to me et individua l needs.
They can ope rate with little of the stigma attach e d by adolescents to
schools and agency sponsore d programs.
First of all, the stude nt volunt eer is not too much older than
the individuals th ey work with, thus contributing to a sense of c onrad eship and und ersta nding be tween tutb t and tutee. Secondly, the college
stude nt, by his very pres e nce, is likely to provide the youth with a
role model whi ch is not memely a pastiche of guidance couns e lor
cliches but one which can communicate directly with the youth,
overcoming a great deal of their time, energy, and thought, to the
int erpe rsonal relationships that are an integra l part of any advanceme nt'
activity. The stud e nt, merely by his presence at coll e ge, is likely
to have acc es s to all types of informa tion his tutee may reque st.
Many problems of stud e nt programs can be overcome with the active
interest and participation of the univ e rsity. The natu re of a stud e nt's
lif e , at first not much to do and then to o much, ccn work to the disadvantage of th e se programs.
Some substitut e fo r mo ney is necessary to
encourage st e ady participa tion.
Course credit is the logical sugge stion .
Very few schools give credit for und e rgradua t e field work, but the
majority of schools do for gra dua t e s. This disc repanc y n eeds to b e
cha nged.
The successful chara ct er istics of stud en t vo lunt eer programs are
relevant to any larger e ffort at communit y and ilinivers it y invo l vement .
P roje cts must b e initiat e d on a sma ll scale with supervision ref l ect ing
cons ult at i o n with university, co mmun i ty, stud ents, city and private
enterpr is e . Projects sho uld also be allowed to dev e lop slowly to fin d
Imme diate funding of uninvestia dequate and respo nsible lo ca l l ead er s .
gated pro j ec ts may end in misspent funds , which could severely d amage
the entire effort.
Quality planning i s most important. Freedom of
progrsm selection must b e guarant eed to each l ocale. Student committees
must remain in.control of volunteer programs with local citizens.
Experience has shown that properly run vol~nt eer programs attract
the sincerest and high e st qua lit y w~rker~.
And that the introduction
of remuneration often alienates the socially motivated and attract s the
organizttionai joiner or job hunt er. The quality of seriice then
drops. Public do-gooders with their weekend house painting serve
only to irritate the ghetto resident.
'.
�~~------·-- -
-- - - -- - -
Tutori a l pr ograms are only a fraction of wha t a univ e rsity can do
in an urban c e nter. Not only do courses need to be chang ed to r e f~ect
,urban probl e ms but new priorities and policies need to be stated, Why
should a city have to employ outside economists or ma~imaticians whe n the
univ e rsity's are availabl e ? Why should computers and programmers be
hired whe n limitless rea e arch hours are available on campus waiting
direction? WHY . NOT could use· the univ e rsity faciliti e s in the summe r,
its athletic fields~ museums, lec t ure rooms , its bus e s, pools and
tennis cou r ts. WHY NOT could . work with th e city's and th e citiz e ns'
needs through the univ e rsity's reso u r c e s. The "mode l s chool s " pr ogram would
show that the governme nt and the university are willing to giv e a gre ater
responsibility to the stude nt. No J.onier- would there be e{lack of communication within the univ e rsity and between the university and thos e who
can effectiv e ly utilize its assistance. No longe r would s e gre ga tion- e x ist
betwe en depa rtme nts, students, the community and the univ e rsity. WHY NOT
seeks to coordinate and redir.ect th·e energies of education to problem
sol~ing within tqe city and to problem solcing training for the stud e nt.
Can we prepare our students t o fac e that cha ll e nge be tt e r if we
make working .in i t part of their education, ma ybe even for cre dit?
Can we go be yond the r e s e arch and pr oblem-solving with our colleague s in
the community of ins ti tut ions, and relat e ourselv e s to our ghe tto neighbors .·
to improve their environme ntal condition? Can we even go be yond the poorly
developed programs and technologies of today and d e velop new V$Sions of
ne ighborhood life to which both residential and university communities
contribute? Is it possibl e that th e urban univ e rsity can become a mo re
vi Lal mover in all of its missions by making th.i s att e mpt? WHY NOT.
In a
sub-syst e ms,
trend. Will
leadership?
soci e ty charact e ri zed by acc e lerating cha nge in all of its
th e problem sol v ing u r ban un i ve r $ ity s eems an ine vit a bl e
we be forced t o it, or will we anticipa t e ev e nts and take
That is the que stion. -n,ie an swe r is WH Y NOT.
,-
'
�Lillk
NEWS OF THE CORPS
Atlanta Urban Corps
30 Courtland Street, N. E.
Atlanta, Georgia 30303
'
VOLUME III, 1969
Recreation programs were discussed, and i ,t was
I NTERNS INITIATE PROGRAM
at this meeting that Karl Paul learned of the
Wheat Street Baptist Church, pastored by
lack of organized sports leagues in the ciw.
Rave.rend William H. Borders, has for many
By 3 P. M. that same day Karl had organized a
years served its congregation as one of many
meeting
at Howard High School to begin work
Baptist churches in Atlanta. Recently, howon drawing up such leagues. Seven of the fifever, Wheat Street Baptist has been making conteen Parks and Recreation D6partment supervisors
certed efforts to meet the social as well as the
attended. Over the week-end Karl compiled the
spiritual needs of its people. Serving in the
information riand ideas that came out of that meetChurch ' s Wheat Street Garden and Community Center
ing and by Monday had made arra{l.gements for the
are six Urban Corps interns. Under the super- .
'American League• and the 'National League•.
visi on of Reverend John Howard, Associate Pastor
As Karl pointed out, there will be differences
and head of the Education Center, interns Karl
between these newly formed teams and the typical
Paul of Georgia Tech, Sandra Mincey of Spelman,
Cynthia Kni ght of Clark College, Joanne Mitchell
sof:t.'l:>all leagues of Hometown, U. s. A. There
will
not be any freshly laundered suits with
of Mo rris Brown, and Phyllis Atkins and Linda
matching caps. Neither will there be an abundRobinson of Georgia State, are coordinating pro ance of regulation equipment.
grrups in recreation and community relations.
====.There is a lot more to community relations
Ass isted by three youth aids from EOA and ninethan a kid's participation in a softpall league.
teen Nei ghborhood Youth Corps students, the Urban
There is a·\.lot that can not be accomplished by
Corps interns work five days a week and often in
the Urban Corps interns at Wheat Street Baptist
the evenings to provide the children of the Wheat
Church Garden and Community Center this summer.
Street area with constructive experiences in
But there is now operating a recreation program
recreation and to investigate the social needs
that did not exist before these interns took the
of the community . Karl, Sandra, and Joanne
initiative. And there are numbers of Atlanta's
concentr ate their services in the area of recreinner city children participating in a constructive
ation while Cynthia, Phyllis and Linda work in
team sport who until now hardly knew that t he
t he community learning from residents their needs,
complaints and s uggestions for a better community.
opportunity for such programs could be made
The Ur ban Corps inte rn s have found that the
availal>le to them.
Wheat Street Baptist Church is making an effort
chil dren i n t heir charge a r e not at all accustomed
to partici pating in e ven t he mos t limi ted pro to answer the needs of i ts people . Urban Co rps
grams o f recreat i on and social stimulation that
i ntern s a r e helpi ng. It i s in programs such as
mi ddle-c lass children t ake for gr ant ed. In an
thi s one t hat the opportunity to learn and s erv e
becomes a per sonal and meaningful r eality.
interview with Karl Paul , who serv es as r ecreation
director for the Center , it was learned that the
STREET THEATRE ~
interns and Wheat Street Baptist are attempting
The first s eason o f the Library Urban Corps
to offer some alternative to this s ituation.
Street Theatre opened during the past week with
the performance of 11 A Soul Gone Home, 11 a play by
After meeting in committee with area supervisors from the city Parks and Recrea tion DepartLangston Hughes. The play was presented on July 7
ment, Karl found that there are virtually no
and July 8 drawing crowds of 125 at the first perarrangements in the city for sports leagues for
formance and 75 at the second. This same play
youngst •1rs. As Karl said, "Most of us have grown
was presented July 11 at the Trinity Methodist
up in towns where softball leagues for kids were
Church . Direcil:led by Arthur Pellman, instructor
the expected summertime recreation arrangement-of drama at Clark College, the Street Theatre wiil•
and her~ in the il.nner city where leagues would
present short plays throughout the summer on street
II
be so valu~le there is only one league established. corners, in churches, and anywhere that it is
On Friday, June 27 a meeting of Parke and
thought a crowa. will gather spontaneously. Five
Recreation supervisors was held at 10 A. M.
Urban Corps interns will perform with the theatre:
�They are Andrea Frye of Spelman, Young Hughley
of Atlanta University, Christine Smith of Georgia
State, r~chael Stublefield · of Morehouse ~d
Gary Enck of the North Car(!)lina . School ·of ·. Performing Arts.
· MEEI'ING OF THE COMMUNITY RELATIONS COMMISSION
TO .filLHELD.
The Community Relations Commission has re leased information on upcoming meetings to be
held throughout the month of July. The Urban
Corps feels that it would be to the interest of
interns, supervisors an others concerned with
our urban problems to attend one or several of
these meetings. Therefore, CRC's schedule is
included i n ~ ~ for the purpose of making
known to its readers an -excellent opportunity
for becoming acquainted with the Commission:
July 14 University Homes Area (8:00 P. M.)
Flipper Temple A.M.E. Church, 580 Fair
Streets. W.--an initial meeting to hear
the problems of the neighborhood.
July 16 Buck.head Area (8:00 P. M.)
The "Hall of Bishops," Cathedral of Saint
Phillip, 2744 Peachtree Rd., N. W.--a
city-wide meeting to discuss "What are the
responsibilities of whites in improving
human relations in Atlanta?"
July 22 Perry Homes Area (8:00 P. M.)
Perry Homes Community Center, 2125 Clarissa
Drive, N. W.--a return meeting to r eport to
the citizens on action taken a s a re sult of
CRC 1 s June meeting.
July 25 (2:00 P. M.) CRC1 s re gular monthly
meeting i~ Commit tee Room No. 4 City Hall.
July 29 Bellwood Area (8:00 P. M. )
Central City EOA Neighbo rhood Cent er
840 Mar i etta Str eet, N. w. --an i nitial
meeting to discu s s t he pro blems of the nei ghbo r hood .
PROGRAM TO CONTINUE
Plans are being made fo r the continuati on of
t he Ur ban Corps i nter n program in Atlan ta beyond
its summer 1969 employment structure . As more
specifi c i n fo rmation i s made availabl e , ~ Link
will keep its readers up-to-date with the proj ected pl ans. All interns, supervisors and
ot hers who are interested in continued involvement with the Urban Corps should remain in close
contact with the office and should make their
intentions known as soon as possible.
FINANCIAL ANNOUNCEMENT IQ. VOLUNTEER INTERNS
lll c0J.un.tee
nterns wo.crJdn,&=,wa,,Wl.:=,t.htte;;;=====
Atlanta Urban Corps program are advised that
they will receive payment of the first half
of their stipend on July 16 and the second
half on August 27. This announcement comes
from the office of Inmond Deen, Director of
Finance. Interns should plan to pick ~P their
paychecks between the hours of 1:00 P. M.
and 5:00 P. M. in the Urban Corps office on
the da.ys stated.
WATCH FOR W.M.R.A.RALLY
'\
SERVICE- LEARNING···coNFERENCE SP~ INTERN RJi!SP0NSE
Much could and has been said of the Atlanta
Service- Learning Conference which was held ·
JtinBi30~-July l (See Vol. II, The Link). There
were speeches and panel discussions, work groups
and informal sessions. Some people in attendance felt that they knew quite well what the
service-learning concErpt involves. Others were
there to find out. For the Urban Corps interns
who attended the two-day conference the experience meant different things and carried varying
degrees of credibility. The following are responses from six interns gathered a .week after
the Conference thus allowing a period of reflection on overall opinions:
(1) Diane Lewis (Spelman) Atlanta Girls Club:
"I'm afraid I was not very impressed by the Conference. It sounded to me as though it was
simply a chance for the Conference to pat itself
on the back. 11
(2) Rudine Arnold (Spelman) Kirkwood Center:
"I enjo~ed the Conference and especially the
discussion which pointed out exactly what it is
that the student interns are doing in the city.
The talk sessions were more valuable than the speakers."
(3) Raines Carrol ( Morehouse) City Personnel
"The Conference was generally pertinent, but the
students wanted to know more about _what is going
on in our own city now."
(4) Janice Snider (Univ. of Kentucky) Mayor's
Office: " The morning sessions were dull. Interns were not really a part of the Conference.
Hopefully the :tiext Conference will be more
meaningful. Frankly, I would have r a ther stayed
at work. "
(5) Anne Mayeaux ( Emory) City Perso nnel
"I wish th e Con f erence could have be en more concr ete. The whole thing was more r el ated t o public r el a t i ons than t o the intern s . However, it
is difficult when a co nf erence is plann ed in advance, a s i t must be, to relate cont ent to t he
peo ple who are ac t ually t o par t i cipate . I felt
that t he audi ence was more liber al than t he
speakers and that there wa s a sense o f r es t lessness in the audi enc e . It would have been good
if more s t udent organizat ions coul d have been
represented. I especially enjoyed the chance t o
get together with the other interns . After all,
we can learn so much from on e another."
(6) Sally Cantor (Lake Forest ) Service-Learning
1L.AJn0.ng :!;,ha -mGo&t
,mf)Grtan-
hme11-t
rf- the A-S1:J0
was the fact that numerous service oriented agencies were able to put aside their ovm individual
points of view and focus on the larger dimensio ns
of service-learning. Due to the nature of my
Urban Corps assignment I f eel that greate r attention·should be focused on the learning aspect
of the Urban Corps assignment. Interns need to
think out the meaning of their experiences • • •
and what it tells them about themselves, their
goals ·and their society. The service aspect is
easier to realize, but the learning aspect must
have equal focus. The first part of the Confer•
ence contained this element.
�Jun 17, 1969
Mr . Charles L . Davis
Director of Finance
City of Atlanta
Atlanta, Georgi
Dear Charles:
This is to request that you recognize the sign ture of either
Mr. Dan Swe t Ot" Mr. George Berry of thi office on all
r quie itions and oth r documents relating to the 1969 Atlanta
Urban Corps Proj ct.
Thie will involv
ll ppropriation accounts ere ted in our
general fund budget by resolution d ted June 16, 1969, with ·
the suffix
"U".
By copy of this 1 tter. Iain making th s
Purchasing Agent.
e r qu st of the
Sincerely yours,
R. Earl L nd r
Chi £ A dministr tiv
REL:fy
cc::: Mr. J. F ol'l' st O •
Officer
�Charles L. D~vis
etc.
Dear Charles:
recognize
This isto request that you k~KKX the signature of eih· er Mr.
Dan Sweat or Mr. George Berry of thb of f ic e on all requisitions
and other documents relatin g to the 1969 Atlanta Urban Gorp s
Project•.
This will Jd::t involve all appropriation accounts
created in our general fund budget by resolution dated
with
June 16, 1969 .&11asxil&KHthe suffix "U. 11
By copy of this letter I am making the same request of
the Purchasing Agent.
VTY
REL
�INTERNSHIP
ATLANTA URBAN CORPS
30 Courtland Street, N.E .
Atlanta, Georgia 30303
ASSIGNMENT
3
INTERN NO .
4
INITIAL ASSIGNMENT
NAME
REASSIGNMENT
FART TIME
ADDRESS


SUMMER
e
L
AGENCY
7
COORDINATOR
9
J
0
J
0
0
0
. --------------------~--1-------------------------------'----------------N9.
i
i
~1. 1 ! ._,
10
ADDRESS
12
ASSIGNME~T
I
I
11
NATURE OF ASSIGNMENT
I
I
I
I
I
TO BE COMPLETED BY AGENCY COORDINATOR
STUDENT
13
IMMEDI ATE SUP[RVISO R
[]ACCEPTED
ASSIGNMENT (NAME OF CENTER)
17
ASSIGNMENT HOURS
TO
F'ROM
DDECLINED
MON
ASSIGNMENT ADDRESS
UNACCEPTABLE
REMAR KS
18
TUES
16
WED
THURS
0
.
J
0
J
FRI
0
0

---------------------
-~

.--+---------------------------r-iSAT
STARTING DATE
21


SUN
TO BE COMPLETED BY INTERN IF DECLINING ABOVE POSITION
D
I decline this assignm e nt and wish to be re assigned because:

.------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Iii
D
I wish lo withd raw from the . URBAN CORPS. (s e e ite m 5 on reverse)
DISTR I BUT I ON :
WHITE , CANA ·R Y
·a.
GREEN - URBAN CORPS
FIN K - AGENC Y COORDIN A TOR
AGENCY COORDINATOR
BLUE - INTE~NS RECORD
FORM UC - 4
9 / 67 M-822278
�INSTRUCTIONS:
TO
URBAN
CORPS
INTERN:
l.
This is your intern assignment. In accordance with your stated preference,
you have been assigned to the position described in Box 11 on reverse
side.
2.
You MUST contact the COORDINATOR named in Box 8 immediately to arrange for an interview, at which time the exact nature of your assignment
will be outlined.
3.
Bring all five copies of this form with you to the interview . DO NOT SEPARATE THEM. At · your interview, the agency coordinator will fill out
Boxes 13 through 21.
4.
The agency coordinator will retain the pink copy . You will remove the blu·e
copy for your records. You MUST return the other three copies to THE
ATLANTA URBAN CORPS, 30 "Courtland Street, N.E., Atlanta, Ga . 30303:
IMPORTANT--NO PAYROLL WILL BE PROCESSED UNTIL THESE
FORMS ARE RECEIVED BY THE URBAN CORPS OFFICE.
5.
If, before the interview, you decide that you do not want this assignment,
check space in Box 22 and state your reasons.
If you wish to withdraw from the URBAN CORPS, check the space in Box
23 . THEN RETURN ALL COPIES TO THE URBAN CORPS.
TO AGENCY
COORDINATOR:
l.
The intern who brings this form hos been assigned to the specific position
whose Ass ignment number appears in Box 10 .
2.
If you accept the intern for the assigned position, complete Boxes
through ]l.
3.
Retain the PINK copy for your records.
4.
RETURN THE REMAINING FOUR COPIES TO THE INTERN .
5.
If th e intern is not acceptable or decl ines the pos ition, check the appropr iat e space in Box 13 and _return al I five copies of the form to the intern.
!,1
NOTE :
If there ore any questions regarding placement procedure, please feel
free to coll the URBAN CORPS at 524-8091 or write:
ATLANTA URBAN CORPS
30 Courtland Street, N. E.
Atlan t a , Georgia 30303
�r
Lillk
NEWS OF THE CORPS
Atlanta Urban Corps
30 Courtland Street, N. E.
Atlanta, Georgia 30303
PEOPLE OF THE URBAN CORPS
As the program of the Urban Corps develops, an increased
personnel is necessary. The people we have working on the
administrative staff are a group of interesting men and women
from various backgrounds; together they are coordinating the
many aspects of the Urban Corps. Let us introduce them to you!
Betty Lue Underwood and Marjorina Langford will both be
working in the administrative offices as secretaries. Betty Lue is a
junior at Morris Brown College and is from Barnesville, Georgia.
Marjorina is a freshman at Georgia State College and is from our
own Atlanta. Both of these girls are Urban Corps interns, financed
by the College Work Study Program.
Dianne Lovejoy, a senior at Price High School, will work with us
as an intern with the Neighborhood Youth Corps. She has worked
with E.O.A., and will be our receptionist for the summer.
The Education and Evaluation team is made up of Resna
Hammer, Education Director, Maggie Gerber and Dawn White,
both Education Coordinators. Resna received her BA from Bennett
College, and then served in the Peace Corps first as a volunteer for
two years and then as a selection coordinator. She is married and
living in Atlanta with husband Jeffrey and 10 month old baby,
Rachel. Maggie is at present candidate for her Ph.D. at Emory
and received her BA from the University of Denver and her MA
from Boston University. She has worked as co-director for the
American Friends Service Committee and has taught both at Clark
and at Northern Michigan University. She and her husband Lesl ie
live here in Atlanta. Dawn received her BA at St. Francis College,
Indiana, and is now working on her MA at Atlanta University. She
is originally from Ceylon, but her family has been living in Detroit
for the past nine years. She has worked with E.O.A. both in
Atlanta and in Indiana and taught for a short time at a parochial
school in Fort Wayne, Indiana.
Coordinating our staff are Sam Williams and his assistant Dianne
Wilson. Sam, a former student body president at Georgia Tech, was
director of President Nixon's task force on youth in federal
government during the past year working in both Washington, D.C.
and New York. Dianne, who received her BA from Spelman and
has done work toward her M.A. at Atlanta University, is in charge
of all special programs. She served in Kenya for one year in a
program of the World Council of Churches in Harlem, N.Y. as a
church program director.
Another of our busy, hardworking staff members is Sue Zander
whose position as Executive Assistant makes her an important
"information source." Sue received her B.A. from George Peabody
College in Nashville, Tenn., and has worked with E.O.A. here in
Atlanta as a personnel assistant since 1964.
The Urban Corps financial program is being handled by Steve
Mwamba, payroll coordinator, and Inman Deen, physical director.
Steve, originally from Zambia, Africa, has been in the U.S. for the
past four years attending first the University of Nebraska and then
Georgia State, majoring in finance. He and his wife Ivy and
daughter Suzgyo live here in Atlanta. Inman comes to our program
from Tulane University where he has just finished his first year of
law school. He has worked in the Fulton County Juvenile Court as
a probation officer for the past three years. Inman and his wife
Mary will return to Tulane in September.
The job of keeping the Urban Corps before the public goes to
Ken Millwood and Tara Swartsel. Together they will be publishing
the newsletter and contacting radio, television and newspapers.
Ken, who is from Marietta, has just graduated from the University
of Georgia where he majored in journalism. He plans to go to the
Businc:;s School at Georgia to obtain his M.A. Tora, who has JUst
graduated with a B.A. in Art from Agnes Scott College in Decatur,
has baen working with the development of the Urban Corps since
this past winter.
AGENCY SUPERVISORS PARTICIPATE IN
"CRASH COURSE"
On Tuesday, June 3, forty-five agency supervisors who will be
supervising Urban Corps interns met at the Urban Corps office. Mr.
Dan Sweat, City Deputy Administrator, was on hand to make
introductory remarks. A film, " Action S mer" from the National
Urban Corps office in New York, was shown to help the
supervisors visualize the kind of work that their student interns can
carry out this summer. Explanations of several operational areas of
the Urban Corps followed: Steve Mwamba discussed the intricacies
of the payroll procedure to be used throughout the summer; Dave
Whelan explained legal procedures, contracts and special
arrangements to be carried out by the Urban Corps and the
agencies; and Resna Hammer gave a short description of the
particular areas of the Urban Corps program. As Sam Williams said
after the meeting, "You know, we've been dealing with paper work
for so long here in.,_the office; meeting with these supervisors todal/.
brought the program to life again for us - we are working with
people! The success of the Urban Corps really does depend as
much on these supervisors as it does on the interns. The enthusiasm
exhibited by the supervisors gave our staff a real shot in the arm."
INTERNS MEET FOR ORIENTATION
On Monday, June 9, fourteen student interns met with the
Urban Corps staff for an orientation program. The same film which
had been shown to their supervisors at the meeting on June 3 was
presented to the interns in the sky room of the old city
auditorium. Following the film, Dave Whelan, Resna Hammer and
Steve Mwamba explained such aspects of the Urban Corps summer
program as payroll, education evaluation, and intern placement. As
Dave pointed out to this group of interns who are to begin work
this week ... as the first interns to be "on the job" theirs is a
responsible position. We are working with people - our student
interns are, in fact, the Urban Corps.
OUT OF CHAOS . . . OUR OFFICE HAS A
"FACE U FTING!"
The bare, football field-sized echo chamber that our office once
was is now beginning to look like a new place. With the addition of
partitions the large room on the 2nd floor of the old city
auditorium now is divided into five smaller offices with a large
center room and a movable partition which allows fOI" the addition
of a sixth office space which can be adapted to various sized
meetings. Office equipment has been provided by several of our
special friends, among them the Atlanta Police Department and the
city Purchasing Department. The Police Department has given us
thirty cushioned straight chairs to be used in large meetings while
the Purchasing Department has provided a filing cabinet and many
"emergency supplies" - a special thanks goes to Mr. Al Randall of
that department.
We have also found that Mr. Dan Sweat, City Deputy
Administrator, can run a mimeograph machine and "tote" a load
of paper - because he helped us do it and w th,mk him!!!
�ATLANTA
LEAANING
t
l
'l
i
I
I
present
Jf


,#i


)
A BROAD AFPROP.r.1-1 TO R.:W ID TRANr .>:T
JI
or
·: :he imi)act of body size c.n tb~ tra=i,:,-;,ortad.on inct•1stry
A1'LAt-~TA SEF-5,..I 1~"E L'f.:A~~";JU'!G CONFEP.E")JCE
Whita Ro us~ ~fotor Inn
iO I!"u!iton St.ce"' t , l~
Atla~t a, c ~~rgia 30303
J,me 30, 1SG9
�THE ATLAN'rA &'ERVICE•·LEARNING PLAYERS
·cad apprc,ach to rapid transit
a
or
The Impact of Increased Body Size on the Trensporta~ion Industry
££:_ §.,!
0 F
.,...
___ ___ __
,..,
.,.
CHARACTERS
Narrator.
M.. T. Roads ••
0
0
0

o.
L. McDonald
0

\)

c.
T~ Streeto
0

a.
0
Co
"Vic" Leider. o
e
.~hief Planner, Same Old Roads & Traffic
Association (SORTA)
.Environmental Investigations with Economic Impact O~:~:'!."e (EIEIO)
.
•• City Traffic Enginee~

Merchants
. . . .President,
Chairman of
•• . .. .Board Me~ber, SORTA
& Peoples oank and
SORTA
Mrs. Minn Ority~
Charlie Goodtime.

0
o
.Junior in Industrial Engineering, Agnes
Bror.m Clark Univarsity (ABCU)
Cyrius Uomeworker • • • • • Graduate Student in Psychology, ABCU
Millie Tants • • • •
o
.,
oSenior in Political Science, ABCU
Constant ~~e Dewingood •• SP-uior in Sociology, ABCU
Able No Willingo •
•• Senior in Political Science, ABCU

0
.
. • •Dean, ABCO
A. K. De~ic~ e - .
Carrie Burden • • • • • • • Financial Aid & Placement Officar, ABCU
Wright N~ Wright,III • • .Profes&or, Political Science, ABCU
Ray Levant • • • • • • • • Associate Professor 1 Economics, ABCU
I rvin Core • • •
.
o
.
~
o
••
Dir~ctor, Service-Learning Agency (SLA)
Leah Zonn • . ••
. • .o .Assistant Director, SLA
Miss Peller., • • • • • • • Secr etary to Mr. Core
• • • Grant Assignments Depertment, (EGAD)
..
�THE Il\1G.REDXENTS OF SERVICE.,.LEARNING
Plai::e., • • • •
The Conference Room 0£ SORTA(Same old Road &
Traffic Association)
Time. o • • ~ • • ~ Spring
Characters Present. M. T. Roads, Chief Planner, SORTA
o. L. M~Donald, Director, EIEIO(Environrnantal
Inveetigations with Economic Impact Ofiice)
C. T. Streets, City Traffic Engineer
C. "Vic" Leider, Chair.man of SORT.A
Mrs. Minn Ority, SCRTA Board Memb~r
Situation • • • o • • Enno has just; conf:i.t"tD.ed reports tha.t body size
is increasing with each generation. The impact
of this factor on SOP.TA plans for transportation
facilities is the s ubject of this creeting~ SORTA
does not have the manpower to explore the dimensions
of the problem and is seeking help.
§£~ne II
o

o
Stutl~nts
0
-
-
IQ.~
Place., . . . . . . .
The Student Union Coffee Shoppe of Agnes Brown
Clark University (ABCU)
Ti.me •• o • • ., • • Spring
Characters Present. Charlie Goodtim~, Junior, Industrial En 6 ineering
Cyrius Homeworker, Gxaduate Student, Psychology
Millie Taute, Senior, Political Scienee
Constant Lee Dewir.g~od, Senior, Sociology
Able N. Willing, Junior, Economics
Situation • • • • o • Students ar,e discu!Js:f.ng their views of their courses
and education and society in gene r al. ~alk turns
to pl ans and w!shcs for the coming summer and beyond.
o
~cene I l l • ~ n ca tional Institution
Pl acs • • • • • • • o Dean's office at ABCU
Ti me . e • ~ • • • • Spring
Characters Present. A. K. Demic, Dean
C::ar r::.e Burden, Financ ial Aiu & Placement Officer
Wri ght No Wright, III , rrofessor, Pol i tical Science
Ray Levant, Associate Professor, ~conomi cs
Situat ion • • • o • • The group is m~eting as an ad h0c commi tte~ t o
discus s student problems fr;;;-~adruini s tration
and -f aculty persp~ctiv es On the agenda are :
(l) academi c standards , (2) student unre st , (3)
f i nancia l problems, (4) physical fa c i lit i es,
(S)counsel i ng.
Seen ~
m
A Coor <l i ne ting Agcut
Place • • • • • • • • Off i ce of SLA (Service~Learnfng Agency}
Ti me • • • • • • o • Lat e the same spring
�{S~~n~ lV - continued)
Ch.~ractcre Prcs2nt. Irvin Core, Director, SLA
Leah Zonn, Assistant Director, 5LA
Miss Peller, Secretary, SLA
Iva Grant, EGAD, (Exemplary Grant Assig..1II1ents
Department)
Situation... ••• o • Contacts have been made with SORTA, A3CU and
students securing agreement to coop~rate in a
service•leaming project on body size and trans
portation. Funds have been secured. The agree
ments are to be confirmed and a first meeting o~:
the project participants is to be sche~tle&~
0
0
ACT
-SERVICE-LEARNING IN ACTION
II
Place • • • • • •
o
o
SOR'!A Office
Time . . . . . . . . . Lato n,r!ng
Characters Present • M. 'le Roacfa
O. L. McDonald
"Abe" Willing
Ray Levant
Leah Zom,
Situationo o • • • • Project ·p articipants are meeting as a project
committee to help the intern define his task
more specifically and to discuss roles.
S£2,.ne II• Education Interpretation
I-lace •• • • • • • •. Professor Levant's Off ice
Time • • •. • • •. • .. Mic! .. Summer
Characters Present • Ray Levant
"Abo " Willing
Situation. • • • • o Intern is well into his project and he i s dicr.ur;.1~.:1~
some of his observations and irleas with hie couu~eic~,
.§._c~ne__lli, - Coordin_~
Place.
o
...
.
..
.
Service-Learni ng Agency Of fice
Time .• • • • • • .. • Lat e Summer
Characters Presen.t .. Irvin Core
! -eah Zonn
Situation • •
o

••
1nternshi ps for the summer are almost over and



he office is reviewi ng the situation.




Scene IV - Field Revt ".t i Evaluatioq
Place. • ., • • • . , • ;-, j R~
Time • • • • o • • o Late Summer
Character s ?:r~s-~ nt e M. T. Roads
�Page 3
Act rr - Scene IV, Contirn:ed
O. L. McDonald
"Abe" Willing
Ray Levant
Irvin Core
Situation • • • • • • With only a few weeks to go, the p:roj ect is
reviewing wi t h the intern his final steps ancl
the preparation of ht s report. Discussion of
ccmmunity and educational issues evolves.
ACT III
Follow~Up and Aftermath
Scene I - Atlanta Service-Learning Conference
. .
White House Motor Inn
. . . . Now
. All oi you
The scr i pt from here on is yet
.
Place ..
• • • •
Time • • •

Characters Present
Situati on.
• • • •
t.o be written.
'
��Mayor's Comments to Atlanta Service-Learning Conference
June 30, 1969
White Houee Mot or Inn
70 Houston Street, N. E.
Atl anta , Georgia 30303
Total Attendance:
300
Purpose o f Conference
To explore existing service programs invol v i ng you th
and governmen t i n urban, domestic, and f oreign setting
and develop a metro-Atlanta model of service-learning
between area colleges, government units , age nc ies a nd
~tuden t s.
Two day Conference sponsored by:
Urban Corps
VISTA
Corps
Atlanta Colleges
Economic Opportunity Atl~nta, Inc.
Teacher Corps
Southern Regional Education Board
Peace
�- DRAF T -
Introductory remarks - welcome to Atlanta, etc.
We canno½any more than past generations, see the face of the i uture, 11
Ralph McGill has writeen.
tion."
"But we know that written across it is the word Educa-
Education today is r e pidly changing from the old monolithic forms of
ye s teryear.
Todays youth are demanding educational reforms.
-
Many of you young
-
people are in fact creating a new kind of education through your off-campus set:vice
activi8ies.
The service-learning concept i a not new but its youthful applica tions
are having a new a ffect on both domes tic and foreign problems.
Whether young
pe ople are se rving in the Peace C~rps in Zambia or workigg in Cabbage Town as a
VISTA Volunteer they are having a learning experie nce.
They are learning that education doesn't end at the class room door.
In
f act those of you that are Urban Corps interns will probably be amazed at your own
learning exper i ence after this brief summer .
The Urban Corps is a n excellend example of educatioIBlinnovation coupled
with service.
Interns will see the problems of our ci t y by a ctually participating
in city government as wel l &s private agencies.
paaatical extension of their academic studies.
They will be learning through a
In short, they help the city, expand
their education, and help pay college expenses - all in one.
Thie Urban Corps is truly a student program.
I firat heard of thi
idea
of relevant internships in city government when a group of student leaders from
v rioue Atlanta colleges came to City Hall with the idea more than a year ago .
These
studente wanted a way to learn about the city and perform a service by actually work•
ing in it.
After many meetings and a gre t deal of encouragement by Dan
Sire t
of my
staff and Bill Ramsay of the Southern Regional Education Bo rd , we provided a group
�young activists some support to see if this program would work.
Almost all of
the planning, development o f jobs and placement was actually done by students • .
From what I hear, the intern jobs are very challenging and exciting.
Just the
physical appearance of City Hall has been greatly improved by all these young
faces.
Naturally there will be some disappointments and I'll assure you that
you'll become frustrated a nd you'll see that we do have some almost un•solvable
I urge you not to become discouraged but to help us find new ways of
problems.
correcting the ills of our seeming l y archaic system.
We need your youthf~l
enthusiasm and you'd be surprised how it will change the attitude of those in
our c ity who have been laboring, almost alone at times, for change and progress.
We in t he city hope that this brief exposure to our problems and potentials
will attract some of you young people t o return after graduation and pursue t his
as a caree r.
Governing our cities is this nations greatest problem.
It is an
exhaustive but rewarding e xpe Lience that you young people mus t now begin to take
responsibility for.
I hope the Urban Corps is only a. beginning .
Already we're ha-ting pre•
dictiona of three-fold e~cpansion of this intern program for next year .
Just the
f act that nearly 1,000 students applied t his year is astounding , and when one
c onsiders tha t Atlanta has almost 40,000 students a nd nearly 35 colleges we can~
begin to see the poten tial .
people .
We reed t h i s f ocused, a ggres3ive concern of young
We need move moveme nt between t he two worlds o f academia and city .
In New York, a n outgrowth of their intern p rogram haa been a rapid exchange
of ideas a nd personnel between city gove rr,rn.en t and universi t ies .
a miable rela t ionship of unive rsity and c ity i n Atla nta .
We need this
We have just begun a n Urban
Life Center at Georgia State which al l local colleges are being asked to participa t e in .
We i n the cities mus t t ake grea te r advan tage o f our universities and
v i ce versa .
- 2 "'
�As John Garnder has said , t he three main purposes of the univers i ty are
research, teaching, and service to the community.
We've seen how students are
serving the community already but there are still many unexploited potentials
inside our college gates.
If we look at the h istory of higher education we note that the greatest
impetus was with the Land-Grant University almost 100 years a go - a system built
to aid our agricultural society.
Today our society is urban.
But by comparison,
our education system has not properly responded t o our change in society.
more people working on our c i ties problems.
We need
If t he discipline of city planning
can be used as an example , we will recognize the dramatic crisis.
universities combined we graduate less than 400 plam1era per year .
In all our
More graduates
of Medieval History are pu t on the ;ob marke.t t han are urban experts.
What do we i n the cities d o f or manpowe r.?
We must innovate and try to
compete with indus t ry for talent and we are in the d isadvantage." Hence another
r eason why our c ities a r e ungoverna ble.
Key urban perarnas i on posts are occupied by lawyer s, ddueeot•; undet:takers ,
c.lergymen~, busines smen, bankd r s and social workers.
produced by un:!.versities .
These professionals have been
The3e people are usually consulted on a technical o r
opecialized problems' but the solving of ~be se p).·oblems depends on r elated matters
almost always falli ng outside the e,q,ertise of t he consults'bb.
In other words,
the ke y exper~a in our ur ban society - through the exercise of their expertise enter a realm o f generalization for which t hey haven't been properly prepared by
undergraduate or professi.onal education.
Therefore , universities ghould try to
expose their prof essionals i n urban areas to s ome type o f urban education.
The
The simplest method is by practical experience such as the Ur ban Corps, and the
eventual solution is more teaching in urbnn conce pts .
We must not neglec t t he professor i n our plan for cotmnunity involvement
of our universities .
····------·-.
ways hbould

-----
oe
f ound t o i nvolve professors in a r eas o f their
�academic prowness in the city.
poofessors too!
Perhaps we should have an Urban Corps for
I am s ure that there are needed areas of research in the city
that would interest &any college instructors.
This would insure that teaching
does indeed remain relevan t to our actual needs.
In order to facilitate this
dialogue, we must have more cooperation between colle '., ces.
should be able to more freely move between campuses.
Students and faculty
Atlanaa colleges are unique
and should keep their individu~l identity, but should encourage exchanges.
We
have great medical schools, law schools, schools of urban design and the ~reatest
predominantely Negro college complex in the world.
We've only looked at the city as a laboratory, let's see how the city
can help the university .
Many young innovators on the urban scene could se rve as
gneaa lecturers or associa te professors in our colleges.
A vivid example of this
is Bill Allison, now Direc t or of EOA, who serves as an associate professor at
Georgia Tech.
This type of exchange s hould be greatly encouraged and ways should
be found to foster a nd develop both professor-city exchanges and administra t orcampus exchanges
We must not only research prob lems but we mus t implement them too.
Often
times a very good report is writtnn - only t o gather dust - or is written not with
an eye for implimenta t ion.
hoods.
It is the
sent
They are tired o f being st ud ied.
with reside nts in our deprived neighborThey want help.
Research must be balanced
by practicaHty and kept relevant .
Our cities will not
plan ioi that .
g o away.
They will eJtpand and multiply .
We
must
We must demand hilp from our univers ities .
The Urban Corps should only be a beginning .
We need youthful enthusiasm
of young people in VISTA, returning Peace Corps volunteers, Neighborhood Youth Corps
enrollees, service groups on campus, adult educat i on tutor ing by students in the
dozens of service projects .
We need more exchange between our city a nd our campuses
�on all levels.
I hope this Service-Learning Conference explores all these
possibilities and presents them to people who will acto~o develop and carry
them out,
Ralph McGill always said the South was the most exciting area of the
country and the most exciting part of the South was to be young and taking part
in its development.
Those of you who are stddents today must aa:cept this challe9ge
of developing the South and our city, and those of you who are educators must
help them.
�,---1 -
IN SERVICE-LEA..'lliI NG PROGRAMS:
A PRELL~INARY REPORT
Determining the degree to which area colleges and universities a.re involved in service-lear ning programs and ascertaining the attit udes of higher educatfon stt1.dents, faculty9 and
administrators to·ward conununity involvement constitute two of the
principa l concerns of the Atlanta Serv ice Learning Confer ence.
To
provide insight into t hese two areas of special interest, a number
of college students are currently in the process of completing a
survey of ten area coll eges and univer sities.
include;
The ten institutions
Agnes Scott College ~ Atlanta University, Clark College,
Emory Unive.:-sHy~ Georgia State College, Georgia Tech, Morehouse
College, Morris Erown College, Oglethorpe College, and Spelman
College .
As part of a br oader s tudy of student manpower resources,
this survey will seek ar,suers to the f ollowi ng kinds of questions:
1.
To what extent does the involvement of higher education
institutions va~y fr om campus to campus?
What f actors
account for the variations?
2.
To what extent does the degree of service-lear ning
acti vities vary between different schools and departments within particular i nsti tut:f.ons?
Wi1a t account s f or
the variat ions?
3.
What areas of connnunity life mos t r eadily lend themselves
to student involvement ?
4.
What are t he relative r oles of students , f acul ty, and
administrative personnel i n community development
activ ities?
5.
To what extent does exi.sting curriculum encourage stude~t involvement in the community1
Uo students require
academic credit for partici?ation in community activities?
6.
How important are community involvement programs to stude!lts, fact,lty 9 and administrators?
vfuat
do the terms
"community involvement" and "serv:i.ce-learning 91 suggest
to these three important clientele groups?
�'
...
'• :t_
7.
What areas of community concern presently receive
the greatest attention from higher education?
The
least concern?
8.
Do existing pat t erns of service-learning practices
suggest that some institutions can best serve by
speciaUzing in particular programs?
It is expected that answers to the above questions will
be of value to ASLC for the following reasons:
1.
The research will identify both the forces facilitating and the forces inhibiting development of the service-learning concept.
2.
Cataloguing existing programs of community activities
can assist ASLC'S role in coordinating service-learning
programs and directing students into programs most
suitable to their individual preferences.
3.
The research will mirror the present scope of servicelearning programs and i~entify areas of neglect.
4.
In the long run 9 certain priorities may be set and thereby assist ASLC in gaining the essential financial resources for funding service-learning progr ams in the areas
demanding the greatest concentration of connnunity efforts.
�ATLANTA
SERVICE
LEARNING
PLAYERS
present
A BROAD APPROACR TO R.:\~ID TRANeIT
or
t he i mpact cf body s i m'a on t~e t ra:..Gpo.:ta.t ion i ndustry
A'rLAt~T~\. SERV:'~E LEARNI't1G CONFERENCE
Wh ite F'.ouse Motor Inn
70 H~us~on Str eet, NE
Atlant a, Georgia 30303
June 30, 1969
�THE ATLANTA SERV!CE..,LEARNING PLAYERS
a · ·oad approach to rapid transit
or
The Im!)act of It1c1·~a.sed Body Size on the Transportation !nctu.otry
CAST
, uo -
· ·-
OF
-
CHARACTERS
-
-
-
-
,... - - -
- -- - -
-
Na.rra to·,:
M. T. Roads.
o.
c.

L. McDonald
~
Q



.. . . .
.Chief Planner, ~amc Old Roads & Traffi~
A~sociation (SORTA)
.Environmental Inves~igations with Economic
Impact O~:Hce (EIEIO)
.
T... Streeto
o o • • City Traffic Enginee=
"
Co "Vic" Leider. a •• .• • President, Merchants & Peoples Bank and
Chairman of SORTA
Mt:s .. Ninn Ority.,.. • • • .Board Member, SORTA
Charlie Goodtime. • • ~ .Junior in Industrial Engineering, Agnes
Brown Clark University (ABCU)
Cyrius llomaworker • • • • • Graduate Student in Psychology, ABCU
.
.
Millie Tan.ts • • •
. .s~nior in Political Science, ABCU
Constant t~e Dewingood •• Senior in Sociology, ABCU
Able N. Willinga • • • • oSenior in Political Science, ABGU
A. K. De~ic• • • • • • • • Dean, ABCU
Carrie Burden • • • • • • • Financial Aid & Placement Officer, ABCU
Wright Ne Wright,III • • • Professor, Political Science, ABCU
Ray Levant
Irvin Core.
eAssociate Professor, Economics, ABCU
• •
e
e

.Director, Service-Learning Agency (SLA)



Leah Zonno- • ••
e
••••
Assistant Director, SLA
Miss Peller• • • • • • • • Secratary to ~fr. Core
Iva Grant ••
• •
.Grant Assignments Dep~rtment,
(EGAD)
�~---
Ac··r ....I
THE INGREDIENTS OF SERVICE.-.LEARN!NG
Pla~e., • • •
The Conference Room of SORTA(Same old Road &
Traffic Association)
Time. o • • o ~ • c Spring
Characters Present. M. To Roads, Chief Planner, SORTA
o.. Lo McDonald, Director, Elil:IO(Environrne11ta1
·•
0

0
- I n'!l~s tigati ons wit h Economic Impact Offi.ce)
Si tuation • • •
Scene I I
0
Place.,, ..
u
- - . . . - .~
o

o
C. T. Streets, City Traffic Engineer
C. 111Ji.c" Le ider, Chairman of SORT.A
Mrs. Hf.nn Ority, SORTA Board Membe r
Em10 has· just confirmed reports taat body size
is increasing with each generationo Th-3 impa!:t
of this factor on SORTA plans for transport a t ion
facilities is the ~uhject of this ~eeting~ SORTA
does not have the mar.power to explore the dimensions
of the problem and is se~king help.
Students
-


o

0...
~
TtmP.. o o • • o •
Cha;:-ac t:ers Pr esent
Si tuati on • • • •
o
o
o
o

The Student Union Ccff ~e 6hoppe of Agne s Brown
Clark Univers i ty (ABCU)
Spring
Charlie Goodti m~, J u~ior, Industr ial Engineering
Cyr i us Homewor ker, Gxaduate Student, Ps7chology
Mill ie Tc'.l ut e, Sen:!..or, Pol i tical 8cience
Cons t ant Lee De;,1ing~od, Senior , Sociology
Abl e N. Will i ng , Juni or, Economi c s
Student s are dis cus s i ng their v i ewo of t heir cour ses
and education a~d s oc iaty in general. Ta l k t urns
to pla~s and wishe s for the coming summer and beyund .
An Educ,' itional Institution
-El~c:3ut.:l .III
. :-. .. a;,.~-.a::-


o

"

o Deal'•' s off i ce at ABCU
Time • • • • • o • • Sprir.g
Charac t ers Pr esent . A. K. Demic, Dean
Carrie Burden , Financ i al Aid & Placement Officer
P1ac.:l . • •
Situation,
o


o

Wright No Wright , III, P1:r.ifessor, Political Science
Ray Levant , Associate Professor, tconomi cs
Tne gr oup i s meet i ng as an ad hoc committ?.e to
discuss s t udent problems fr143.215.248.55ad~inistration
ar.d fac ul t y perspactive. On the ageuds are:
(l)academic standards , (2) student unrest, (3)
fin;mcial problems, (4) ~l:.ysical facilit!.es,
(S)counseling.
Place • • • • o
Time • • • • •
•••
o
o

Office of SLA (Service~Learning Agen~y)
Late the same spricg
�{rcenc 1V
cor.~i~ued)
q
Characte~s Present~ Irviu Core, Director, SLA
Leah Zonn, Assistant Director, SLA
Hiss Pellet·, ~~cretary ~ SLA
Iva Grant, EGADP (E,~mpi acy Grant AsGignments
Depat'tment)
Situation. o o • • o Contact3 have been made with SORTA, AoCU and
students secut·iog agreet'lsnt to cooi='~r-~te in a
service-learning project on body s_ze anci trans
portation. Fimds have been securei:I. Th<,, agre_e.,,
ments axe to be confir.n-<2d and a first meeting of
the p~oject participants is to be scheJul6d~
0
_
_...__.
.ACT
II
SERVICE-LEARNING IN AC'I'ION
Place • • •
o
Time •••
~
~ • • e SORTA Office
• • • • tA~G Sprt~g
Characters l½:'~3ent. M. T. Roads
O. L. McDonalJ
"Abe" Willing
Sit'Jationo
~
Place. • •
.. . .
o
•••
o.
Ray Le"1a·n t
Lea!1 Zon.1
Project participants a r e meeting as a project
corom:f. ttee to help thz i.1tern define his task
mor.e specifical l y and to discuss roles.
Professor Levant's Off ice
Time n • • • • • . " • Mid ... sumin~.r
Characters Presant • l<r.w t~vrrnt
Situa tion.
. .. .
...
~
"AbF.l" Willing
Inter.n is well into his project and he is diacussi~g
some of 1::i s observations and ideas with his r:ou1;.3elor o
Place . o •
• Service··· Learning Agency Office
Time • o • • o • • • I.ate Summer
Characte rs Pr esent •. Irvi-n Core
Leah Zonn
~
Sit uat ion • • • • • • Internships for t he su~er are al most ove r and
the office is reviet~i ~g the s i tl·.ation .
Place • • •• •• • o SORTA
Time o • • • • • • o Late Summer
Character s Present . M. T. Ro ads
�Page 3
Act rr - Scene IV, Cont i nued
o.
L. McDonald
"Abe" Willing
Ray Levant
Irvin Core
Sitaation • • • • • • With only a few weeks t o go, the project is
reviewing wi t h the intern his final steps and
the prnparation of his report. Discussion of
ccmmunity and educational issue s evolves.
ACT III
Follow-Up and Aftermath
Scene I .,. Atlanta Servic e-Learning Confer~"2££_
.
• • . • White House Motor Inn
.
.
. . • Now

C!taracters P:-esent
All of you
Situationo • • . • • The script from here on is yet
Place.
Tim-a
.
n
0
~
t o he written.
��THE ATLANTA SERVICE-LEARNING CONFERENCE
June - December, 1969
Atlanta, Georgia
This paper was devel oped from materials pre pared by William R. Ramsay of the Southern
Regional Education Board, by Dean Edward
Holmes of Emory University, by Sam Williams
of the Atlanta Urban Corps, by J. D. Kimmi ns
of the Peace Corps, by Donald J . Eberly of the
National Service Secretariat, and others .
�The Service-Learning Concept
To serve and to learn; these fundamental goals of our society are
ingrained in the American rhetoric.
But how to serve? and how to learn? An institutionalized, bureaucratized 20th Century America has effectively limited the answers to these
g_uestions. For "service to country" America legislatively reg_uires military duty only, which many of today's young people find morally questionable. For "learning" we have complex university systems with limited
ability to respond to the individual and with oftimes conservative views
of what is education and what is not.
However, considerable attention is currently being given to the role
of universities in service to society.- At one extreme, argwnents are
heard that community involvement by an academic institution threatens its
integrity and drains its resources. At the other end of the spectrum of
opinion is the view of the university as a shaper of society with special
social responsibilities because of its objectivity, standards, and resources
of knowledge.
These arguments about campus-in-community may obscure fundamental
g_uestions of the role of the community as an educational resource. Can the
university perform its primary functions of education and the discovery of
new knowledge without an involvement in . society? Can educational institutions develop the type of ma npower needed by a r apidly changing society,
both as professionals a nd as citizens in a democracy, without including
th e r esourc es of soc ietal experience in the educational proces s ? How mi ght
community service, sought by many students, best be designed as a learning
experience and integrated with other aspects of a total educational pr ogr am?
Alternatives to traditional "service" and "learning " do indeed ex ist,
because America is vast and strives for freedom of individual expression.
Some universities and colleges, for example, bending to strong and some Q
t imes violent winds of change, support the creation of "free univers ities 11
on their campuses. But, heavy course loads and the "success" syndrome of
a hurr y-up mater ialistic soc i ety, do not do much to encourage the average
college student to pursue extra- curricular education that is unnecess ary
for a degree award.
Existing serv ice programs like Teacher Corps, VISTA, and Pea ce Corp s
attr act only a tiny percentage of college graduates , partly because the
time spent with these agencies is often constr ued a s a ltruistic "sacrif ice.
The fa ct is that our s ociety's definition of what is "practical , " mows
down idea l i s t by the hundr eds of thousands. Th e System per sua des many that
"volunteer" servi ce a nd educational exper i mentat i on is t o be undertaken at
p er s onal expe nse and r isk, a nd onl y rarely at the expense or r i sk of establ ished ins tituti ons .
1
11
�---- ---·- -
'
-- ·----·- - ·- - • • • sch,.:,ol 6-dministrators (mt,st) wake up to the
hea:.thy new needs of s·cuG.ent participation and
incorporate that activity into the learning process.
i
I
Il
I
President Richard M. Nixon
.,__________________Rad~-o~~dres_~- --o~ct~ber 17, __:-968_~!
A new approach is both necessary and possible. It reg_uires new meaning for "practicality," new openness to change, new commitment to experimentation, new acceptance of the ability of youth, and indeed new social
institutions and attitudes • • • to say nothing of competent human beings
who are prepared to function in the new society.
It is to search for these new attitudes and processes that the
Atlanta Service-Learning Comference is convened.
The Atlanta Service-Learning Conference
On April 30, 1969, at Atlanta University, students, faculty members
and agency officials met to discuss the feasibility of a proposal to convene a conference of six-months' duration, whose goal would be a thorough
study of the concept of service-learning in local application.
The participants voted to declare themselves the Atlanta ServiceLearni..rg Conference (ASLC), and to extend participant status to any agency,
organization, or individual whose interests or activities have a bearing
on the components of service-learning programs, or who have interests in
the successful outcome of a local experiment in service-learning.
To dat e , students, tea chers, administrator s, educationa l ins titut i ons,
federal, regional, and local government agencies, and diverse other private
and public agencies and institutions have indicated an active, working int erest in the ASLC.
,- ·----- Th~-~~ice of youth h~s served notice that satisfaction
can't be measured alone in dollars; that ther e is a need
f or serv i ce and contribution beyond the attainment of
material success. If these goals reg_uir e an i nvestment
in patience , t hen let us invest; if they reg_uir e money,
then let us spend.
t·--· ---·- ------ -·--··-----·· --··
Daniel Evans
Governor of Washington
Keynote Address t o 1968 Republ ican
Convention
Formally stat ed, the Conf erence is convened t o combine the resources
ot institutions and agencies concerned with the relationship between ser v ice experience and education, to explore and dev elop a conceptual framework and practical model for service-l earning programs f or univers i ties
2
lj~
I
l
I
I
II
!
t
'
�and communities, and to provide a structure for reflection and exchange
a.:nong various local community and education programs during a six-month
period (June-December, 1969.) Careful study combined with actual invoLvement in service-learning programs should result in a comprehensive picture
and plans for service-learning in communities and on campuses. To assist
t.he participants in their study, several methods will be employed:
I.
Work Groups
The Conference will function primarily through work groups, each
undertaking to explore in depth and to produce a report on one assigned
function of the concept of service-learning. Work groups will meet in
individual sessions, subject to the Chairman 1 s call. The several components
of a service-learning program, as identified by the Conference and assigned
as work-group top±cs, uith some questions for their consideration, are:
1.
A Service Work Group
What should be the size of the service rendered, in comparison
with societal needs?
What criteria defines relevant service?
What service do students perform and wish to perform?
What service can agencies accept?
How long should service last? (summer, one term, full year or
longer?)
What kinds of agencies can accept youth in service? (Hospitals,
Social Welfare, Educational, Religious, Governmental)
Should service be full-time or part-time?
2.
A Learning Work Group
Can learning take place in roles which students consider socially
irrelevant?
How can students be helped to grasp the broader implications o~
what they learn by serving?
What relationship exists between individual student goals and the ,
chose of alternative service opportunities?
How can students be helped to raise the important, relevant
questions about their service experiences?
How· can interested, knowledgeable, and accessible faculty be
identified and enlisted in the service-learning experience?
What implications of experience-based learning are pertinent to
higher education in general?
How, in fact, do students learn from experience? How can it be.
measured?
How can community needs, student interests, and university programs interact to yield significant learning on the part of
everyone involved?
What methods and techniques are most effective in preparing
students for their job and community roles?
3
�3.
A Curriculum and I nter-Institutional Work Gr oup
What courses now exist which are relevant to service-learning
programs as training for other forms of service?
What inter-institutional relations now exist which could be
utilized and developed for internships and program development ?
·what effects will the service-learning e:>q)erience have on student
expectations in the curriculum area?
'What effect on independent study or directed research?
What will be accredited and how much credit will be given and
asked?
Will this req_uire cross-crediting among institutions?
4.
A Research Work Group
·what is the tota l need for student manpower i n Atlanta?
What is the total student manpower potential in Atlant a?
Under what conditions could this manpower resource be tapped
for the benefit of everyone concerned?
What changes in student attitudes occur during a servicelearning experience?
5. A Financial Work Gr oup
In funding service-learning programs, what share should be borne
by the agency being served? by the student of educational
institution? by the government ?
How should the Atlanta Urban Corps be financed in the future?
What proporti on of Work-Study f unds should be spent on off -campu;:;
ser vice a ctiviti es?
6.
A Methods and Programs Work Group
What methods are used by other intern agencies in the nat i on?
What are the r elevant pr ograms , propos ed and developed, within
and without t he Atl anta area, t hat t h e Confer ence should know
about?
In what ways should t h e Conference rel ate to other s uch programs ?
Work groups will marshal l available res ources, i mplement i deas and concepts, guide t he progress of t he Conference, coor dinat e i t s operations,
study i t s conponent concerns, and make recommendations based upon their
study a nd observations toward the creation of a comprehensive model f or a
continuing s ervice-learning operation in Atlanta.
II.
Mont hl y Meetings of the Conference
Monthly sessions of the ent ire Conference wi l l
of which one or more of the component concerns will
Each wor k group will have an opportunity to chair a
ference, and guide t h e discussion as it sees fit t o
4
be convened, at each
be the topic of study .
session of the Confoc us the att ent ion of
�t he entire Conference on its particular component of service-learning.
Ea ch work group will organize its assigned session, calling in whatever
additional resource people are needed to explore completely the topic
of i t s concern. The schedule for subsequent sessions of the Conference
is as follows:
Early August
Late August
September
October
November
Service Work Group
Learning Work Group
Curriculum Work Group
Finance Work Group
Research, Methods and
Programs Work Groups
Steering Committee
December
All persons attending the June 30 meeting are invited to select a
work group in which to participate. Sign-up sheets are to be available
i n the June 30 afternoon seminars. The first work group meetings will
be held at 11:00 AM on July 1.
III.
A Practical Laboratory
Coincident with the launching of the Conference is the creation of the
Atlanta Urban Corps, a group of 215 students serving full-time throughout
t l::e s ummer with 16 city and 32 private non-profit organizations in Atlant a .
Most Urban Corps members are funded on the basis of 8Cfl/o from the federal
College Work-Study Program and 2oo/o from the employing agency. The Southern
Regional Education Board under grants from the Economic Development Admini ~: t r ation, O.ffice of Economic Opportunity and Department of l a bor is providi ng
support along with Atlanta businessmen and foundations to cover administrative costs a nd stipends for interns not eligible f or the Work -Study Pr ogram .
VISTA ha s as s igned 25 associate positions to operate under Urban Corps
auspices.
l
~
I
- --- -- - - - ·
I
l
"The Urban Corps is the best example I've seen for young
intelligent minds to gr apple with the problems of the
city ."
t__ _____
~
~ yor Ivan Allen, Jr.____
__ _ _
Sam Wil liams , direct or of t he At lanta Urban Corps, points to the rele vance of the educational a sp ect of t he pr ogram as he des cribes t he educa t ional eva luat ion t eam whi ch is a part of h is t wenty-member staff. Nine
s t aff memb ers make up the evaluation t eam which is resp ons i bl e f or develop -:ing and assuring educationa l dimension of each i nter n 1 s summer as signment o
Five profes s ors serve as counselors to l end technical and educational
assistance to individual i nterns and groups of int erns, and wit h one pro fess ional and three student staff members in the offi ce plan seminars and
coordinate other means of hel ping the interns make their s ummer wor k exper i ences educationally relevant. Each student will be r equired to pr es ent
to the Ur ban Corps a r eport on his inter nship at the completion of his
servi ce per i od .
5
j
J
�Thus, the Urban Corps, in addition to accomplishing needed tasks in
the community and offering both a summer job and a relevant educational
experience to its members, provides a practical service-learning laboratory for the Conference. Through observation of the Urban Corps and participation of its members, the Conference is assured the necessary dialogue
between theory and practice.
A steering committee, composed of work group chai:rmen and other
conveners of the Conference, has been formed to provide direction for
Conference activities and to maintain a balance among the componentsof
the service-learning concept. The motivation for convening the Conferenc,~
combines an enlightened self-interest with an appreciation of the -broader
potential of the service-learning idea.
For examples, agencies are interested in competent manpower to do
their tasks. They are also searching for potential career employees.
Students are seeking experience and financial aid. Educational institutions are seeking to improve the education offered to students, to make
it more relevant, and to identify useful career possibilities for students.
By means of a service-learning program, it is hoped that these and other
objectives can be more fully met than if each were pursued in isolation.
Sponsors of the Conference include the following organizations:
The City of Atlanta
The Atlanta Urban Corps
Economic Opportunity Atlanta
The Colleges and Universities of Atlanta
Department of Health, Education and Uelfare
The Southern Regional Education Board
Volunteers in Service to Ameri ca
The Peace Corps
Further information on the Conference may be obtained fr:·m the sponsoring agency officials identified in the program and from wo1.0:-;: group
chairmen. The mailing address of the Conference is:
Atlanta Service-Learning Conference
Peace Corps , Southern Region, Ste. B-70
275 Peachtree Street, N. E.
Atlanta, Georgia 30303
6
�THE ATLANTA SERVICE-LEARNING CONFERENCE
June - December, J969
Atlanta, Georgia
This paper was developed from materials prepared by William R. Ramsay of the Southern
Regional Education Board, by Dean Edward
Holmes of Emory University, by Sam Williams
of the Atlanta Urban Corps, by J. D. Kimmins
of the Peace Corps, by Donald J. Eberly of the
National Service Secretariat, and others.
�The Service-Learning Concept
To serve and to learnj these fundamental goals of our society are
ingrained in the American rhetoric.
But how to serve? and how to learn? An institutionalized, bureaucratized 20th Century America has effectively limited the answers to these
questions. For "service to country" America legislatively requires mili tary duty only, which many of today's young people find morally questionable. For "learning" we have complex university systems with limited
ability to respond to the individual and with oftimes conservative views
of what is education and what is not.
However, considerable attention is currently being given to the role
of universities in service to society. At one extreme, arguments are
heard that community involvement by an academic institution threatens its
integrity and drains its resources. At the other end of the spectrum of
opinion is the view of the university as a shaper of society with special
social responsibilities because of its objectivity, standards, and resources
of knowledge.
These arguments about campus-in-community may obscure fundamental
questions of the role of the community as an educational resource. Can the
university perform its primary functions of education and the discovery of
new knowledge without an involvement in s ociety? Can educational instit utions develop the type of manpower needed by a rapidly changing society,
both as professiona ls a nd as citizens in a democra cy, without including
t h e r esources of societal experience in the educat i onal process ? How might
community service, sought by many students, best be designed as a learning
experience and integrated with other aspects of a total educational pr ogr am?
Alternatives to traditiona l "service" a nd "learning " do indeed exist ,
beca use Amer ica is va st and strives f or f r e edom of indivi dua l expr es s i on .
Some uni ver s ities a nd colleges, f or example, b ending to strong and s ome~
times v iol e nt winds of cha nge , s uppor t t he creation of "free universities "
on their campuses. But, heavy course loads and the "success" syndrome of
a hurr y-up materialistic soci ety, do not do much to encourage the average
college student to pursue ext ra-curr icular educat i on that is unnecessary
f or a degree award .
Exist ing service programs l ike Teacher Corps, VISTA, a nd Peace Corps
a ttract only a t iny per centage of college graduates , partly be ca use the
time spe nt with thes e a genc ies i s often const r ued a s a ltruis tic "sacri f i ce. "
The fact is t h at our society' s definition of wh at is "practical, " mows
down idealist by the hundreds of t ho usands. The System persuades many that
"volunteer " serv i ce and educationa l experimentation is to b e undertaken at
personal expense and risk, and onl.v rarely at the expense or risk of est ablished institutions.
1
�mL~;:;)-,~~l~~-:;-t-~--~~e·· ·----
I - ----~---. - ,-- ;cb:1)01
administrators -(
hea:i.tty new needs of s·;.;uC:.ent :participation and
incorporate that activity into the learning process.
President Richard M. Nixon
i
Radio
address
of
October
17,
1968
·-·- --· -- - -··-·-- - - - -- --·-- --- - -
______________
.,__
1
1
A new approach is both necessary and possible, It requires new meaning for 11practicality," new openness to change, new commitment to experimentation, new acceptance of the ability of youth, and indeed new social
institutions and attitudes. • • to say nothing of competent human beings
who are prepared to function in the new society.
It is to search for these new attitudes and processes that the
Atlanta Service-Learning Comference is convened.
The Atlanta Service-Learning Conference
On April 30, 1969, at Atlanta University, students, faculty members
and agency officials met to discuss the f easibility of a proposal to convene a conference of six -months' duration, whose goal would be a thorough
study of the concept of servi ce-learning in local appli cation.
The participants voted to declare themselves the Atlanta ServiceLearni..rg Conference (ASLC), and to extend participant stat us to any agency,
organization, or individual whose interests or activit i es have a bearing
on the components of service-learning programs, or who have interests in
the successful outcome of a loca l experiment in ser vice -learning .
To date, s tudents , teachers, a dmi nistrators , educational inst itut ions,
f ederal, regional, and local government agencies, and diverse other private
and public agencies and i nsti tutions have indicated an a ctive, working i nterest i n t h e ASLC.
······ - - - ... ---· -· . ··- ·- --,.. ___... -·--- - ·-- ----- -------···- ~___ _________ _____ _
..,. _
_ ____
The voi ce of J'outh has ser ved not ice that sat i s faction
ca n' t be measured alone in dollars; that there is a need
f or service and contribut ion beyond the at tainment of
I
mater ial success. I f these goals r equir e an investment
l
i n patience, then let us i nvest ; i f they r equir e money,
1
1
then let us spend.
I
i
I
,- ·--·- - - --------
- ··- -- -··· . ....
Daniel Evans
Governor of Washington
Keynote Address to 1968 Republican
Convention
..•
.
....
Formally stat ed, the Conference is convened to combine the resoQ~ces
of institutions and agencies concerned with the relationship between service experience and education, to explore and develop a conceptual framework and practical model for service-learning programs for universities
2
II
II
'
�a nd com.~unities, and to provide a structure for reflection and exc~ange
8,.::J.(mg various local community and education programs during a six-month
period (June-December, 1969.) Careful study combined with actual involver.;.ent in service-learning programs should result in a comprehensive picture
and plans for service-learning in communities and on campuses. To assist
the participants in their study, several methods will be employed:
I.
Work Groups
The Conference will function primarily through work groups, each
undertaking to explore in depth and to produce a report on one assigned
function of the concept of service-learning. Work groups will meet in
individual sessions, subject to the Chairman 1 s call. The several compcnents
of a service-learning program, as identified by the Conference and assigned
as work-group top±cs, ,rith some q_uestions for their consideration, are~
1.
A Service Work Group
What should be the size of the service rendered, in comparison
with societal needs?
What criteria defines relevant service?
What service do students perform and wish to perform?
What service can agencies accept?
How long should service last? (summer, one term, full year or
longer?)
What kinds of agencies can accept youth in service? (Hospitals,
Social Welfare, Educational, Religious, Governmental)
Should service be full-time or part-time?
2.
A Learning Work Group
Can learning take place in roles which students consider socially
irrelevant?
How can students be helped to grasp the broader implications of
what they learn by serving?
What relationship exists between individual student goals and the ,
chose of alternative service opportunities?
How can students be helped to raise the important, relevant
q_uestions about their service experiences?
How can interested, knowledgeable, and accessible faculty be
identified and enlisted in the service-learning experience ?
What implications of experience-based learning are pertinent to
higher education in general?
How, in fact, do students learn from experience ? How can it be .
measured?
How can community needs, student interests, and university programs interact to yield signif ica nt learning on the part of
everyone involved?
What methods and techniq_ues are most eff ective in pr eparing
students for their job and community r oles ?
3
�3.
A Curriculum and I nter-Institutional Work Gr oup
What courses now exist which are relevant to service-learning
programs as training for other forms of s ervice?
What inter-institutional relations nm-r exist which could be
utilized and developed for internships and program develop.rr:Brit?
What effects will the service-lear ning experience have on student
expectations in t he curriculum area?
·what effect on independent study or directed research ?
What will be accredi ted and how much credit will be given and
a sked?
Will this req_uire cross-crediting among institutions?
4.
A Research Work Group
What i s t he t otal need for student manpower in Atlanta ?
What is the total student manpower potential in Atla nta?
Under what conditions could this manpower r esource be tapped
for the benefit of everyone concerned?
What changes in student attitudes occur during a servicelearni ng experience ?
5. A Fi nanc i al Work Gr oup
In f unding service-learning programs , what share should be borne
by the agency being served? by the student of educational
institution? by the government ?
How should the Atlant a Urban Corps be financed in the f ut ure?
Wha t proportion of Work-Study f unds should be spent on off-campu:::;
service activities ?
6. A Methods and Programs Work Gr oup
What methods are used by other intern agencies i n the nation?
What are t he rel eva nt pr ograms , proposed and developed, with in
and without t he Atl anta area, that t he Conference should know
about ?
In what ways should the Conference relat e to other such programs?
Work groups will marshall available resources , i mplement i deas and concepts, guide the progress of t he Conference, coor dinate i t s operations ,
st;1dy its conponent concerns , and make r ecommendati ons based upon thei r
study and observat i ons toward t he creation of a comprehensive model fo~ a.
continuing service- l earni ng operation i n Atlanta .
II .
Mont hly Meetings of the Conference
Mont hl y sess i ons of t he entire Conference will
of which one or more of the component concerns will
Each work group wi l l have an oppor tunity t o chair a
ference, and guide t he discussion as it sees f it to
4
be convened, at each
be t he topi c of study.
session of t he Confocus the attention of
�the entire Conference on its particular component of service-learning.
Each work group will organize its assigned session, calling in whatever
additional resource people are needed to explore completely the topic
of its concern. The schedule for subsequent sessions of the Conference
is as follows:
Early August
Late August
September
October
November
Service Work Group
Learning Work Group
Curriculum Work Group
Finance Work Group
Research, Methods and
Programs Work Groups
Steering Committee
December
All persons attending the June 30 meeting are invited to select a
work group in which to participate. Sign-up sheets are to be available
in the June 30 afternoon seminars. The first work group meetings will
be held at 11:00 Al~ on July 1.
III.
A Practical Laboratory
Coincident with the launching of the Conference is the creation of the
Atlanta Urban Corps, a group of 215 students serving full-time throughout
tt.e summer with 16 city and 32 private non-profit organizations in Atlanta.
Most Urban Corps members are funded on the basis of 8Cf'/o from the federal
College Work-Study Program and 2oo/o from the employing agency. The Southern
Regional Education Board under grants from the Economic Development Adminh:tration, Office of Economic Opportunity and Department of labor is providing
support along with Atlanta businessmen and foundations to cover administrative costs and stipends for interns not eligible for the Work-Study Program.
VISTA has assigned 25 associate positions to operate under Urban Corps
auspices.
j "- ·
l
,., _ ____ ., _
_
•.
- - - - · · - · -· ·
.
-·- - ·-
··~
-
-
_,.,
- - - - - - -· · - -
-- -
· - - - --
"The Urban Corps is the best example I've seen for young
intelligent minds to grapple with the problems of the
city."
L___
Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr.
__
_ , . . . _.,.,,_.. _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __
__ _ _ _ _ _
l
l
I
- - - - - - - - - - - - _j
Sam Williams, director of the Atlanta Urban Corps, points to the rele vance of the educational aspect of the program as he describes the educational evaluation team wh ich is a part of his t wenty-memb er staff. Nine
s taff members make up the evaluation team which is responsible for developing and assuring educational dimension of each intern's summer assignment.
Five professors serve as counselors to lend technical and educational
assistance to individual interns and groups of interns, and with one pro fessional and three student staff members in the office plan seminars and
coordinate other means of helping the interns make their summer work experiences educationally relevant. Each student will be r equired to present
to the Urban Corps a report on his internship at the completion of his
service period.
5
,
i
�Thus, the Urban Corps, in addition to accomplishing needed tasks in
the community and offering both a swnmer job and a relevant educational
experience to its members, provides a practical service-learning laboratory for the Conference. Through observation of the Urban Corps and participation of its members, the Conference is assured the necessary dialogue
between theory and practice.
A steering committee, composed of work group chai:rmen and other
conveners of the Conference, has been formed to provide direction for
Conference activities and to maintain a balance among the componentsof
the service-learning concept. The motivation for convening the Conferenc?.
combines an enlightened self-interest with an appreciation of the -broader
potential of the service-learning idea.
For examples, agencies are interested in competent manpower to do
their tasks. They are also searching for potential career employees.
Students are seeking experience and financial aid. Educational institutions are seeking to improve the education offered to students, to make
it more relevant, and to identify useful career possibilities for students.
By means of a service-learning program, it is hoped that these and other
objectives can be more fully met than if each were pursued in isolation.
Sponsors of the Conference include the following organizations:
The City of Atlanta
The Atlanta Urban Corps
Economic Opportunity Atlanta
The Colleges and Universities of Atlanta
Department of Health, Education and Welfare
The Southern Regional Education Board
Volunteers in Service to America
The Peace Corps
Further information on the Conference may be obtained fr:-m the sponsoring agency officials identified in the program and from i-ro)_":-;: group
chairmen. The mailing address of the Conference is:
Atlanta Service-Learning Conference
Peace Corps, Southern Region, Ste. B- 70
275 Peachtree Street) N. E.
Atlanta, Georgia 30303
6
�IN SERVICE-LEAWING PROGRAMS:
A PRELIMINARY REPORT
Dete1iniuing the degree to which area colleges and universities are invol·ted in service-lear.ning programs and ascertaining the attitudes of higher education students, faculty9 and
administrators toward community involve::ment constitute two of the
principal concerns of the Atlanta Service Learning Conference.
To
provide insight into these two areas of special interest, a mmber
of college students are currently in the process of completing a
survey of ten area col: eges and universities.
include;
The ten institutions
Agnes Scott College ~ Atlanta Universi ty, Clark College,
Emory Universi ty, Georgia State College, Georgia Tech, Morehouse
College, Morr i s Bro~m Coilege, Oglethorpe College, and Spelman
College.
As part of a br oader s t udy of student manpower resour ces,
this survey will seek ansuers to the f ollowi ng kinds of questions:
1.
To what extent does the invo i vement of higher education
inst itutions va-::y from campus to campus?
What factor s
account f or tr.e vari a tions?
2.
To what ex tent does the degr ee of ser v i ce- learni ng
a cti vities vary between different s chools and depar tments within particular institutions?
What a ccou.1t s for
the variations?
3.
\Jhat areas of community l ife mos t readi ly l end thems elves
to student involvement?
4.
What are the relative roles of students, faculty, and
administrative personnel in community development
activities?
5.
To what extent does existing curriculum encourage student involvement in the community1
Do s tudents require
academic credit for partici?ation in community activities?
6.
How important are community involvement programs to students, factlty 9 and administrators?
What do the terms
"community involvement" and "service-learning" suggest
to these three important clientele groups?
�7.
What areas of community concern presently receive
the greatest attention from higher education?
The
least concern?
8.
Do existing patterns of service-learning practices
suggest that some institutions can best serve by
specializing in particular programs?
It is expected that answers to the above questions will
be of value to ASLC for the following reasons:
1.
The research will identify both the forces facilitating and the forces inhibiting development of the service-learning concept,
2.
Cataloguing existing programs of community activities
can assist ASLC'.S role in coordinating service-learning
programs and directing students into programs most
suitable to their individual preferences.
3.
The research will mirror the present scope of servicelearning programs and i~entify areas of neglect.
4.
In the long run 9 certain priorities may be set and thereby assist ASLC in gaining the essential financial resources for funding service-learning programs in the areas
demanding the greatest concentration of community efforts.
�THE INVOLVEMEN'.r OF HIGHER ~DUCATf.UN
IN SERVICE-LEA..'lliING
PROGRAMS:
A PRELHH NARY REPORT
Determining the degree to which area colleges and universities are involved in service-lear n.ing programs and ascertaining the attitud1:s of higher educatj on studef!.ts s faculty 9 and
administrators toward community involvement constitute two of the
principal concerns of the Atlan!:a Service Lean1ing Conference.
To
provide insight into these two areas of special interest, a nur!lber _
of college students are currently in the process of completing a
survey of ten area colleges and universities.
include~
The ten institutions
Agnes Scott College , Atlanta University, Clark College,
Emory Dniversity, Georgia Sta te College, Georgia Tech, Morehouse
College, Morris Brown College, Oglethorpe College, and Spelman
College.
As part of a broader study of student manpower resources,
this survey will seek ansuers to the followi ng kinds of questions:
1.
To what extent does the involvement of higher education
institutions va~y from campus to campus?
What factors
account for the variations?
2.
To what extent does the degree of servi.ce-learning
activities vary between different schools and departments within particular institut:f.ons?
What accounts for
the varia tions?
3.
\Jhat areas of community life most readily lend themselves
to student involvement?
4.
What are the relative roles of students, faculty, and
administrative personnel i n community development
activities?
5.
To what extent does existing curriculum encourage stude~t involvement in the community?
Oo s tudents require
academic credit for participa~ion in community activities?
6.
How important are community involvement programs to students, faculty 9 and administrators?
What do the terms
"community involve!!l.ent 11 and "service- learning" suggest
to these three important clientele groups?
�7.
What areas of community concern presently receive
the greatest attention from higher education? ·The
least concern?
8.
Do e}dsting patterns of service-learning practices
suggest that some institutions can best serve by
specializing i n particular programs?
It is expected that answers to the above questions will
be of value to ASLC for the following reasons:
1.
The research will identify both the forces facilita· ting and the forces inhibiting development of the service-learning concept.
2.
Cataloguing existi ng pr ograms of communit y activities
can assist ASLC 9 S role in coordinating service-learning
progr ams and directing students i nt o progr ams mos t
suitable to their individual preferences ,
3.
The r es ear ch wi l l mi rror the present s cope of s ervicel earning pr ograms and i ~ent ify areas of neglec t.
4.
I n the l ong r un 9 cer t ain pr i orities may be set and t hereby assist ASLC in gaining the essential finan cial resources for funding service-l earning programs i n the areas
demanding the .greatest concentration of community efforts.
�June 25, 1969
Mr . Sam Williams
Atl nta Urban Corps Proj ct
Municipal Auditorium
Atl nta, Georgia 30303
Dear Sm:
Pl a
D vi
not th attached copy of letter to Director of Fin nc:
cone rning
vel e pen_ s foJ: Urb n Corps Enrolle s .
Charl
8
It is r que t d t _ t you provid m with
nroll
who
will b r questing r imbur m nt for thi purpo
nd, 1 o, n atim t
of the numb r of mil
that will be driv n both monthly nd in total for
th -b n.i .fit of th Ur - n Corp• Proj ct.
V ry truly your
G or
J. B rry
Admini tn.tiv Coordinator
OBJ!p
At chment
be: Charles L. qavis
Dan Sweat /
Johnny Robinson
�June 23, 1969
)1r.,
e Dasb
Qe(>rgia · cb BoX
Atlant , r;ecira-iLn
34402
�Mr .. BU1 Mems
Si
N\1 Fra.t nity ·
Fowl
~~-t
Atlant , Georgia
Bill :


ph



�COLLEGE
NAME
AGENCY
RATE
80%
20%
100%
L. D. Ale;x:ander
Clark College
NeKalb/Decatu.r YMCA
$1. 80
CWSP
Agency
Melvin Almond
DeKalb College
City-Traffic Engineering
$1. 80
CWSP
Agency
Phyllis Atkins
Georgia State
Wheat Street
$2.20
CWSP
~one-,(?)
Franklin Benefield
Emory University
City -Sanitation
$2.50
Agency
Edwin M. Barrett
Morehous e College
Ga. State Employ Ser
$2 .20
VISTA
Maria..YJ.ne · T. Boder
Georgia Tech
City-Finance Dept
$2.20
AGENCY
Jane Bridges
Georg9a State
City - Public Library
$2, 50
James M. Bruce ~
Emory University
City -Mayor ' s Office
$2 .50
Vista
Steve Chandler
Florida Presby.
Fulton Connty Health
$1. 80
Vi sta
. Clark College
City -Planning Dept .
$2. 20
CWSP
Agency
Georgia Tech
City-Mayor's Office
$2 ,50
CWSP
Agency
Walter Collier
Geergia State
City -Aviation
$1.80
Agency
Nancy Corcoran
Emory University
Emroy-Legal Aid
$2 ,50
Vista
.
Inmond Deen
Tulane University
Atlanta Urban Corps
$2 ,50
Urban Corps
Daniel Dragalin
(G)eorgia Tech .
City-Water Dept
$2.20
CWSP
Agency
Walter Driver
Clark College
Community Arts, Inc.
$2.20
CWSP
AY5;
Peggy Durrah
Georga State
City-Parks Dept
$1.80
CWSP
Agency
Janes Elman
~)
Thomas Fleming
Vanderbilt Univ.
City-Sanitation
$2. 50
Agency
Georgi a State
City-Mayors Office
$2,50
Vista
Michael Floyd
Morehouse
City-Parks Dept
$2.EO
CWSP
Agency
Gr a.'119.Z e Fretwell
Clark College
Atl. Youth Council
$2 . 20
CWSP
Agency
Beverly J. Gaither
Georgia State ·
Fulton County Health
$1.80
CWSP
Agency
Mar garet Gerber
Emroy University
Atlanta Urban Corps
$2 . 50
Charles Choice
Dan Christianberry
@_
~
AUC
AUL
Agency
Vista
�Page 2
COLLEGE
NAME
AGENCY
RATE
80%
20%
100%
Frank S. Goodson
Univ. of Ga.
City-Public Workds
$2.20
Agency
David M. Harvey
Emory Univ.
City-Finance Dept.
$2,50
Agency
Tony Hatcher
Ga. Tech
City-Public Works
$2.20
CWSP
Agency
Janic.e Herring
Clark College
City-Public Library
$2.20
CWSP
.Agency
Iris Hightower
Clark College
Community Arts, Inc.
$2.20
Urban Corps
Freddye Hill
Northwestern Univ
Ernmeys House
$2.50
Vista
Joan
Hollenbach
Emory Law School
City-Attorney's Office
$2.50
John
Hotard
Univ of Ga.
City-Sanitation
$2.20
.Agency
Lydia H. Howard
Spelman
Literacy Action Found.
$2.50
Vista
Dorothy Hump"l~y
Morris Brown
YWCA
$1.80
Martha Irby
Emory University
City-Finance
$2.20
Rudolph Jefferson
Morris Brown
Mennonite House
$2.20
CWSP
.Agency
·Arion Kennedy
Morehouse
Rent-a-Kid
$1.80
CWSP
Agency
Rita Kirshstein
Emory
Fulton County Health
$2.20
Diane Lewis
Spelman
Atlanta Girls Club
$1.80
CWSP
.Agency .
Marj orina Langford
Georgia State
Urban C rps Staff
$1.80
CWSP
Agency
Cathleen Liang
Atlanta Univ.
City-Finance
$2.50
Andrea Luce
Randolph-Macon
Decatur/ DeKalb YMCA
$Jii::80
AUC
Agency
Robett Izynes
West Gerogia
City-Water Works
$2.20
CWSP
.Agency
Cynthia Knight
Clark College
Wheat Street Bapt.
$2.20
CWSP
AlIC*
West Georgia
Rent -a-Kid
$2.20
CWSP
.Agency
John
(__:y')
Mann
u
14.UC
CWSP
Agency
Agency
.Agency
.Agency
Agency
�l
Page 3
COLLEGE
Oglethorpe College
AGENCY
City-Mayor's Office
RATE
$2-20
80%
CWSP
20%
Agency
Emmett McCord
DeKalb Junior
Rent-a-Kid
$1.80
CWSP
Agency
Albertine Mccrary
Georgia State
Rity-Atl. Public Lib.
$1.80 .
CWSP
Agency
Eddie McMichael
Morehouse
Community Arts, Inc.
$2.20
CWSP
143.215.248.55*
Alan Miller
Ga, Tech
Kennesaw Park
$2, 20
Addie Mitchell
Morris Brown
Wheat Street Bpt.
$2.20
CWSP
AUC
Jesse Moore
Morehouse
American Cancer Society
$2.20
CWSP
Agency
James A. Mulligan
Emory University
Fulton County Health
$2.50
Harold R. Nash
!B'erogaii Tech
~ity-Treffic Enginner.
$2.20
Nancy A. Norbert
Emroy Univ.
City-Parks & Ree-Kenn.
$2.50
Richard Padgett
Brown Univ.
Atl. Youth Council
$1.80
CWSP
Agency
Delbeet Paul
Georgia Tech
Whaat Street Bapt.
$2.20
CWSP
AUC
Betty Peters
Clark College
Literacy Action Found.
$2.20
CWSP
Agency
Linda Robinson
Georgaa State
Wheat Street Bapt.
$2.20
CWSP
AUC
Leon Scandrick
DeKalb Junior
Rent-a-Kid
$L8o ·,
CWSP
Agency
Teia Sinkfield
Spelamn
Youth Coun·c il
$2.20
CWSP
Agency ·
Bartow Snooks
Emory
City-Sanitation
$2.20
Agency
Ruth Simmons
Emory
City-Parks & Rec -Kenn .
$2 . 20
Agency
Valendia Spaulding
Brandeis
Rent-a-Kid
$L 80
Paul Stansbury
Ga . Tech
City- Sa.nitat ion
$2 . 20
J ulius Stephens
Mor ehouse
City- Parks & Rec .
$2 . 20
Margaret Swart sel.
Agnes Scott
Urban Corps Staff
$2 . 50
NAME
JosJ?ph Menez
Cg)
0
100%
Vista





Agency
CWSP
Agency
Agency
CWSP







Agency
Agency
CWSP
Agency
AUC
�r
Page 4
-COLLEGE
NAME
AGENCY
RATE
801&
20%
109%
Charles S.. Thomas
DeKalb Junior
Conmrunity Council
$L80
CWSP
Agency
Jerry Thompson
Emory
Family Counseling Center
$2.20
,_AUC .
Agency
Larry TilleF
West Ga.
Rent-a-Kid
$1.80
CWSP
Agency
Randall Tony
Ga. State
City-Sanitation
$2.20
Valerie Tomlinson
DeKalb Jnnior
YWCA-Phyllis Wheatley
$1.80
Willia.'11 Travis
Ga. St(3.te
City=Sanitat ion
$2.20
Agency
Sally Tucker
Agnes Scott
City-Parks & Rec-Kenn.
$2.20
Agency
James Uffleman
Ga. Tech
Sity-Sanitation
$2.20
Agency
Bettye Underwood
Morris Brown
Urban Corps Staff
$2.20
CWSP
AUC
Patricia Watkins
DeKalb Junior
YWCA-Phyllis Wheatley
$L80
CWSP
AUC
Paula Whatley
Univ of Penn.
Fulton County Health
$2.20
CWSP
Agency
David Whelan
Harvard ·
Urban Corps Staff
$2.50
AUC
Benjamin White
UNC
Literacy Action Found.
$2.50
VISTA
Dawn White
Atlanta Univ.
Urban Corps Staff
$2.50
VISTA
James Wilcox
Ga. Tech
City-W a:t;er Dept.
$2.20
CWSP
Agenc¥
James Wilson
Ga. Tech
Rent-a-Kid
$2.20
CWSP
Agency
Rosalind Williams
Morris Brown
Gate City Day Nursery
$2 .20
CWSP
Agency
Michael Winston ;
West Georgia
City-Dept of Planning
$2.20
CWSP
Agency
Gary Wood
Mercer
Rent-a-Kid
$2.20
AUC
Agency
Ga . State
City-Mayors Office
$2.50
CWSP
Agency
Mary J. Woodward
lo
j
Agency
CWSP
AUC
'
i
II
�(Assigned)
Page 5
COLW-E
NAME
Rudine Arnold
.AGENCY
RATE
_80%
Spelman
Kirkwood Christain C.
$2.20
CWSP
Agency
West Ga.
Fulton County Health
$2.20
CWSP
Agency
Antioch
City_Mayors Office
$2.20
AUC
Agency
Macy Best
DeKalb Junior
Urban Lab In Education
$1.80
CWSP
AUC
Katherine Betsill
West Ga.
Decatur/NeKalb YMCW:
$1.80
CWSP
Agency
Solomon Berry, Jr.
Univ. of Ga.
Crime Commission
$2 .20
CWSP( via
SREB )
Agency
CWSP
Agency
Stanley Ball ~
Maney Berk q
t
/Ir'"
Carol Bonner
Clark College
Peace Corps Project
$2.20
Clifton Bostick
Ga. State
City -Sanitation
$2 .20
Regina Braxton
Morris Brown
Fulton County Health
$1.80
CWSP
Agency
Charles Brown
Ga. Tech
St. Vincent De Paul
$2.20
CWSP
Agency
Lucille Brown
West Ga.
Fulton County Healt h
$2.20
CWSP
Agency
Robert Brown
Mores house
City-Purhcasing Dpet .
$2 .20
CWSP
Agency
Sally Cantor
Lake Forest
Service Learning Conf.
$2.20
CWSP
AUC
Vivian Chandler
Morris Brown
Gate City Day Nursery
$2 .20
CWSP
Ageno-y
Roosevelt Childress
Clark College
City -Water Wor kds
$2 .20
CWSP
Agency
Margie Cohen
Morris Brown
City-Atl Public Lib.
$2.20
CWID'P
Agency
Br enda Comer
Mrl1Dris Brown
Atl. Girls Club
$2.20
CWSP
Agency
Diane Cousi neau
West Ga.
Fulton County Health
$2, 50
CWSP
Agency
Tom Cuffie
Morehouse
City-Atl.
$2.20
CWSP
Agency
Caretha Daniels
Ga. St ate
Grady Hospital
$2.20
Mary Daniels
Emory
Ki rkwood Christian
$2 .20
Public Li b .
Agency
AUC
CWSP
Agency
�Page
6
(assigned)
COLLEGE
NAME
AGENCY
---
80%
ao%
Calvin Davis
Morris Brown
City-Parks & IR.€c.
$l.8~
CWSP
Agency
Sylvia Dawson
Lake Forest
Atlanta Youth Council
$l.80
CWSP
Agency
Carolis Deal
Sewanee
Gate Cit;w- Nay Nursery
$2.20
CWSP
Agency
Imnond Deen
Tulane
Urban Corps Staff
$2.50
Peggy Dodson
Clark College
City-Atl.· Pub. Lib.
$2.20
Aue ·-
Agency
Alvin Dollar
Morehouse
Crime Commission
$2.20
CWSP
ll#!,ency
Pamela Dozier
Spelman
Ga. Easter Seil Soceity
$2.20
CWEP
Agency
Sara Erlick
Ml;. Holyoke
Atl. Service Learning
$2.20
Kenneth Fagen
Morehouse
City-Traffic Engin.
$2.20
CWSP
Agency
Mary Fagan
C~ark College
.American Cancer Soc.
$2.20
CWSP
Agency
City-Sanitat ion
$2.20
Southwestern
City~Comm. Rel. Comm.
$1.80
CWSP
Agency
Ga. Tech
City-Mayors Office
$2,50
AUC
Agency
Mary Freeman
Vassar
Decatur/DeKalb YMCA
$l.80
CWSP
Agency
Morris Friedman
Univ of Ga.
City-Water Dept.
$2.20
Robert Friend
Morehouse
Atlanta Youth Council
$2.20
CWSP
Agency
Mary Gordon
Agnes Scott
Community Council
$2.20
AUC
Agency
Katherin Hatcher
Ga. Tech
City-Water Dept.
$l.80
CWSP
Agency
Charles Haynes
Emroy
Street Theater
$2.20
AUC
Agency
Rose Haywood
Morris Brown
Atlanta Youth Council
$2.20
CWSP
Agency
David Henderson
Ga . Tech
City-Water Dept .
$2.20
CWSP
Agency
-·-
__


,


Frances Flowers
Janice Foster
~
·-- .... ~ ---~.
- Ga.' State
Gregory Faison
\\\tf
\
t..(
RATE!
---
100%
AUC
AUC
Agency
CWSP*
(see SREB)
.Aj!,ency
�Page ;g; 7
(assigned)
COLLEGE
NAME
-
20%
$2.20
CWSP
Agency
URBAN CORPS-$200
100%
Barbara Holland
Clark College
Urban Lab in Educ a.
VOL.
Michael Holland
Emory Univ.
City-Fi nance Dept.
$2.50
Jerry Howard
Morris Brown
City-Parks & Rec.
$2.20
M"ostofa Howeedy
Ga. Tech
City-Planning Dept.
$2.50
Agency
Thomas Hunt
Ga. Tech
Atl. Housing Conf.
$2.20
VISTA
JoAnn Ingle
Georgia College
Atlanta Youth Council
$2. 20
CWSP
Agency
Norman Ingram
West Georgia
City-Atlanta Pub. Lib
$2.20
CWSP
Agency
Oglethorpe
City-Mayors Office
$2.20
Margaret J accino
West Ga.
Fulton County Health
$1. 80
Barbara Kalvelage
Ga. State
Atlanta Setvice Learn.
$2.20
Allen Keck
Ga. Tech
Rent -a-Kid
$2.20
William Kemp
Ga. Tech
City-Water Dept.
$2 .50
Kathleen Kennedy
West Ga.
Fulton County Health
$1.80
CWSP
Agency
Stephen Kiemele
West Ga.
Fulton County Health
$1. 80
CWSP
Agency
Sohn King
Ga. Tech
Atlanta Youth Council


VOLUNTEER -


Maureen Kreger
Spelman
Fulton Count y Health
$2.20
VISTA
Paul S. Li
Ga. Tech
City-Sanitation
$2.50
Agency
Susie Lindsey
Ga. State
Atlanta Girls Club
$1.80
Gordon Lurie
Emory
Fulton County Health
$2.50
VISTA
Marvin Mangham
Morehouse
City-Fi nance Dept .
$2 . 50
Agency
Jon Marti n
Em.ray
City-Mayors Office
$2. 20
VISTA
llhoma.s Issac
V-
-~
,r
&
Rec
80%
West Georgia
.. .
City-Parks
RATE
Ernest Hendernon
I
/1....
AGENCY
Agency
CWSP
Agency
VISTA
CWSP
Agency
AUC
ffifSP
Agency
_ Agency
~r)J')--()~
AUC
Agency
�---,
Pagb 8
t
(assigned)
. .
- ·- -
.
800/o
NAME
Ralph Martin
COLLEGE
R!mory
AGENCY
National Welfare Rights
RATE
$l.80
VISTA
Jennifer Mauldin
Agnes Scott
Fulton County Health
$l.80
Agency
Anne Mayeaux
Emory
Family Counseling Center
$2.50
AUC
Agency
Fred McCord
DeKalb Junior
Decatur/DeKalb YMCA
$L80
CWSP
Agency
Morris Brown
eity-Parks & Rec.
$l.80
CWSP
Agency
Patricia McLaughlin
West Ga.
Atlanta Girls Club
$1.80
CWSP
Agency
Kenneth Millwood
Univ of Ga.
Urban Corps Staff
$2.50
Madie Moore
Spelman
City-Atl Public Lib.
$2.20.
Steve Mwamba
Ga. State
Urban Corps Staff
$2.20
AUC
Helen Newma...'1
Emory
Fulton County Health
$2.50
Vista
Shirley OWens
Ga. College
City- Atl. Public Lib.
$2.20
CWSP
Agency
William Patterson
Indiana Univ.
Atlanta Youth Council
$2.20
CWSP
Agency
Belinda Pennington
Morris Brown
Innnigration Dept.
$1.80
CWSP
Agency
John Petzelt
Ga. State
Ga. State Dept of Pshy.
$2.20
VISTA
Susan Pickard
Agens Scott
Kennesaw Mt.
$2.20
VISTA
Sanford Prate.Er
Morris Brown
Sara Murphy Homes
$2.20
James Rabb
Ga. Tech
City-Finance Dept.
$2.20
Rubye Render
Morris Brown
City-Parks & Rec.
$'.2.20
CWSP
Agency
Gene Roberts
Southwestern
Street Theater
$1.80
CWSP
Agency
Charlotte Robins on
DeKalb Junior
Gate City Day Nursery
$1.80
CWSP
Agency
RusseiH Rucker
DeKalb Junior
Kirkwood Christain
$1.80
CWSP
Agency
J ames Searc)
DeKalb Junior
Vine City Child Dev.
$1.80
CWSP
Agency
I
· Chester McElroy
Lz....
20%
moo%
AUC
CWSP
AUC
Agency
Agency
Agency
I
I
l
�-I
-,
Page! 9 (as signed)
COLLEGE
NAME
I
RATE
80%
20%
CWSP
Agency
· 100%
Leroy Shields
Yeshieva College
Ga. Easter Seal Soc.
$2.20
Michele Si l berstei n
Georga Rash. Univ.
Atl anta Yo~h Council
Volunteer -
Carroll Sinnnons
Mor ris Brown
Atlanta Girl s Club
$2.20
CWSP
Agency
Martha Simmons
Clark College
Atlanta Youth Council
$1. 80
AUC
Agency
Deborah Smal l
Mor ris Brown
Tonnigration Dept.
$1.80
CWS P
Agency
Ga . State
Street Theater
$2. 20
CWSP
Agency
Vdlrgini a Smtih
Spelman
Gate City Day Nursery
$2.20
CWSP
Agenct
Susan Strobhert
We st Georgia
Kirkwood Christian
$2.20
CWSP
Agency
Mary Strozier
Morris Brown
Vine City Chil d Dev .
$2.20
CWS P
Agency
Mi chael Stubblefield


Sore house


Street Theater
$2.20
AUC
Agency
Evans Studdi vmit
DeKalb Junior
Boy Scouts
$1. 80
CWSP
Agency
Const ance Thurman
We st Georgia ·
Grady Girl s Club
$2.20
CWSP
Agency
Donna Turner
West Georgia
Decatur/DeKalb YMCA
$2. 20
CWSP
Agency -
Val er i e Valera
Ga . St ate
Ga. State Dept of Ed Psy
$2,50
VISTA
Arthur von Keller
Emory
Emroy Legal Aid
$2.50
VISTA
Archlee Walla ce
Ga. Tech
City- Sanitation
$2 .20
Agency
John Walsh
~9-cy
City-Finance Dept .
$2.50
Agency
Eloise Warner
Morris Brown
Gate City Day nursery
$2 . 20
Carol Watkins
Agnes Scott
Fulton County Health
$2.20
Geneva Weaver
Sa . Tech
Gate City Day Nurs ery
$1.80
Elizabeth Whigham
Emory
Atlant a Housing Conf.
$2. 20
Chri stine Snuil.th
z'
AGENCY
..
-,
Agency- $200
CWSP
Agency
Agency
CWSP
Agency
Vi sta
�~
Page 10
(assigned)
-
NAME
COLLEGE
AGENCY
RATE
80%
20%
'
Eugen White
Ga. Tech
City-Water Dept.
$2.20
CWSP
Agency
Susan Windom
West Ga.
Fulton County Health
$2.~0
CWSP
Agency
Eulis Witcher
East Carolina
Fulton County Governt.
$2.50
AUC
Agency
Dorothy Wright
Clark College
City-Atlanta Public Lib.
$2.20
CWSP
Agency
Gunter Zietlow
Ga. tech
City-Avaition
$2.50
100%
Agency
1.
�r
PAGE 11
TENTATIVE PLACEMENT
College
NAME
.AGENCY
RATE
~
20%
100%
_,
!
Pamela Wilkes
Clark College
City-Parks & Rec.-Kenn
$L80
Agency
Richard de Mayo
Em.ory
City-Parks & Rec . -Kenn
$2 . 20
Agency
Burnley Bainbridge
Emroy
Atlanta Girls Club
VOL.
Sandra Mincey
Spelman
Wheat St r eet
$2. 20
Beverl y Grimes
DeKalb Junia,r
City-Bl anning
$1.80
CWSP
Agency
Clovia Wheeler
Morri s Brown
City - Purchasing
$2. 20
CWSP
Agency
Mary Hampton
DeKalb Junior
City - Parks & Rec
$1. 80
CWSP
Agency
Patricia Simms
Ga. College
Urban Lab in Education
$1 .80
CWSP
AUC
Richard Steele
Ga Tech
City -Water Dept
$2 . 20
Ruth Sistaire
Morri s Brown
Rent - a - Ki d
$1 .80
CWSP
Agency
J ame s Deiure s
Clark College
Atlanta Youth Council
$1.80
CWSP
Agency

Lloyd Sanders
Morehous e
Atl anta Youth Council
$2.20
CWSP
Agency
I
Morris Brown
City -Motor Transportation
$2 . 20
CWSP
Agency
Dor othy Hicks
\IA\
w~~ ,
Gc'-T__Q_~
W\-~i
~ -)0
Agency- $200
AUC
Agency
I
v t sr1t-
�June 26, 1969
Mr. Charles L . Davi
Dlrector of Finance
City of Atlanta
Atlanta, Georgi.
Dear Charles :
Prior to the time that th City took over sponsor hip of th U r ban Corps
Proj ct, the Urb n Corps Project D i J'ector r ach d a verbal agreement
with four students to pay them each $250 . 00 for th ir services in setting
up th Urban Corps Proj ct. They weee not to receiv any oth r compens tlon for their work such as the other enrollee
re .. These four tudents
w r :
Mr. Bill A dams
Mr. Dave Whelan
Mr. M rcua D sh
Mr. Rich Speer
B c u e of thi · pedal cbeumstanc r g rdi.ng the comp n ation of th ae
four individual , I dvi d Mr. S m ·uuam to h v th m ex cut som..e
writt n memor nda c rtUying th t th y did work durin thi
riod and for
Mr.
illiams to complete mlscell neou r quisitio.n for th .four ch cka.
The
docwnente relating to Mr. Adams and Mr. Whel n h ve been Lor ard d
to your office . Thos for
r. Dash nd Mr. Sp r ill follow hortly.
1 m c:ompletely aw r th t thi agrangement do • not conform to
cc pted w ys ot doing thing• for the City. W came upon the c ne
th !act, ho ev r.
d th ee gr emenh er
lr dy m d and tble
lndlvlduals h v already provided their a rvicee on th b d ol the gr m nt
th t wa• r ched. Fol' wh t v r lt is worth, it is my fttling that
can
properly cOJ1aider thes p ym nt• s coming lrom th proc ds of th prlvat
contribution th t hav
en mad4!t to th Urb n Corpe,.
It i ouY f eling that, u.o.d r the cbcumstancee, the• lnvolc s hould be
honor
and pald nd you ar requ st
to do o. W _ h v
dvbed t
_[
�M r. Davis
Page Two
June 26, 1969
Urban Corps Project Director that any future commitments of this nature
must be made through proper City procedure with the prescribed authorization.
Sincerel y your ,
Dan Sweat
Deputy Chief Administrator
DS :fy
cc: M r . Sam
7
illiams
�Mr. Charle s L. D9 vis
Direct or of Finance
City o f Atl.'3. na,
Atlanta, Ge orgia
Dear Charles:
Prior t o the time that the city took over sponsorshio of the
-Urbnn Corpi&s Project, the Urban Corps Pr o ject Director reached
a verj!>al agreement with four students t o pay them eAch $2~0.00
f or their services in setting up the Ymmtkxgm~mK Urban Corps
Project.
They were not to receive any other compensation for
their work such as the uther enrollees are.
These four students were:
Mr. Bill Adams
Mr. Dave Whelan
Mr. Marcus Dash
Mr. Rich Speer
Bec :>t.J.se of this spE'lcial circumstance re g grdin ~ the con,nensition
of these four indi viduals, I advised Mr. Sam Williams to have them
execute some written memoranda certifyin g that they did work du r i n~
this period and for Mr. Willi am s to compleee a miscell an eou s
requi s ition
for the four checks.
These do cume nts rel a tin ~ to
Mr. ~ H Ad ams and Mr . Whelan have been forwarden to your of f ic e .
Those f or Mr . Das h a nd Mr. Spe e r will follow sho r tly.
I am ~ompl e e e ly awa re th a t thi s arra n~ment
iKKWW
does not ~onform
to ge neral l y ao c ep tad wa ys of d oi ni? t hi n~s f or t he c ity .
~ o ~ a 1-e 1..,-v;,
~a->-> 12 Ill "',
'tie came upon t h e sc e ne after t he f ac t and these a~~eement.s were
'
a\u "4.'1. ?'("o"·' c!e J
already made and the se i ndividuals h a ve oon t rlbnted their services
Fo r
on the basis of the agreement that was reached .
/1
""h'4-te\lu i + i 5
wo...--\ h
It is my feelin,z
.,,
that we can properly conqider these payments as comin~ from the fo~e~J5
trt~
�pr iva te
/ contributions that have been made to the Ur ban Go-rp s . awi.txiran:
It is our feelin g that, under the circumst a nces , t hese in v oi~ e s
should be honored a nd p a id and you are reque 9 t ed to do so.
rJ'e have
advised the Ur ;~a n Corp s Proj e ct Director that any f ut u re commi t me nt s
o c' this nature must be made through proper city pro c ed u re with
the prescribed authori zation.
VTY
Da n Swe a t
Dep ut y 8hi ef Admi ni s t r 8 ti 11a orr t c~r
c c : Mr . S am Wi l l iamsm
�- - - - -- - ---·- --
ATI..ANTA UR.BAN CORPS STAFF
Sumner, 1969
1.
Executive Director ...••...••......• Sam Williams ..•••.•.•. 233-3652
2.
Executive Assistant .•••••••••.•••.• Sue Zander ••.•••..••.• 876-0915
3.
Director of Development •...••...••. David Whelan .••••••..• 378-3850
4~
Fiscal Director ••••• ; •••••••••..•.• Inmonl Deen •••••• ~ •••. 261-1192
5.
Director f or Special Projects .•••.. Dianne Wilson •..•••.•. 521-3827
6.
Payroll Coordinator •.•.••••.....•.• Steve Mwamba •••••.•••• 627-8837
7.
Payroll Coordinator •••••••.•.•••.•• Mac Rabb •••••••••••••• 875-1848
8.
Education & Evaluation Director •••• Resna namme r •••••••••. 872-6576
9.
Evaluation Staff ••••••••••••••••••• Maggie Gerber ••••••••• 522-7029
10.
Evaluation Staff •••••••••••••.•••.. Dawn White •••••••••••• 522-2464
11.
Evaluation Staff •••••••••.••••••••• Tim Rogers •.••• •• ••••• 876-7779
12.
Public Relations Director ••..••.••. Ken Millwood •.•..••••• 428-4668
13.
Public Relations Staff ••••••••••••• Tara Swartsel ••••••••• 634-6864
14.
Secretary •••••••••••••••••••••••••• Bettye Underwood ••••••
15.
Secretary ••••••••••••••.••••••••.•• Patty Harwell ••••••••• 758-2477
16.
Receptionist ••••••••••.•.•••••••••• Diane Lo·--1ejoy •••.•.••• 758-7741
Interns Assigned to the Urban Corps Staff
17.
Atlanta Service Learning Conference ••••••••••• .•••••• Babs Kalvelage •••• 634-g957
or
634;,,8069
18.
Atlanta Service Learning Conference ••••••••••.•••••• Melinda Lawrence •. 523-4597
19.
Atlanta Service Learning Conference •••••••.•••••••••• Kytle Frye ••••••.. 636-3877
20.
Atlanta Service Learning Conference(at SREB) •••••••• Sally Cantor •••••• 876-2927
�b ee: DM!'. George Berry
Mr. Sam Williams
June 25., 1969
M r~. Ch rles L . Davi
Dir ctor of Finance
City of tlanta
.A tlant , Georgia
De r Charle :
Ao. unanticipat d · x n e i m baa r! n ill connection ith th Urban
Corpe Project. No bud et provi ion
s m d for travel expens
in
coAnection ith any of th
nrolle •
o t of them r
ngag din duties
hich do not r wr trav ·l. How . v r .
r l tively amall numb r
v
hich do
requir th u
o! their p r on
b n a ign d to or
v hicle. Ex mpl
are those in the Mayor 1 a Offic assign d s
Community Servlc Coordi.n tor in th EOA Cent r and , 1 o, tho
on the Urban Corps at ff
t r r quired to tr
1 to th variou
or
tions to in rvic s upervisors,. t k c re of compl
t , nd p rfo
.
the v uation functioll.,
ho, ther i a probl m,, ·
find , in tr nsportin.g
th payroll record from the v riou
ork station• to d from the c ntzal
p yroll unit 1n City H I.
b
praetical to
llo a.nee
Uyinv
0
t
t ther
r
ir car
to • cur a •i ed
Corpe bu.•ln••• l
mle cellaneous
di 1
Uy
ho u e t

inc r ly -yo



fy


r

�- - - - - --- -- - -
�--


-


_? r-y _
-- ________ y _
f _ __
·-be_; ~
tAJd/tw~J
-
-~ _-___G_.;~ _----~~:--~
___,_
-
-
.
---
-
-- - - - - ~-- -
-
-
�----------
MEMORANDUM
TO:
. FROM:
Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr •
Sam Willia.ms
SUBJECT:
Sp
DATE:
~
ch to th Atlanta.
rvic -
June
19, 1969
a.rning Conf r nee
Tba.nk you for e.gre ing to a.ddr sa the initi
m eting of th- Atl ta
S .rvic -_uc::ca..,.-uing Cont r nc , Jun 30 at t
Whit Hous Motor Inn, 30
Houston Str at.
As w discuss d; all 225 U tan Coi'!)s int rns Will b . in attendanc& as


111. aa r p s rxtatives of' loe l coUeg s, busino s s, a.rid government


ae nci s. W also
ot out ... of-tawn r pr a nte.tives of s ·. rvtce progr
sue:µ
ac Corps, VTSTA, Tac rs Corps, o.nd others.
Sp a.kors for th · two ~ confer nc inelu
Clark Co,..__.,.,.., St.Udent Body Pr sident, Peac
ta.ft mb rs,
th
of


t 9 
00 .m., Jun 30. I


to,-.,,.,,.,. 1 og
nts you might co i r ppropriat
grO\lI)
(:O
�NATIONAL
DEVELOP M ENT
OFFICE
250 BROADWAY
.NEW Y O RK, N. Y, 10007
Revision of College Work.Study
Brog~ Manual
The U. S. Office of Education has issued a set of new pa.sea fof
the 1968 College Work-Study Program Mn.nual, replacing those _ae~~
which have been affected by the 1968 Higher Education Ame11dmont• and
the new College Work-Study Program. Regulations (45 CFR 175), copl.e •
of which were recently distributed.
We direct your ttention to the new Section 104 (D) (2) whlch
atlffu.a the institutional maintenance of effort requirement. The uae
~ CWSP funds mu.at. a.a of July 1, 1969, be used to expand an matltutlon• • financial aid program.
The reviaed Section 607 seta forth more detailed lnformaUon
on pro1ram audit procedures. Where the Urban Corpa ia the fi•cal
aaent fo~ the parti.c ipating college•, it i• auageated that a copy of the
official Audit Guidea be obtained from the appropriate Regional Auditor
•• aoted at the end ol Section 607.
The reviaed "Model Off-Campua Agreement" include• qyeral
,ec:tiona which clarify the position of &11 Urban Corps a• the em ..
ployer and paymaster. Thi• form of agreement may be uaed interchan1eably wlth that recommended in tbe Urban Corp• Natlaaal Oevelopment Office report on 11 Urban Corpa-Colle1e Contractual Arraaaemeata (Doc. No. 3).
llew
Additional copiea of the CWSP Malla.al aAcl the lle1uatlcm• may
be obtained upon reque•t from thia office or directly from the Colle1e
Wol'k-Study Proaram Branch, Bureau of Hl1ber Education, U.S. Office
of Education, Waahblpon, D. c. 20202.
�SUPPLEMENT #1 (May 1969) to the
C®L~~
W mt
-TlUDY
Plm GnR.A\MI
O
MANUAL, 9
Materials in th i s supplement i nc l ude:
(1)
Replacement page s fo r Page s 1- 3, 6-3, and 6- 7.
(2)
Rep lacement f or Appendix 1 - Legislation.
(3)
New Material. Appendix 2 - Col l ege Work-Study Program
Regulations as pr inted in t he May 13, 1969 Federal
Register.
(4)
New Materialo
Appendix 7 - Model Off-Campus Agreement Form.
!
�D.
Fulfillment of Financial Requirements of Participation
An institution participating in the College Work-Study Program
should be fully aware of the following financial responsibilities
which it accepts upon entering the program.
1.
Effective August 20, 1968, the law provides that the
Federal share of the compensation of students employed
in the College Work-Study Program cannot exceed 80%,
except that in certain circumstances to be established
by regulation,a Federal share in excess of 80% may be
approved by the Commissioner. From the inception of
the program to August 19, 1967, the Federal share of
the compensation of students employed in the College
Work-Study Program could not exceed 90%. From August
20, 1967 to August 19, 1968, the maximum Federal share
was 85%.
participating institut~on is responsible for ensuring
that the remaining share, which is referred to as the
institutional share, is contributed promptly in conjuction with payroll disbursements,
A
(Section 603 contains a further discussion of the institutional and Federal shares of student compensation.)
2.
An institution participating in the College Work-Study
Program is required, under Section 444(a)(5) of the
law, to maintain its own efforts in the areas of student
employment and student financial aid,
From the inception of the program through fiscal year
1969 (ending June 30, 1969), the Federal funds made
available to an institution for a College Work-Study
Program must be used to expand student employment expenditures beyond those which the institution provided
in its own student employment program prior to its
entry into the College Work-Study Program . (Section
602 contains specific information with regard to the
level of student employment expenditures which must
be maintained.}
After July 1, 1969, and for fiscal years ending on or
after June 30, 1970, the Federal funds made available
to an institution for a College Work-Study Program must
be used to expand student financial aid expenditures
beyond those which the institution provided in its own
student financial aid program prior to fiscal year 1970,
or to its entry into the College Work-Study Program,
whichever is later. (Section 602 will be revised at a
later date. )
1-3
(Rev. 4/69}
�105
Federal Administrative Responsibilities
An institution's first point of contact on any matter affecting
the program should be the Regional Office for the area in which
the institution is located. The addresses and telephone numbers
of the nine Regional Offices of the Office of Education are listed
in Appendix 4.
The Regional Office student financial aid staff assists the institution with program development and operational problems, makes
recommendations on the institution's application for funds, conducts
on-site program reviews, and generally provides assistance to college
personnel on an individual basis. In addition, the regional audit
staff of the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare arranges
for periodic audits of the College Work-Study Program. (Section 607
contains additional details about program audits.)
The College Work-Study Branch, Division of Student Financial Aid
in Washington is responsible for the general ad.ministration of the
program, including the development of policy and program materials,
final award of grants, and review of fiscal and operations reports.
The titles and telephone numbers of the Washington office personnel
are listed in Appendix 4.
1.,..4
�603 Federal and Institutional Shares of Student Compensation
Effective August 20, 1968, the law provides that the Federal share
of the compensation of students employed in the College Work-Study
Program cannot exceed 80%, except that in certain circumstances to
be established by regulation, a Federal share in excess of 80% may
be approved by the Commissioner. From the inception of the program
to August 19, 1967, the Federal share of the compensation of students employed in the College Work-Study Program could not exceed
90%. From August 20, 1967 to August 19, 1968, the maximum Federal
share was 85%.
The institutional share of each student's gross compensation, whether
provided in cash or otherwise, (see section 605 for a discussion of
noncash payments) must equal at least 20%. The institutional share
must be contributed promptly in conjunction with payroll disbursements.
All disbursements of compensation of students under the program must be
in the proper Federal/institutional share. This requirement holds true
regardless of the source of the institutional share. (See Section 604.)
In cases where students are working under an agreement entered into
between the institution and a public or private nonprofit agency, the
agreement should specify the extent to which the agency will bear the
cost of such contributions.
6-3
~ev. 4/69 )
�Communications, including telephone toll calls, telegrams, and similar
items, may be charged when such communications are directly related to
the conduct of the off....campus phase of the program. Employee travel
necessary to the conduct of the off-campus activities should be computed
and charged according to the institution t s own regulations governing
employee travel expense,
607 Program Audit
Unlike the National Defense Student Loan Fund, which is a revolving
trust fund, Federal College Work-Study funds are accounted for by 6month grant periods, All records pertaining to program management
and fiscal control during a given fiscal year must be retained by the
institution for a period of five years following the end of the fiscal
year, or until audited by the Department of Health, Education, and
Welfare Audit Agency or its authorized representative, whichever is
earlier. Records involved in any claim or expenditure questioned by
the Commissioner, or on audit, must be retained until necessary adjustments have been reviewed and approved by the Commissioner,
Under the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938, as amended, the Department
of Labor requires the retention of records. Employers are required to
keep records on wages, hours, and other items listed in the recordkeeping regulations, 29 CFR Part 516. No particular form of records
is requested. Records must be ~etained at least three years. (This
record retention period is separate and apart from that required in the
preceding paragraph.) Contact the nearest Office of the Wage and Hour
and Public Contracts Divisions, listed in Appendix 8, for more specific
information.
When the College Work-Study Program at an institution is audited, the
objectives of an audit will be to determine whether the institution;
1.
has met the requirements of the applicable laws and regulations in establishing the College Work-Study Program;
2.
has established adequate systems of internal control,
accounting, and reporting, and has exercised suitable
controls in the operation of and accounting for the
funds provided for the program; and
3.
has established and is following policies and procedures to
ensure that the funds provided are being used only for the
purposes set forth in the institution's agreement with the
Commissioner and that the policies and procedures conform
with the applicable laws and regulations.
Since independent auditors, such as a state auditor or an institution's
own Certified Public Accounting firm, may be authorized to perform
audits of the College Work-Study Program, institutions are encouraged
6-7
(Rev, 4/69)
�to schedule annual audits of their programs. Certified or Licensed
Public Accountants may obtain a copy of the College Work-Study Program
Audit Guides from the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare
Regional Auditor at the addresses listed in Appendix 4. The expense,
if any, of such an audit is properly chargeable to the administrative
expense allowance discussed in Section 606.
6- 8
(Rev. 4/ 69)
GPO 1174•11'6
�APPENDIX 1
Higher Education Act of 1965 (P.L. 89-329)
Title IV, Part C, as amended
Part c--work-Study Programs
Statement of Purpose; Appropriations Authorized
Sec. 441. (a) The purpose of this part is to stimulate and
promote the part-time employment of students, particularly students
from low-income families, in eligible institutions who are in need
of the earnings from such employment to pursue courses of study at
such institutions.
(b) There are authorized to be appropriated $225,000,000 for
the fiscal year ending June 30, 1969, $255,000,000 for the fiscal
year ending June 30, 1970, and $285,000,000 for the fiscal year
ending June 30, 1971, to carry out this part.
Allotments to States
Sec. 442. (a) From the sums appropriated to carry out this
part for a fiscal year, the Coumissioner shall (1) allot not to
exceed 2 per centum among Puerto Rico, Guam, American Samoa, the
Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands, and the Virgin Islands
according to their respective needs for assistance under this
part, and (2) reserve the amount provided by subsection (e). The
remainder of such sums shall be allotted among the States as provided in subsection (b).
(b) Of the sums being allotted under this subsection-Cl) one-third shall be allotted by the Commissioner among
the States so that the allotment to each State under this
clause will be an amount which bears the same ratio to such
one-third as the number of persons enrolled on a full-time
basis in institutions of higher education in such State bears
to the total number of persons enrolled on a full-time basis
in institutions of higher education in all the States.
(2) one-third shall be allotted by the Comissioner among
the States so that the allotment to each State under this
clause will be an amount which bears the same ratio to such
l
(Rev. 4/69)
�one-third as the number of high school graduates (as defined
in section 103(d)(3) of the Higher Education Facilities Act
of 1963) of such State bears to the total number of such
high school graduates of all t.h e States, and
(3) one-third shall be allotted by him among the States
so that the allotment to each State under this clause will
be an amount which bears the same ratio to such one-third
as the number of related children under eighteen years of
age living in families with annual incomes of less than
$3,000 in such State bears to the number of related children under eighteen years of age living in families with
annual incomes of less than $3,000 in all the Stateso
(c) The amount of any State's allotment which has not been
granted to an eligible institution under section 443 at the end
of the fiscal year for which appropriated shall be reallotted by
the Commissioner in such manner as he determines will best assist
in achieving the purposes of this Acto Amounts reallotted under
this subsection shall be available for making grants under section
443 until the close of the fiscal year next succeeding the fiscal
year for which appropriated.
(d) For purposes of this section, the term "State" does not
include Puerto Rico, Guam, American Samoa, the Trust Territory
of the Pacific Islands, and the Virgin Islands.
(e) From the appropriation for this part for each fiscal year
the Commissioner shall reserve an amount to provide work-study
assistance to students who reside in, but who attend eligible
institutions outside of, American Samoa or the Trust Territory of
the Pacific Islandso The amount so reserved shall be allotted to
eligible institutions and shall be available only for the purpose
of providing work-study assistance to such students.
Grants for Work-Study Programs
Sec. 443. (a) The Commissioner is authorized to enter into
agreements with eligible institutions under which the Commissioner
will make grants to such institutions to assist in the operation
of work-study programs as hereinafter provided.
(b) For the purposes of this part the term "eligible institution"
means an institution of higher education (as defined in section 435(b)
of this Act), or an area vocational school (as defined in section 8(2)
of the Vocational Education Act of 1963)0 !/
2
(Rev. 4/69)
�Conditions of Agreements
Sec. 444. (a) An agreement entered into pursuant to section 443
shall-(1) provide for the operation by the institution of a
program for the part-time e'ployment of its students in work
for the instituti9n itself! or work in the public interest
for a public or private nonprofit organization under an
arrangement between the institution and such organization,
and such work-(A) will not result in the displacement of employed
workers or impair existing contracts for services,
(B) will be governed by such conditions of employ•
ment as will be appropriate and reasonable in light of
such factors as type of work performed, geographical
region, and proficiency of the employee, and
(C) does not involve the construction, operation, or
maintenance of so much of any facility as is used or
is to be used for sectarian instruction or as a place
for religious worship;
(2) provide that funds granted an eligible institution
pursuant to section 443 may be used only to make payments to
students participating in work-study programs, except that an
institution may use a portion of the sums granted to it to
meet administrative expenses, but the amount so used may not
exceed 5 per centum of the payments made by the Conmissioner
to such institution for that part of the work-study program
in which students are working for public or nonprofit
organizations other than the institution itself;1/
(3) provide that in the selection of students for employment under such work-study program preference shall be given
to students from low-income families and that employment under
such work-study program shall be furnished only to a student
who (A) is in need of the earnings from such employment in
order to pursue a course of study at such institution, (B) is
capable, in the opinion of the institution, of maintaining
good standing in such course of study while employed under
the program covered by the agreement, and (C) has been
accepted for enrollment as a full-time student at the
institution or, in the case of a student already enrolled
in and attending the institution, is in good standing and
in full-time attendance there either as an undergraduate,
graduate, or professional student;
3
(Rev. 4/69)
�(4) provide that the average hours of employment of a
student under such work-study program, shall not exceed
fifteen per week over a semester, or other term used by
the institution in awarding credits, during which the
student is enrolled in classes;
(5) provide that in each fiscal year during which the
agreement remains in effect, the institution shall expend
(from sources other than payments under this part) for
the employment of its students (whether or not in employment eligible for assistance under this part) an amount
that is not less than its average annual expenditure for
such employment during the three fiscal _years preceding
the fiscal year in which the agreement is entered into;!/
(6) provide that the Federal share of the compensation
of students employed in the work-study program in accordance with the agreement will not exceed 80 per centum of
such compensation; except that the Federal share may exceed
80 per centum of such compensation if the Commissioner
determines, pursuant to regulations adopted and promulgated
by him establishing objective criteria for such determinations, that a Federal share in excess of 80 per centum is
required in furtherance of the purposes of this part;
(7) include provisions designed to make employment under
such work-study program, or equivalent employment offered or
arranged for by the institution, reasonably available (to
the extent of available funds) to all eligible students in
the institution in need thereof; and
(8) include such other provisions as the Conmissioner
shall deem necessary or appropriate to carry out the purposes
of this part.
(b) An agreement entered into pursuant to section 443 with an
area vocational school shall contain, in addition to the provisions
described in subsection (a) of this section, a provision that a student in such a school shall be eligible to participate in a program
under this part only if he (1) has a certificate of graduation from
a school providing secondary education or the recognized equivalent
of such a certificate, and (2) is pursuing a program of education
or training which requires at least six months to complete and is
designed to prepare the student for gainful employment in a recognized occupation.
(c) For purposes of paragraph (4) of subsection (a) of this
section, in computing average hours of employment of a student
over a semester or other term, there shall be excluded any period
during which the student is on vacation and any period of nonregular enrollment. Employment under a work-study program during
4
(Rev. 4/69)
�any such period of non-regular enrollment during which classes in
which the student is enrolled are in session shall be only to the
extent and in accordance with criter.ia established by or pursuant
to regulations of the Cormnissioner.
Sources of Matching Funds
Sec. 445. Nothing in this part shall be construed as restricting
the source (other than this part) from which the institution may pay
its share of the compensation of a student employed under a work-study
program covered by an agreement under this part, and such share may be
paid to such student in the form of services and equipment (including
tuition, room, board, and books) furnished by such institutiono
Equitable Distribution of Assistance
Sec. 446. The Conmissioner shall establish criteria designed to
achieve such distribution of assistance under this part among eligible institutioras within a State as will most effectively carry out
the purposes of this Act.
1/Effective for fiscal years ending on or after June 30, 1970,
this-paragraph has been amended to read as follows:
"(b) For the purposes of this part the term 'eligible institution'
means an institution of higher education (as defined in section 435(b)
of this Act), an area vocational school (as defined in section 8(2)
of the Vocational Education Act of 1963), or a proprietary institution
of higher education (as defined in section 46l(b) of this Act)."
2/Effective for fiscal years ending on or after June 30, 1970,
sect~n 444(a)(l) has been amended by inserting after "work for the
institution itself" the following: "(except in the case of a proprietary institution of higher education),".
3/Effective for fiscal years ending on or after June 30, 1970,
this-paragraph has been amended to read as follows:
"(2) provide that funds granted an eligible institution pursuant to section 443 may be used only to make payments to
students participating in work-study programs, except that an
5
(Rev. 4/69)
�institution may use a portion of the swns granted to it to meet
administra tive expenses in accordance with section 463 of this
Act;"o
(Section 463 reads as follows:)
"Expenses of Administration
"Sec. 4630 (a) An institution which has entered into an agreement with the Commissioner under part A or C of this title shall
be entitled for each fiscal year for which it receives an allotment
under either such part to a payment in lieu of reimbursement for
its expenses during such fiscal year in administering programs
assisted under such part. The payment for a fiscal year (1) shall
be payable from each such allotment in accordance with regulations
of the Commissioner, and (2) shall (except as provided in subsection
(b)) be an amount equal to 3 per centum of (A) the institution's
expenditures during the fiscal year from its allotment under part A
plus (B) its expenditures during such fiscal year under part C for
compensation of students.
"(b) The aggregate amount paid to an institution for a fiscal
year under this section plus the amount withdrawn from its student
loan fund under section 204(b) of the National Defense Education
Act of 1958 may not exceed $125,000o"
!/Effective for fiscal years ending on or after June 30, 1970,
this paragraph has been amended to read as follows:
"(5) provide that the institution will meet the requirements
of section 464 of this Act (relating to maintenance of effort);"
(Section 464 reads as follows:)
"Maintenance of Effort
"Sec. 464. An agreement between the ColllDissioner and an institution under part A or part C shall provide assurance that the
institution will continue to spend in its own scholarship and
student-aid program, from sources other than funds received under
such parts, not less than the average expenditure per year made
for that purpose during the most recent period of three fiscal
years preceding the effective date of the agreement."
6
(Rev. 4/69)
GPo 874-8 1 3
�AT LAN TA VRDAN CORPS
30 COURTLAND STREET, N .E .
/
PHONE [404]
524-8091
/
ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30303
PRESS RELEASE


PRESS RELEASE


Date: June 27, 1969
Subject: The Opportunity for Black Involvement
For future details, contact: Ken Millwood
Public Relations Director
For Immediate Release:
The concept of permitting active young minds to serve their community by
attacking its crucial problems is being brought to life this summer for the first
time in Atlanta. The Atlanta Urban Corps is placing competent college students
into summer jobs with relevance to the contemporary urban situation.
The Atlanta Urban Corps is a student conceived, student managed organization
which is designed to draw upon the mental resources of concerned college students
in coping with city problems. The Corps has _s tudents working in areas of mental
health, city services, social work, traffic engineering, education, community art,
and many others. The students gain an educational experience unknown in any
American classroom. The city benefits in that crucial jobs that have long been
ignored finally get qualified attention.
A most important aspect of the community-student dialogue is the meaningful
involvement of black students in the problems of urban life. Reality teaches us
that blacks are those . whose life-styles are confined most heavily by the Metropolis.
1herefore, the true worth of the Urban Corps experiment is built on the strong
core of black students participating in the program.
The Atlanta Urban Corps is pleased to announce the placement of the following
students from the Atlanta University Complex . As can be seen by their jobs,
these students are participating in agencies which can help solve the fundamental
ills of the city.
CLARK COLLEGE
1.
2.
3.
4.
s.
6.
7.
8.
9.
Linda Alexander
Charles Choice
Walter Driver
Grauze Fretwell
Janice Her:ring
Iris Hightower
Delores Jame s
Cynthia Knight
Betty Peters
AGENCY
Dekalb YMCA
Parks and Recreation
Connnunity Arts, Inc.
Atlanta Youth Council
Atlanta Public Library
Connnunity Arts, Inc.
Atlanta Youth Council
Wheat Street Baptist Church
Literacy Action Foundation
�Page 2
June 27, 1969
1
CLARK COLLEGE (cont'd)
AGENCY
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
Atlanta Youth Council
Atlanta Public Library
Peace Corps
Urban Lab
City Water Department
Martha Sinnnons
Dorothy Wright
Carol Bonner
Barbara Holl and
Paul Johnson
MOREHOUSE
1.
2.
3o
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
Edwin Barrett
Robert ~rown
Mike Floyd
Edqie Gaffney
James Kennedy·
Eddie Mitchell
Jesse Moore
Loyd Sanders
Julis Stephens
Mike Stublefield
Kay Dunlap
Marvin Mangham
Ronald Terry
Georgia Employment Center
City Purcha sing Department
City Parks and Recreation
Vine City Pro j ect
Atlanta Youth Council
Wheat Street Baptist Church
American Cancer Society
Atlanta Youth Council
Parks and Re creation
Street Theatre
Parks and Recreation
Finance Department
City Water Department
SPELMAN
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
Rudine Arnold
Pamela Do zier
Linda Howard
Diane Lewis
Sa nd r a Mincey
Madie Moore
Teia Sinkfield
Bessie Quillens
Kirkwood Center
Georgia Ea ster Seal Foundation
Literacy Action Foundation
Atlanta Gir ls Club
Wheat Street Baptist Church
Atlanta Public Library
Atlanta Youth Council
Y.M.C.A.
MORRIS BROWN COLLEGE
1..
2.
·3._
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10 .
11.
12.
13 .
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
1~~
20.
Brenda Comer
Calvin Davis
Alyce Hamilton
Rose Haywood
Dorothy Humphrey
Jerome J efferson
Addie Mitche ll
Chester McElroy
George My les
Belinda Pennington
Sanford Pr ater
Carr oll Simmons
Deborah Sma l l
Bet t ye Unde rwood
Cynthia Wadde ll
Clovia Wheeler
Rosalind Wi ll iams
Re gina Braxton
Vivian Chandler
M!St'Y Strozier
Atlanta Girls Club
Parks and Re creation
Atlanta Youth Council
Atlanta Youth Council
Y.W.C.A.
Mennonite House
Wheat Street Bap t ist Church
Parks and Recreation
City Sanitation Department
Immigrat i on Department
Sar ah Mur phy Home
Atlanta Gir ls Club
Immigra t i on Depar t men t
At lan ta Ur ban Cor ps
Easter Seal Found a t i on
Purcha sing Department
Gate City Day Nur sery
Kilkwood Center
Fulton County Health Department
American Cancer Society
�C ~
./
H
'
(_ · ~-=-
~,,. ·-·· -
·--- ~...
_1.:_ . . :.-
DEPARTMENT OF
FINANCE
501 CITY HALL
ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30303
June 27, 1969
CHARLES L. DAVIS
DIRECTOR OF FINANCE
W. ROY SMITH
DEPUTY DIRECTOR OF FINANCE
EDGAR A . VAUGHN , JR .
DEPUTY DIRE-CTOR OF FINANCE
JAMES R. FOUNTAIN, JR .
DEPUTY DIRECTOR OF FINANCE
MEMORANDUM:
TO:
FROM:
Geor ge Be r~y
Linda Anderson
SUBJECT:
Urban Corps
The audit staf f has completed their audit of the books and
records of the Atlanta Children and Youth Services Council
as of May 31, 196 9.
This audit indicates that Urban Corps owes the Youth Council $1,315.11 (details attached).
Please prepare a mi scellaneous requisition r eimbursing the
Youth Council as soon as possible.
LA
LA: lek
Attachme nt
�ATLANTA URBAN CORPS
AHOID'1TS DUE
ATLANTA CHILDREN AND YOUTH SERVIC ES COUNCIL
Salari es - Ne t "/(
Di anne Wilson
Sue Zander
Steve Mwamba
Arlene Bird
$
601. 24
299.97
136.40
2Lf2. 50
$ 1,280.11
Office Supplies
35 .00
TOTAL due to Youth Council
$ 1,315.11
"/:Does not include withholdings a s fol lows:
FWT
GHT
$ 37 . 48
19.90
-0-0-
$ 138.30
69 .10
-0 -0-
$ 10. 16
4.78
-0-0-
$ 57.38
$ 207.40
$ 14-. 94
FIC-:A
Dianne Wilson
Sue Zander
St eve Mwamba ·
Arlene Bird
,..
Note:
De tails in Audit or's workpapers.
�1
AN CORPS MINUTES
- - - - ~.....,....- TI1,rG- 3: tr0 pm
e 27t1i or une
Robinson stated that if the Urban Corps people wanted to have meetings outside
of t heir re ularl scheduled meetin w ith him :; , such as for the ur ose of sensiti vif y training, then it would be okay with him only if he wiere contacted in advance
- - - - -=.s_ t b_ th_e_tim...e_ancLplac_e_ o_f_sJ1.d1_meeting. _Jj' the meeting was to be held in Cit Hall
Mr J j Robinson would also have to make arrangements to reserve the proper facilities.
I
Two feq.eral government inters will be working on the field starting Monday. Mr.
and- Mi s-s -So-r-re-1- wi-ll- be- we-r king -in- Na-sh--- - - --·
Wa ~I ington. The City Hall interas should plan to make sure that these two new
- - - - - --1--r
n t -ct
J +r-n~s~ 1· 5 en 1n w1 11- f eir acfi v i t,:-1e
= s-.- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
- - - - -nerh ent-wd-1- b-e-wor-king- i-n -E-a.-s-t- 6-entr al- dn--
Mr, Robinson then announce that two interns, Mr. Ber an Mr-:----F em1ng, w-oula _ _ _
_______a_l _s~1+t out in the field shortly and arrangements would be made accordingly.
---Mr Robinson felt that it was a good idea for the interns to get as diversified a,s, summer
as ~ ossible .
t i¥e-J.uJ.;cJ,-1.%.9, he_Eoli=--depat.trruenLwilLha,re_f011Ln=-w-=s<keuL.going__~ - - s team to remove all the unwanted, inoperative automobiles
Eff
1
1
and trash remain a c onstant problem throughout the poverty areas that the
i n e ns a
wor-ktrrg-m.
- - J . ~ obins on a nnoun ceo. t at 1 any o C Uie in erns wan e d t o have a cTean.:.-ffp- j::>rogram
c -c--tha they let their supervisors know in advance so that arrangements might b e made

+-+-for / ruck s and ma c hinery to be t ere on the day fo < the clean-up project. A comment
_____fro~ i.h ~ a_udLenc e e xp res _§_e d that Satu_I d a_y wo~ l ~ b~ ~ go9 d day_ to pic~ u_p the tr as_h_._ __
San·tary m e eting s are always on Wednesday and it is good to let the department know

_
.L h,¥_p..r_o~_e c t...tha t_a_pick-up_\~.rn.uld_ha.:
t L..be......m=a~d=e~ f=o~r..~ - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
-


61--G-Gm-s a.id.- tha... the..r e-we..~e- m -a n Y- Gar s h a t - neede d to be- pi .c
k e..cLup.....in_tb.e_ E.it.ts. b..u r_g__


arela of the city. He said that in a area that amounted to only one- e i g hth (1/8) of
Pit sbur-g he m a rked ove r 50- car-s- and felt th-at -h-e mis-sed as - m -a ny-. - H e e-xp r e ss-e d-- the opinion t ha t a total plan involving all the inte rns b e e volved so tha t a mor e
e ff cti ve cle an - up can be r eachea. in t h es e are a s :-
- - - - - -±v1c-r-
A d ~scussi o n t en e nsuea a s fo wlii ch philosophy w as oest ,-n a vi n g cars pic ke d up . . ine f fici e ntly but w i t!: c ommuni ty_ b <:.._<:_king or to ha v~ c c:_r s _p i c_½e~:e.__effici ~nt~y bu!_ _ _
w i t~ou t m u ch c omm u n i t y suppo r t • M r. Robinson fe lt that since this p r oblem i s
_s.u c#-g, £: Ons tan t Qn e, ~J].d . . .Q.i nc e_ t_b. 0 nte_rns w ill b_e h e re g_nl y: _a s umm er, it i-&
w oul d b e b ett e r t o h ave t h e community ba cking e ve n if th e cle a n - up w a s n ot a s
effiide n .t as it could b e . -Thos e f a v o r i ng c.omm u ni..ty_ ac.t i.on a s.... op.p o..s e..d to _effe cti venes_s.
II e d t o d om1nat
.
s ee171
e.
______M
_ r_ ,_
j. R o binson then called the C O s i n t o
t ot;ne -urhan ea-rps pe-uple.
I
as
h i s o ffice and h e turned--;he m~e ~ing over
�CITY OF ATLANTA
DEPARTMENT OF
FINANCE
501 CITY HALL
ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30303
June 26, 1969
CHARLES L . DAVIS
DIRECTOR OF FINANCE
W. ROY SMITH
DEPUTY DIRECTOR OF FINANCE
EDGAR A. VAUGHN , JR .
DEPUTY DIRECTOR OF FINANCE
JAMES R . FOUNTAIN, JR .
DEPUTY DIRECTOR OF FINANCE
Mr. Dan E. Sweat, Jr .
Director of Governmental Liaison
Mayor's Office
City of Atlanta
Atlanta, Georgia 30303
Dear Dan:
Reference is made to your letter of June 25, 1969, in which
you advise of the oversight in providing travel allowances for
certain interns in the Urban Core Program. I agree with your
concept of paying these interns; however, I believe it would
be wise to transfer funds from the operating account, 770U, to
a S00U account which is normaily established for auto allowances
or transportation purposes. This action would be consistent
with the general accounting procedures of the city and would set
forth the proper record of expenditures of the Urban Core.
In order to implement this, I would need an estimate of the cost
of transportation so that the appropriate transfer within
appropriations can be made.
Sincerely,
c:ft{~ / &7c._
Ch rles L. Davis
Director of Finance
CLD:dhf
�June ZS, 1969
Mr. Sam Willi m
Atlanta Urban Corp Proj ct
uniclp : Auditorium
Atl n • Ci _Cl"
30303
Der Sm:
ttacb d eopy of
v 1e
nae
Pl
l tter to Dir ctoT of .F inanc
for Ur n Co~p• En.l!'oU e •
r1
8
• ho
It l• r q
ted that you provid m
·th 1i t o! tho
will
r que,ttng reimbur m nt for thi· pui-po a.nd, lso. n · tim t
both mo thly n in total lor
of th. numb r o1 mil • th.at will
dri
th b nefit of th Ur
Corp• ProJ c:t.
Y. ry trw.1 your•,
G or • J •
. dmini tr
OBJ:p
.Attac
t
be: Charl . L. Davi
Dan S e t
Johnny Robin on
�ATLANTA VRBAN CORPS
30 COURTLAND STREET, N .E .
/
PHONE [404) 52 4 -8091
/
ATLANTA , GEORGIA 30303
June 25, 1969
Mr. George Berry
Office of the Mayor
City Hall
City of Atlanta
68 Mitchell Street, S. W.
Atlanta, Georgia 30303
Dear George:
Attached are two statements certifying part-time, spring term
employment for Mr. Bill Adams and Mr. David Whelan with the
Atlanta Urban Corps.
These men are t o receive $250 each as an educational stipend.
(This is not taxable income since they were receiving academic
credit for their Urban Corps services, therefore there are no
W-2 forms attached for tax deduction purposes.)
Two other students were employed under the sane agreement. They
are Rich Speer and Marcus Dash. I do not have their statements
at this time certifying employment. Please pardon the rush on
these two students , but Bill Adams is leaving for Europe Thursday ,
June 26, 1969, and needs his check before he leaves.
Thank you for helping us expidite this matter.
SAM A. WILLI.AMS
Director
SAW : sz
Enclosure
�bee : :Mrr . George B erry
M r. Sam W illiam s
J~e ZS ., ·1969
Mr . Charles L . Davis
Dir ctor of Fin nc
City of Atlanta
Atla.nt , Georgia
Dear Charles :
An unanti cipat d xp ns it m ha
ri en in connection w ith th Urb n
Corps Project. No budg t provision wa rnad for travel xpen s in
conn ction with ny of the nrollee •
o t of them r
ng g d in duti
which do not re quire tr v 1. Howev r , a r ativ ly sm 11 nwnber h ve
been s igned to work hich do
requlr th us of th ir p r on 1
v hicl . Ex mple are tho
in the Mayor ' Office a sign d s
Community Servic Coo din tors in th EOA Cent rs and, al o . tho
on th Urban C orps staff that r reqw.red to tra-q l to the variou
ork
tations to intervi w aup rvieor ~ t
c re of cornplai.a.ts, nd p rform
the valuation fu.nction .
l o , ther is
probl m. w find, in tranaporting
th p yroll r coi-d s from the v rioue work t tions to
d from th central
p yroll unit in City Hall.
It is# o! cour , not riaht for th enroll
to b r qu.ir d to uae th ir
priv te vehlcl
rfor.m nee of their ssign d dutic
ithout
reirnbureem nt. I m ell
re , how v r , it ould not b pr ctical to
req et the Board of Aldermen toe tabliah t mpor ry auto lowanc
tor such a pro ram
thb. e pecially in ....,l
o{ th f ct t t ther
no st blish d number d posltlo.o•.
propoa , th r for4!. to r imbur1e thos
nr ll e
o the b ala of the stand rd city rat .
propose to • c r · a ai
t m nt certifying • to the rn.11•• driv non Ur n Coi- • budn sa thin
a iv n month and forwa to your offic · for pa
nt alon
1th mbc llan ou
reqweition. B•c
thi mounts wUl be r lati l sm 11 both i divldually ·
d
tot 1,
111 c r
account G-25.62.-77 U.
b li v t t thi
ill be the moat x
ltlou
ay to awu~U.Lc• thl• matt r.
W
Sincerely your,
Dan
• t
�Jun
24~ 1969
Mis RUili ill ·
posit on ·
y
�June 24, 1969
Prpfeosor Rog~ Whedon
1417 South Gordon Str -et, S. W.
Atlanta., Georgi 30310
a.r Professor Whedon:
Thank you ~or
cepting
position as e.n Eduction Advisor for th initi 1
As you lmow, Ed Angus
o~ li ison
with the Southern Regional Edu.c tion Bot\?'d when you
int rvi
for th
position and th
was so
question ._ to ho you ould b. p id. SREB bas
transfi rred m.oney sign.at d for Urban Corps use to our budg t . For your
duce.ti one.l consult e you will :r c iv
stip nd of $1,000 for the sumuii r
program.
program of th · Atlo.nta Urban Co.rpo.
,-- - -
your sti nd in tour inst
nt of 250.00
6, and th la.at e k
er int rn r ports
W will 1 u
23,
A~
h on J'Uly 2, July
n dit
pproved by you.
1 t
fir
t of it kind in th
tion. Your 1nit1 ti
ot its GUCC s •
ingf'ul. part
I
j
int
t
�J\ll'le
24, 1969
Prof seor Rog r Rupnow
a.rtmont of City Planning
~~gia Institut of Tee ology
Atlanta, ~orgia 30332
Dear R
r:
Tha.nlt you for aec pting
position as an Education Ad~or for the nitie.J.
pro~ of th Atlanta. Urban Corps. -s you know, Ed Angus
s our liaison
with the Southern R gional. Education Boa.rd wh n you w: , · int rvi
d for the
position
d t
was so qu stion
to ho you would b pi . SREB
tra.naferr d mon y d sign ted for U'rbl\tl Corps us to our b ~t . For yoU2'
due :tionol conaultanc y-ou wiU r cai
stj,p _nd ot $1,000 for th summei•
progr
hon July 2, July
t
Tbin :Pro
1 t
1.nd 1n thl nation.
it
• WILL
s
s•
Your initi ti
din
�Dr. Carl Fr nklin Wieck
pa.rtm nt of English
Mor. hous Coll g
Atlanta, Georgi 303].4
Dear Dr. Wi ok:
'l'ba.nk you for accepting a position as an Education Advisor for the initial
program of the Atlante. Urban Corps. As you kno , Ed Anguo was ou.r li ison
with the South irn Regional Education Boa.rd wh n you er intervi wed for th
position
d th! . was some question · c to ho you would bo pa.id. SREB has
tranaf rred. mon y de ignat ·d for Urban Corps use to our budg t. For your
ducational consultance you will rec ive a stip nd of $1,000 for th s
program.
r
You,r dqti s ill include on tb job visitation th int.e
visors, planning and conducting duco.tion s mine.rs for s
grou s s ll
as all. int ms, working in coordination with our f'i ld valuation staff to
insure "job r leva.ncy and ducation significance" of each int rnehip,
d
as ioting the interns in th ir ticulation of this oxperienc as th return
to their r spectiv; colleges and univeraitios. Your duti swill lso inclu.d
counseling interna on their f
l report and r a.ding and approving r ports,
using th b ic outline in t
Int rnship Handbook.
W r a.lize t t many of yours ific r sponeibil1ti a ar
but
you to b inno ti a.nd work with our
uation st
, ne~u:i.ed by R sn HnmnUI.,..,
in plAnning det 111 . W . anticipat · that your Urban Corps duti s will requir
ro""IO'.:~ on -third o
your time.
your tip nd in four i .,.............nt of 2,0 .
23, August 6 i
t
t ch ok after intern r ports
ppro d by you~
will is
Thie proe;r
will b
Sine r _ly,
cc:
is t
17
t"1rot ot it tind in the
ingtul po.rt ot ito
tion.
hon July 2, July
n dit d d
Your in1t1ativ
d int
r st
\
�J
24, 1969
···--........_.


ti


�ATLANTA VROAN CORPS
30 COURTLAND STREET , N .E.
/
PHONE [404) 524-8091
/
ATLANTA , GEORGIA 30303
June 23, 1969
(.JJlc~fe,d
Jv11 e
z ~ / 9'l r}
Mr. George Berry
City of Atlanta
City Hall
Atlanta, Georgia
Re :
Invoice from Standard Press, Inc.
Dear George:
I received today an invoice1 which is attached1 from Standard Press,
Inc., 739 Trabert Avenue, N.W. in the amount of sixty-five and
/forty-nine one-hundredths dollars ($65.49) for printing contracted · dr
prior to the adoption on May 19, 1969 of the ordinance creating the
Atlanta Urban Corps as a division of the Mayor's office.
This constitute~ to the best of my knowledge, the only remaining
obligations assumed prior to the forementioned date.
Your usual prompt attention to this matter will be appreciated.
Inmond L. Den, Jr.
Director of Finance
Atlanta Urban Corps
ILD :ph
Enclosure
�cc: Mr . Charles L . D avis
Mr . Forrest Gee
Mr . George Be rry
JWle
20, 1969
r . Sam illlam.e , Du- etoJ'
Atla.ata Urban Corp ,
Aw:dci
•ud!tori m
Atl .
p GeoJ-gia 30303
D~ar- .., m.:
E el011 di Clty of .Atl n:
5-0. 00 for th
n
1 fWld ch ck .aumbeii 6056 in th
fundin
p tty
h pro<: dur · I. r t
I'
moun
Ur
• PToj•~t.
mi
C
ly
D
�ATLANTA URBAN CORPS
30 Courtland Street, N. E.
Atlanta, Georgia 30303
June 20, 1969
Urban Corps Interns, Supervisors and Friends:
The Urban Corps and several service organizations such as the
Peace Corps, VISTA, and the Southern Regional Education Board are
sponsoring a National Conference on service••learning in Atlanta June
30 - July 1, 19690 Thz initial Conference will explore the servicelearning experience of existing volunteer and service programs and
plan a metropolitan model for Atlanta involving area colleges, local
agencies, aud foundations.
A series of follow-through meetings will be held during the summer
to examin2 specific aspects of s ,·:;:-vice-learning programs such as finance,
college curriculum revision and educational aspects of service.
All Urban Corps interns will attend the first day's session June 30,
with registration starting at 8:30 a.m., at the White House Motor Inn, 70
Houston Street, N. E. Interns should notify their supervisors in advance
about their planned absence from work that day. We especially would like
intern supervisors to attend. Hopefully some interns and supervisors
will be able to attend the Tuesday Meeting as well.
During the afternoon session all interns will meet with Urban Corps
evaluation staff members for additionla information about the internship.
Therefore attendance is very crucial.
Speakers for the Conference include Atianta's Mayor, Student President
at Clark College, Georgia Tech's President, Peace Corps and VISTA Regi onal
Directors, and White House Aides .
We look forward to seeing you June 30.
Sincerel y ,
< ··--
" t. {
c)u_.{,
.~(
l •
SAM A. WILLIAMS
Director
Atlanta Urban Corps
SAW:blu
�SOUTHERN REGIONAL EDUCATION BOARD
l.SO SJ:XTH ST&EET, N.
vr.r. •
A TLANTA, OEIO ROJ:A
J
• Ch :rle Dttvi
Comptroller
Ci
or tlanta
68 1-ten U Street;
tl.anta, G
De
r Charle . :
12, 1969
aoa1.a •
875 -e.au
�2
seti?ec:!!8'._.
·a.mi:ent1:111
· ,ta
.
Ylll
nci.es.
June l2, J.969
porta. 0~ 1nt.ernahl:p appoint.men .
a · ·er · ary n ·. tillg our· obllga,..
will vorlt out .·
with
coope1'1 ti.on £ thl atty in this, effOJ<t i.# ,f!IU.eh ~~ ted.
l00Jt f ~ to 19-"".....,_16 nt"Oa:l'Btl and . S i ~ ~ odel. rm>
South and
ce:
ror
tne.
�M r . C ade L . D vi•
Dir ctor 0£ Ji"in.i.nc .
City of Atlan
Atl nt , G orgi
r C
.0
'fh
t,
Corp
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co.-p-

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